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Newly diagnosed, scared and confused

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Red_river_, Nov 6, 2017.

  1. Hiitsme

    Hiitsme Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Red_river_
    Enjoy your holiday.
    You would seem to be making sensible choices in reducing carbs, The reason I found a meter helpful was that I could see what carbs I could eat and which ones I needed to avoid. We are all different. You don't have to use a meter but like @Prem51 said waiting for your next HbA1c can be a long time to know if things are working for you. I've been almost a year since my last HbA1c so I like to check on my meter to see my levels aren't rising, and when they do I try to do something about it fairly quickly. There are so many different ways people use to try and control diabetes and you have to find a way that works for you.
    Hope your appointment with the nurse goes well.
     
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  2. Sue192

    Sue192 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am also not testing - that may change after the next test results in about two weeks' time - but like @Grateful went straight into low-carb and as much research as I could get my head around without it exploding. My GP didn't give me the HbA1c readings as perhaps they were not very high, but I will definitely ask this time: I hadn't a clue about anything at the time of diagnosis. Cut out as many carbs as possible, and also try this on holiday if you can (a good test) - you'll be amazed what you are able to eat and still not feel deprived. Also, listen to the advice from the members here; they have a wealth of experience. And don't worry about the person with diabetes/diabetic/have diabetes thing - doesn't bother me what I'm called! - as you have enough to take in at the moment.
     
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  3. Grateful

    Grateful Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It does work for me. At the risk of repeating myself, it is not an option I would necessarily recommend for others as we are so different. Here is why I do it this way:
    • It is a calculated risk; I am happy taking it but others will have good reasons for being more cautious (personality and/or concrete medical circumstances). Among other things, my HbA1c results must be masking some fairly large daily or hourly swings in blood glucose, and it is possible that these are harming my health even though the average over three months has settled at at a steady 30 (4.9%) for some time now.
    • I am on an extremely low-carb diet, somewhere around 30g/day. If I wanted to "experiment" by adding back some carbs, I would only want to do so in conjunction with self-testing. Three months is too long to wait for the results, and besides, I would not know which of the carb-laden foods were the problem!
    • If my initial "campaign" on a low-carb diet had failed or had disappointing results, adding self-testing would have made sense, but as it happens the A1c was brought to non-diabetic levels within the first 2.5 months.
    • Similarly, if my A1c deteriorates in future, that too would be a time to consider adding self-testing. It is supposed to be a "progressive disease" after all.
    • Finally, I eschewed self-testing because my doctor did not suggest it at diagnosis (or since), and I did not know better! Not prescribing self-testing does seem to be the "default option" for doctors both here in America and in the U.K. for newly diagnosed T2s and I just did what I was told!
    To each, his/her own path....
     
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  4. Red_river_

    Red_river_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am enjoying my holiday thank you, and I am still being sensible with food. Now I have a silly question : can you buy a meter that reads HbA1c at all? My sister in law has been a diabetic for a few year, she doesn't self test as GP didn't suggest. She only sees DN once a year to check HbA1c level as many others in this forum. If you do self testing, can you work out what your HbA1c is?
     
  5. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    The HBA1C is an average over 8-12 weeks, 24/7 and homes tests will just provide snap shot results around meals mostly so it's hard to compare with any accuracy. Although both are blood tests they are testing in different ways.

    There are apps that you can put your test results into and it can estimate your HBA1C , I think @Rachox tried this.

    To be honest when you have been testing for years you get a good idea how your tests at home will relate to your HBA1C.

    The website of this forum has some converters between home testing units and HBA1C so if you put in an average of your home tests in it would give an idea how that equates to HBA1C.

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/hba1c-to-blood-sugar-level-converter.html

    If you used a continous monitoring device like the freestyle libre this will work out at estimated HBA1C and as this technology improves I image it will be more accurate.
     
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  6. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    I put my blood sugar readings into the app MySugr. Once you’ve in put sufficient data it will work out an approximate HbA1c for you. My last HbA1c at the Drs was 36, MySugr said 34.4 that day, so it’s not far out. Of course it depends how many readings you put in. I put in between 5-8/day
     
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  7. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I'd forgotten about those, there are sometimes deals on them in the UK that members used to post. Are they accurate?
     
  8. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    I just looked on Amazon UK. The HbA1c meters are £69.99 with two test kits. Further test kits are £120 for 10! :wideyed:
     
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  9. Kimble73

    Kimble73 Type 2 · Member

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    I know how you feel, I was the same when I was diagnosed, Type 2, I listen to my body. I know when my sugars drop. I check but they are normal, I was told that they were probably were high and have dropped to normal, but were high all day so it makes you feel low, I forget what it's called. When I was diagnosed 7 years ago I didn't have much advice or help from my doctor, I have been guessing and reading on here to. Sometimes reading stuff on here scares me terribly so be careful where you read. Type 2 can be scary especially if others don't understand the disease and the fear a person has around it which is very normal. But if you don't have the right professional to talk about your fears you feel worse. I find the whole wording around Diabetes has put a huge stigma around Diabetes and it is really making me angry, things like "you must have been fat" or " you need to lose wieght" or " you drank pop" or " it's the way you think"( when I told my doctor I was scared) oh my god I could go on and on, and the media doesn't help with the stigma, and commercials that scare the heck out of ya, so now I don't tell people I have Type 2 Diabetes because of all the bullying, I live in silence which is worse it's caused me depression and anxiety. I felt so depressed a few years ago I was hospitalized. Living with diabetes is hell, and I'm not on medication as of now. But I know it's coming and I don't know how I am going to handle that. People need to educate and stop bullying people with Diabetes type 2. The stigma has to STOP. And the fear that is instilled. I am learning to try and speak up, to the ignorance of people, because the type of person I am I don't speak out, I get tongue twisted because I am so shocked at what people say, very ignorant and mean, and words hurt. Diabetes is not caused by what you ate, it is not because you were overweight, because thin people get Type 2 diabetes to. It's your pancreas that just doesn't work the way it should, wieght gain is a sign of diabetes not a cause. I was the same as you when I was told, then a few weeks later it hit me and cried and cried, then my doctor put me on antidepressants the worst thing for me, it was grief, and you do go through grief it is a loss, look on the Canadian diabetes website it explains about the grief and shock, it's like losing a loved one, having a chronic illness is a loss. You will, feel angry, scared, and all the other signs of grief. I have lots of grief after the diabetes diagnosis few years after I lost my dear mom, and went through it again, then we lost my husbands brother it's been an emotional roller coaster in the last few years, and the grief comes in waves of all the griefs. Read articles on grief, it will ease your mind on what your feeling, and the diet part of diabetes try going to a diabetic educator at your local hospital. And pick up books on diabetes diet. Talk to others who have diabetes talk to your family on how scared you feel. I had my mom and husband to get me through the beginning after I was diagnosed, you need a lot of support with diabetes.. forever.
     
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  10. Kimble73

    Kimble73 Type 2 · Member

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    You need to cry, you need hugs and you need reassurance that you will be okay, people didn't get it when I cried, I think my husband thought I was crazy or something, but if you feel your mood is down, and feeling depressed you need to talk to your doctor . I did and was put on antidepressants, because I was depressed and still have the depression, but I have side effects from them not everyone does, that's why I said it was a big mistake going on them in last post BUT I have to realize they have helped me I just have to find the right dose and right medication, I had a hell of a time in the beginning of my diagnoses because I had some real unsupportive family members. My husband stood by me all the way and my mom and daughter and that's what you need is Emotional support.
     
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  11. Kimble73

    Kimble73 Type 2 · Member

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    What is celeriac?
     
  12. Stephen277

    Stephen277 · Newbie

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  13. Stephen277

    Stephen277 · Newbie

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    I was diagnosed in late January although the more I think about it I was showing signs for months before.
    When I went to get checked my HBA1C was 158 and my finger prick was 26. I have yet to be diagnosed with type one or type 2.
    I also became quite depressed and was quite upset for 2-3 weeks.
    However I soon realised that things could be worse.
    Look at it in a positive perspective of being able to be in control of your condition. There are not many people who are able to be in control of their condition. I'm not relying on someone else! I choose what I eat, how much I eat, how often I exercise and this goes a long way to controlling my bg level.
    Yes it is a learning curve and change of life style, probably for the better as there is an extra incentive to eat better and exercise more.
    You will soon find what works for you, everyone is different and what works for one person will not work for another.
    I find a good breakfast, some fruit and wraps for lunch keeps me going to dinner. then I have a large dinner which prevents me from snacking before bed. as I said you will have to find out what works for you.

    At the early stages I was testing myself 4 times per day. Lucky enough watching what I eat combined with regular exercise and metformin has seen my finger prick tests give readings of an average of 6.4 over the 90 days.

    I would keep testing the four times per day until you can see that the results are stable. If your bloods are stable then reduce the number of tested per day. always take a reading first thing in the morning as this will give you a good resting bg level.

    From my personal experience, when my readings are high I know what I have eaten or over indulged on.
    Everything in moderation shouldn't cause a drastic rise in bg. I always have a desert or two on the weekend.

    If your on metformin you shouldn't be getting a low, unless your not eating properly.

    I hope this was useful.
     
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  14. Jane1980

    Jane1980 · Member

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    I’m only on 2 units of nova rapid after every meal, is that right for new to type 1? And 15 units of slow acting insulin? Be great to hear how everyone stared on insulin please?
     
  15. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    You have posted on the end of a rather elderly thread - you'll probably get more useful information if you start your own, with a suitable title to get more attention.
     
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  16. Jane1980

    Jane1980 · Member

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    Thank yoy
     
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  17. Sangre

    Sangre Type 2 · Member

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    I have been diabetic for 8 years. I wish I had known what I’m about to tell you when I was told I was pre-diabetic because I could’ve reversed it. Now, I’m hoping I can drive my type 2 into remission. I have gone on a Keto food plan. I don’t buy all the expensive powders, but I have replaced all grains with almond and coconut flours and I do most of my own baking so that I can still enjoy breads and cakes. Sugar is replaced with xylitol and stevia and monk fruit. I eat lots of nonstarchy veggies and lean meats, as well as nuts and full fat dairy. I have never, ever been hungry on this low carb eating plan. I consume less than 50 grams of carbs per day and I have so much more energy than I ever did. My avg blood sugar readings most days at either non or pre diabetic levels. I have been doing this since the end of January. At first, I also got on my treadmill or stationary bike for 20 minutes within two hours after each meal. This had the effect of draining all my sugar stores from my liver and muscles so that my body could begin to burn fat, which is called being in a state of ketosis. Now I just walk a lot during the day, or go to an exercise class. I bet you are early enough into this disease that you can save your pancreas and liver and retrain your mitochondria to become more sensitive to the insulin your body still produces with this simple formula. Low carb (and whole, natural unprocessed food) + exercise. It was a grand experiment for me. I tested at wake up, premeal, two hours after each meal, and just before going to sleep. In about two weeks my blood tests were looking GOOD. Low carb works, but you really have to know how to do it right and recipes with alternatives ingredients are essential. AND exercise is so beneficial to fight the insulin resistance, but it really needs to be cardio - aim for getting into your zone heart rate. You can do this! Don’t be depressed! Take control and you really can beat this disease!
     
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  18. Kimble73

    Kimble73 Type 2 · Member

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    Gluten free flour is still white flour, try using whole wheat flour, you can't have white flour because of the carbs.
     
  19. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    There are as many carbs in whole wheat as they are in white.
     
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  20. Kimble73

    Kimble73 Type 2 · Member

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    Whole wheat pasta is better, in small portion, I was told in my Diabetic class.
    Yes you can have a whole apple
    You can take some almonds with you on the go in a plastic baggie, and an apple that's what I did.
    Or some baby carrots and a small container of low fat dip this also can be a snack in the evening
    Drink 1% milk if you drink milk or skim milk.
    Yogurt I eat Activa vanilla
    You can have whole wheat toast with peanut butter for a snack
    For rice eat whole wheat with diced up onions in it or mushrooms sprinkle some garlic powder in the rice while cooking gives better flavour. Not garlic salt to salty.
    I eat a Subway sandwich for lunch, whole wheat bun I ask them to take some of the bread out, and I have spinach,tomatoes , cucumbers and black olives and onions with light mayo on it, and a Diet Pepsi. And my A1c's has been good please don't fret to much like I did and ended up on antidepressants and anti anxiety meds, I was a mess when diagnosed in 2012.

    Edited by Mod to remove personal contact details
     
    #200 Kimble73, Jun 1, 2019 at 10:36 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 1, 2019
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