1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Newly Diagnosed Type 2

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by ljdub, Oct 12, 2021.

  1. ljdub

    ljdub · Active Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hi There, I was diagnosed as Type 2 diabetes last week and still unsure what this means for me and going forward with any life changes. I am due to see the Diabetic nurse next week so hopefully will get my questions answered but i have a couple of immediate ones which i imagine a silly but here goes:

    i understand carbs are bad for you and like everyone else this is the thing i like the most. Do you cut these out entirely or smaller portions or not every day?

    I was told i will be on tablets, not sure which ones, what will these do, will they bring my sugar level down or do they stabilise or something else.

    I like a drink when i go out (once a month) but rarely drink any other time, is this a no-no now or is it a case of reducing the intake.

    Again, apologies if these are stupid questions but head is a mess due to this and not knowing the best course of action
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

    Messages:
    12,227
    Likes Received:
    7,280
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi. Carbs need to be kept down but some are OK. 150gm/day is a good start target. Drink is OK in moderation. beer has a lot of carbs but wine and spirits aren't too bad. You may be started on the drug Metformin which many of us use. It's very safe but isn't a miracle cure so diet is the key.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  3. Buster_

    Buster_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    60
    Trophy Points:
    58
    These aren't stupid questions at all, they're exactly the sort of thing you need to know.

    Let's get the most important one done first, you don't have to give up your monthly drink! In moderation, alcohol itself is not usually problematic for type 2's, you just need to be aware of the carbohydrates in differing drinks. Beer can cause unwelcome blood sugar spikes where as pure spirits and dry wines are much less problematic. So, if you choose wine or something like gin and (slimline) tonic you'll likely be fine.

    The first medication usually offered to newly diagnosed type 2's is metformin. It's a safe and (mostly) well tolerated drug that acts on your liver to lower the glucose it drips into your bloodstream. It can cause a bit of stomach upset in some and give you the trots, so just be aware of that when you first start taking it.

    You're right that the key to managing your condition is lowering carbohydrate intake. It's carbs that the body is super efficient at turning into sugar and firing into your bloodstream, so giving it very low amounts to work on reduces the effect of that mechanism. The amount of carbs your system can deal with will be unique to you, it's something you're going to need to learn about over coming months.

    Some people (me included) cut out almost all carbohydrate, meaning no bread, rice, pasta, potatoes at all, and certainly no direct sugars like jam or honey or sweet deserts. Others find that just reducing intake with less frequent or smaller portions will have the desired effect.

    You may find the advice from your nurse specialist or GP differs from this. It's a source of frustration here that official NHS dietary policy is so far behind the curve on this matter. Don't fret, you'll figure it all out and find what works for you.

    Probably the most effective thing you can do is get a blood glucose meter and test strips. This will allow you to start taking readings through the day and around meals to see what your BS level is at that moment and learn which foods your body tolerates well, and which it doesn't.

    Again, the NHS often tells newly diagnosed type 2's that home BS testing is not necessary, but many here have found the knowledge and insight a meter and regular testing provides has been invaluable in improving their condition.

    Ask away with any more questions that occur to you, there are plenty here who will be happy to offer help and support. Good luck!
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. ljdub

    ljdub · Active Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Thank you guys, it’s all a bit daunting but from the looks of it this forum is a great source of information and no doubt will be asking as I think of things
    Thanks Again
     
  5. JayBee28

    JayBee28 · Active Member

    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    8
    There is no such thing as a stupid question. I was diagnosed almost 4 weeks ago, and only had a phone call appointment with the diabetic nurse, I have a face 2 face appointment and check in a month.

    The nurse told me not to get a glucose meter, but I did and it’s been really useful. I have also cut out carbs (bread, pasta, rice etc) sugar, sweets, cakes etc.

    Be careful of low fat products and things like skimmed milk, they have more carbs than the full fat versions. I eat loads more protein and eggs, I feel so much better in myself. No more tiredness that was so bad previously, I have so much more energy and feel fuller. If I really fancy a snack, I have a few walnuts, almonds or pecans.

    I have also walked most days, so far lost 10 pounds, but have plenty more to go.

    Good luck.
     
    • Winner Winner x 5
    • Like Like x 2
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  6. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,004
    Likes Received:
    3,693
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Your head isn't that much of a mess, as you're asking exactly the right questions.

    Carbs are best cut down, to whatever amount you feel you can tolerate. Your meter'll let you know. Test around meals. Before your first bite, and two hours after it. You're looking for a rise of no more than 2.0 mmol/l. If it's that or under, the meal was worth repeating. If it was over, it was carbier than you can handle. Little shortcut: you can avoid bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, cereals/weetabix, practically all fruit save for berries, those are fine... And pulses are different for everyone, so worth testing to see whether you respond to them well, or no. Things that are excellent: above ground/leafy green veggies, meat, fish, poultry, eggs, cheeses, cream, that sort of thing. https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/blog-entry/the-nutritional-thingy.2330/ should help.

    You're likely to be put on metformin. Ironically enough, the leaflet says to take it after trying a diet for three months and failing, but for some reason that's universally skipped. (I'm in the Netherlands, and that was my first port of call). If you know you have a sensitive gut, you might want to request slow release metformin, as it is kinder on the insides, and never ever take it on an empty stomach as it may make you feel ill. If you do get the trots and they last for more than 2 weeks, they're not going to go away. You could also ask whether you can just try diet for 3 months and then have a re-check to see whether that made enough of a difference. I can practically guarantee you, if you go low carb, it will have by that time.

    Ah, the occasional drink. That should be fine, depending on what you're having. Beer is practically out, but that still leaves a whole lot you can still partake in. Have a read here: https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/alcohol and they're not kidding: if you go low carb/keto, alcohol comes in a whole lot harder than before, so your tolerance may differ from what you're used to. (Nursing a drink does make going out cheaper, haha).

    Keep tossing out questions, it's the only and fastest way to learn!
    Jo
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. ljdub

    ljdub · Active Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Again many thanks for the responses, just getting my head around it all but this is fantastic information I’m sure plenty more questions to come
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. Eddie65

    Eddie65 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    100
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Hi, I'm in a similar situation to you, newly diagnosed type 2, still waiting to see the Diabetic Nurse (21st). I've only been on here a few days but the levels of kindness, support and sound advice are fantastic. I don't want to give any advice, as I really don't know that much and it's very confusing, but all I would say is that I have put into practice some of the support already given to me and its reassuring to know its tried and tested. Let me know how you get on, it would be good to share and compare as we are both in the same boat at the minute.

    All the best :):)
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  9. coby

    coby Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    875
    Likes Received:
    580
    Trophy Points:
    153
    That sounds a great idea! You are both starting this journey more or less together so can 'compare' notes on how you are getting on :)
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  10. ljdub

    ljdub · Active Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hi Eddie,

    That would be great, I’ve got the diabetic nurse on 20th so we can compare after

    Many thanks
     
  11. Eddie65

    Eddie65 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    100
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Great, that should be really useful for us both! Anybody else in a similar position is welcome to come on board too :):)!
    Let me know how you manage things through the week and take care!
    Ed.
     
  12. ljdub

    ljdub · Active Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I’m trying to resist a lot of things as suggested in the forum but it’s difficult until I see the nurse and then I can go from there, I’m sure it will get easier once in a routine
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Hendersonga

    Hendersonga · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    I have just been diagnosed this morning T2. So that’s 3 of us now that can help each other. The questions you have asked are what I wanted to know so thank you. Let’s compare what our diabetic nurses say I see mine in 28th Oct.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  14. Eddie65

    Eddie65 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    100
    Trophy Points:
    53
    That sounds good, I think it will be useful for us all to share :) hope it all goes well for you on the 28th, keep us updated. Good luck and thanks for your reply :)
     
  15. ljdub

    ljdub · Active Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Good for us to start this journey in a similar time, hope all goes well and we can answer each other’s queries
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Welshjunie

    Welshjunie · Newbie

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. Welshjunie

    Welshjunie · Newbie

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I’ve just had a call from my GP. I’ve been diagnosed with T2 and my blood sugar was 125. I’ve got a prescription for metformin and aloglyptin but I’m waiting for an appointment with the diabetic nurse. I’m so confused by it all but reading these posts it seems that the best thing is to cut out the carbs, lose weight, and start taking the tablets .
     
  18. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

    Messages:
    8,948
    Likes Received:
    5,362
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I just cut down the carbs. I lost weight without even thinking about it, but found the medication pretty dire and could not go on taking it after the 5 most miserable weeks of my life. Luckily I did not need it and just coming up to 5 years from diagnosis I am absolutely fine.
    As your Hba1c is - a bit high (English understatement engaged) it would seem to infer that your blood glucose tends to be a bit high too. It is recommended that carbs are reduced slowly in order to allow your body time to adapt to the change. Sometimes being denied a warm sugary bath causes tantrums. They are soothed by taking a warm drink and a tiny amount of carbs - I found that just three grapes did the trick. It is called a false hypo, but it can be rather alarming if you are not expecting it.
     
  19. coby

    coby Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    875
    Likes Received:
    580
    Trophy Points:
    153
    @Welshjunie Welcome, and you missed out the perhaps most important thing .. which is to get yourself a blood glucose meter asap and begin testing for what you can tolerate and what to avoid! I wish you well x
     
  20. SuBelcanto

    SuBelcanto · Newbie

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I'm 6 weeks post diagnosis and had the same Hba1c of 125. Conflicting info from GP and Diabetes Nurse especially as my cholesterol is too high. I went on too high a dose of Metformin which combined with my decision to cut carbs out brought my blood glucose down so fast I ended up with blurred vision and faux hypos (am now on slow release Metformin and eating some carbs). My advice to you is read everything you can online and in books and experiment.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook