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Newly Diagnosed?

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by PeteJR24, Apr 17, 2019.

  1. PeteJR24

    PeteJR24 · Member

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    Hello All!

    My name is Pete from the USA and wanted to get your thoughts. I'm a 33 year old male, 5' 6", 155 lbs, no family history of any medical conditions, except an overactive bladder. I recently went for a yearly check-up with my doctor. I was recently feeling thirsty, drinking a lot of water and urinating at night so I brought it up to my doctor, they did a fasting prick glucose test and it showed A1C of 9.9!

    About 11 months ago at my last yearly check-up, it showed a 120 or so glucose fasting and the doctor did not say anything. The year before, it was around a 94 glucose fasting.

    The doctor prescribed me 500mg metaformin to take 2x a day - I cut out all junk food and started exercising more. In 5 days, I am down to 130-145 blood glucose before meals.

    1.) Does it appear that I definitely have diabetes? (I'm just guessing type 2)
    2.) I don't feel any damage, but is there any way to tell if I already have damage or will get complications?
    3.) Is there A CHANCE that I can reverse or make glucose levels normal again quickly, since it appears I caught it early and they are going down fast?

    I know I see my doctor again in 2 days, but your opinion is valued.

    - Pete
     
    • Hug Hug x 2
  2. PeteJR24

    PeteJR24 · Member

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    Also wanted to mention that my LDL was a little high, but everything else was normal on my blood tests.

    - Pete
     
  3. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Hi and welcome to the forum,

    If that finger prick test of 9.9 was an A1c (unusual in the UK. It is normally a venous blood draw) then you are definitely diabetic. 6.5% and over is diabetic in the UK.

    The fasting blood glucose test you had 11 months ago of 120 puts you in the pre-diabetic range at that time.

    Your pre-meal levels are in the diabetic range and a bit high, but not drastic.

    If it turns out you are Type 2 and not Type 1, then you have every chance of putting yourself in remission, but don't just cut out the junk food. All carbs turn to sugar once in the system, and this includes wholemeal so-called healthy options, and we also need to be careful with fruit and milk.

    Complications normally take a long time to appear. There is no way of knowing how long, or when, or even at all.

    I will tag @daisy1 for her excellent introductory post. Have a good read of it. Meanwhile, read round the forum and the main website (from the home button) and ask as many questions as you like.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. PeteJR24

    PeteJR24 · Member

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    Thank you for your response! The support helps!

    I tested 118 before lunch today. So, I went from 253 to 118 in 5 days. Not sure what it means, maybe a positive sign?
     
    • Winner Winner x 3
  5. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    That is a great improvement, well done. Still a bit high, but it is looking like you will get there. :)

    Do you also test after food? 2 hours after first bite should give you an instant indication of what that meal has done to your levels. You can also test earlier than 2 hours as well as 2 hours, to try and catch the peak. More than 36 at 2 hours and there are too many carbs in that meal. Used alongside a food diary, and recording your levels next to the food you had, will help enormously. With a good diet and a properly functioning pancreas, by 2 hours you should be almost back to where you started.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @PeteJR24 .

    it does seem so from the numbers, sadly.

    here is a chart from the home page of forum, you can enter your US scores
    or download a chart, that might help you see how well others using the MMOL system here in europe are doing.
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/blood-sugar-converter.html

    can you tell the damage mmhh ?

    We get tested here for eye damage and feet at diagnosis,

    i guess that might be a cost where you are.

    the foot test was pretty basic, i guess IF you closed your eyes, and a good friend COULD use a pencil to touch parts of your foot ,..you might well replicate the test i had...it was all about being able to FEEL..the issue being we might damage our foot and not notice, hence daily foot checks a good idea..(infections loves sugary blood, and can creep up fast, i believe)

    the eyes is a specialist test..( it's not the eyesight test opticians do, )
    they look for bleeds deep within the eye, so no you'd have to get that tested.

    Get numbers down..i would say a resounding YES.
    check so many signatures of posters on here for proof.

    semantics over reversed/cured etc.
    but definitely improved.
    however, going back to the full carb diet of previous, will imho entail the return of the T2D issues.
     
  7. PeteJR24

    PeteJR24 · Member

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    Bluetit1802, once the doctor gives me more than 90 lancets/test strips, I will test post meal more often. I was at 118 pre-lunch and 139 2 hours post-lunch (after I read your message). I'll have to start the diary and it sounds like I may of had too many carbs if my BS was 21 pts higher still 2 hours later.

    Thanks for your insight, JJrrak.
     
  8. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Your rise from before to after was less than 36mg/dl (2mmol/l) so quite good. Keep it up.
     
  9. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Very positive. You may find attached helpful and also the link below. Keep up the good work.

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/blood-sugar-converter.html
     

    Attached Files:

    #9 Debandez, Apr 17, 2019 at 10:54 PM
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019
  10. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @PeteJR24
    Hello Pete and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it both interesting and helpful.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 300,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  11. PeteJR24

    PeteJR24 · Member

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    UPDATE

    I went to the doctor on Friday and she said I definitely have diabetes. She thinks it may more so be a genetic predisposition because I also have acid reflux and allergies, although nobody in our family has it. It'll take a few days to find out if it is type 1 or type 2 through testing.

    I have to get checked out at an eye doctor, see a nutritionist and then see my primary care doctor every few months.

    My main concern was damage and future complications. She thinks I may have had this for 3 years max and damage typically begins around 5 years and I should not have future complications as long as I control this & should live till I'm 80. However, as I've read here, she did say there is always some chance in the future of a problem..

    My numbers last week went from 253 when I was diagnosed to 145 before breakfast, 115 before lunch and 145 before dinner. The last few days, I have been around 120 - 130 before all meals. I'll start to test 1 hour after meals and 2 hours after meals now (a lot of pricking!).

    I'll report back with how things are turning out..

    - Pete
     
  12. zauberflote

    zauberflote Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    @PeteJR24 welcome from a fellow Murrican! You can buy your own meter, lancets, and strips. I never even bothered with the script. If you live near a Kroger or Kroger family store, their store brand strips are about half the price of Rite Aid, CVS, didn't check Walgreen's. $11.99 for 50. And 100 packs are 22.99 I think.
    Keep up the good work -- your numbers have reduced spectacularly!
     
  13. PeteJR24

    PeteJR24 · Member

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    Hi All!

    I just got some test results. My kidney, thyroid and general tests like lipids (except for slightly high LDL) seem to all be good. However, I did receive my antibody test (GAD-65) and it showed 917.40 when it should be below 5. The doctor wrote "GAD antibodies elevated suggestive possibility of type one diabetes. Thyroid function is normal. Treatment is still the same. We'll discuss result during next appointment."

    My before meals BS ranges about 110 - 140. It is slowly lowering by a bit. However, I just started to test 1 hour and 2 hours after meals. Somebody told me that I should be no more than 36 pts higher on my 2 hour BS. I seem to be doing pretty well on that for breakfast and lunch. Dinner is another story...I have to figure out what will work because I am spiking 175 - 230.

    I think the doctor mentioned that I do not need to get my feet checked yet, but maybe that is because of my age (33) and possibly having it for 3 years or just that she did not want to overwhelm me yet?

    I'll keep you all updated.

    - Pete
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  14. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    I can't help with your GAD results as I know nothing about them.
    Did you also have a c-peptide test? This can indicate how much natural insulin you are making.
    Until you see your doctor again you are stuck with just the Metformin, which is so mild it doesn't help a great deal. Diet is the key for now.

    Are you doing anything to help yourself with these high post meal levels? Big rises like that mean there are too many carbs in that meal for your body to cope with as things stand. Have you reduced your carbs and eliminated some of the worst culprits? The worst culprits will be foods such as bread, rice, pasta, breakfast cereals, potatoes, fruit, take-aways and ready meals that have these foods in them, pastries, anything made with flour. If you do keep a food diary, including portion sizes, record your levels alongside the food and then examine what you have eaten.

    Perhaps tell us what you normally eat in a typical day and we can help you.
     
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