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No guidance

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Josie66, Apr 22, 2019.

  1. Josie66

    Josie66 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Diagnosed T2 Jan. On metformin slow release 2 tabs in eve. I cant get my waking BM below 9.5. I was diagnosed Jan and have had no guidance as to what i shouldnt eat. Everything is what Ive read myself. Should i have been sent on a course?
    Im not sure Ive made enough changes..plus its stupid but i honestly keep forgetting Im diabetic!!
     
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  2. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    As far as I know there are no courses for what to eat given by the NHS. Until a couple of years ago they did not acknowledge that food played much part in health. You are on your own.
     
  3. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    There is the DESMOND course. I was offered a place on this one but declined to attend. You could ask your GP or nurse about it. To be honest, from what I've heard it is just the EatWell Plate which is something you can learn online and dare I say it - may not be of great value to you.
     
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  4. enb54

    enb54 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My personal take on T2D is that you should monitor your own blood glucose before and after eating, then avoid anything that makes your blood glucose rise too high (my personal limit is 7.8 from a before reading of average 5.5). As I am not a good follower of my own advice, I'm not the one to be giving it, but I'm sure others will chime in. The bottom line of T2D is that if one wants to get better, then you at least have to take an active part in being part of the solution, and that definitely means avoiding/limiting high glycemic index (usually high carbohydrate) foods and drinks...
     
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  5. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    Around here the DESMOND course is called DEREK and run by a local charity. They had a graphic showing all kinds of foods to eat. It had a large portion of rice on it. They did not say why. When I asked them about food in cardboard boxes from supermarket freezers they looked at me as if I were mad. They had no answers.

    EDIT: I did see a dietitian who said I had to have carbohydrates with every meal and did I want another appointment.
     
  6. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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  7. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    You will receive very little useful guidance on what to eat from the NHS. They still push carbs with every meal. Carbs? All carbs turn to sugar once eaten, so why we are told to eat them is nonsensical. This includes the "healthy" whole meal varieties.

    Have a look at this site. You should get a good idea from this.
    https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/60-seconds

    and the lists of foods that are good, and ones to avoid (or cut down on)

    https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/foods#foodlist
    https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/foods#foodtoavoid

    I agree you need a blood glucose meter to help with your food choices. They are essential, in my opinion.
     
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  8. poemagraphic

    poemagraphic Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Josie
    Welcome to the site and the forums

    The above posts and links will give you a great starting place.
    Remember the people who post here mostly talk from experience.
    I have only been here a couple of weeks myself and have found out so much.
    It really is all about YOU! You have to understand what Type 2 is and how to control it.
    A meter is a MUST.

    Anything you are not certain about or just need reassurance this place is 'The' place to come to...
    So you are off to a great start.

    Po
     
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  9. enb54

    enb54 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This is not only nonsensical advice in the U.K. but nearly universal bad advice in the whole world. Why ever would a person who is a type 2 diabetic eat anything that makes their blood glucose go up significantly? I personally have bouts of stupidity but not for long, as I realize that I'm being incompetent and reverse my behaviour. Any dietary choice that lowers your blood sugars is the right choice for 99% of us with T2D, but there are always exceptions so never ever say 100%. An effective T2D treatment is something that actually helps, not something that requires more and higher dosages of medications.

    Sorry all, am standing on my soap-box, but most of the medical community is not listening to what actually works, just reaching for the pharmacology... OK, have finished my ranting...
     
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    #9 enb54, Apr 22, 2019 at 6:14 PM
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2019
  10. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    I ticked that I agree with you. If we could have two choices I would also have ticked winner.
     
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  11. Josie66

    Josie66 Type 2 · Active Member

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  12. Josie66

    Josie66 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I monitor my blood sugar..i wasnt told to do it by Gp or Nurse. I read here that its important to know what causes a spike so Im doing that. My waking/fasting BM has not been at a normal level since before Jan its
    Us usually 9 -10.5 so how do I get it down? The changes im making dont seem to be helping
     
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  13. LindsayJane

    LindsayJane Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I went on the DESMOND course - the stress of the day made my blood sugar shoot up! They gave us plastic food to play with and said that a dish of bangers, mash and beans was a wholesome meal and to be recommended for T2s! Look at dietdoctor.com for some good dietary advice and recipes. I echo what everyone else says here - the baddies to eat are carbs - and get yourself a blood glucose meter. It will help you to understand what foods cause your levels to go up and enable you to taylor your diet to suit you. Good luck with our journey x x

    Edit - Oops. Just read that you already have a meter - sorry x
     
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  14. mazza 2

    mazza 2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Josie, It's good that you are monitoring your blood sugars. Basically, it's about cutting out high carb foods or most carbs to be honest. Have a look at diet doctor website. It's full of some great advice and recipes. Can you let us know what your typical day's diet is, what do you have for breakfast, lunch and dinner. This will let people advise you how you can improve your levels. Do you know what your HBA1C is? It's not easy at first, it's a hugh learning curve, but once you get the hang of it, it's gets so much easier. You'll get there, just be patient.
     
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  15. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    Its all about what you are eating..... so what are you eating?
     
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  16. KookieMunchster

    KookieMunchster Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi!
    I am similarly new although I did attend TILT as my diagnosis was in end Feb this year and because the DN (Diabetic Nurse) said that people who went on this course had a better outcome in terms of managing their T2.

    Like someone else has mentioned it is essentially a talk about "Moderation" and the "Eat Well" plate.
    I really found it depressing. Just about everyone else there had been pre-diabetic but were now fully T2 and on several drugs. There was only myself and one other person that was actually doing anything about their diet.

    When I was asked what I had for breakfast I said I didn't have breakfast and the well meaning lady beside me chided me for missing the most important meal of the day.

    The idea of "Moderation" is too abstract to grasp for people who think that they can simply eat less of what they used to eat before.

    I also said that I monitored my own BG and the nurse/dietitian conducting the course said it wasn't necessary and not recommended even.

    That is not to say that I didn't learn anything.
    I learnt what I should have asked about in the first place when I got my diagnosis ie. what my blood test results were etc.. and that this course was not particularly helpful to people who helped themselves.

    You will find a lot more help here so don't fret you're in good company.
    All the best!
     
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  17. Richard'63

    Richard'63 Prefer not to say · Active Member

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    Hi @Josie66 Pretty much all I can do is repeat what the regulars on here say. Which is;

    I went on a DERIK course (last year) a year after I was diagnosed, they were still pushing carbs albeit brown and not white. Your digestive system turns almost all carbs into sugars, so whatever carbs you eat will raise your blood sugar levels.
    Look at dietdoctor.com and look up keto recipes, be prepared for differences in flavour or texture.
    If you can, try to raise your muscle mass (body weight exercises (can do at home) or weights), the extra muscle soaks up a little of the sugars, and evening walk will also help your fasting levels.
    As you have a monitor, check what individual foods do to you..

    Oh, and the one extra thing I would add, which doesn't show up in very often on here, is plan your food, and have food in the fridge ready and waiting for you, (boiled eggs, cheese, ham, whatever) this gives you something to eat instead of going hungry for ages and taking the quick and easy high carb foods.
     
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    #17 Richard'63, Apr 22, 2019 at 8:30 PM
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2019
  18. LindsayJane

    LindsayJane Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The 'agree' option should come with 'wholeheartedly' x
     
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  19. Josie66

    Josie66 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thank you for all your advice. X
     
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  20. sonia2016

    sonia2016 Type 2 · Member

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    Hi, I was referred for an Xpert course after diagnosis 3 years ago. Unfortunately it was not available for three months by which time I had found a very helpful online blog called bloodsugar101 by Jenny Ruhl, and already embarked on a modified Atkins diet. Ironically the course was presented by the same nurse who had given ineffective advice and failed to monitor me when I was diagnosed with prediabetes years before. However the book that accompanied the course was quite helpful and the other patients experience was enlightening. A low carb diet and and post meal blood sugar testing has reduced my HbA1c to within the normal range. Good luck to you.
     
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