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No testing

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Kevin10320, Oct 12, 2016.

  1. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    yes and we can do a lot ourselves , but first we have to take control...and the meter is a good way... then when after a while you know what excactly foods to eat , then you can maybe go back to only measuring 2 days a week (4-5 times a day) so you know it don´t get out of control again for you...
    If you can do long walks or excercise is ill be really good for you, but don´t mean you can eat sugar anyways... but I found that my mind has been better since I do not eat much carbs anymore... only about 70 grams... well sometimes 90grams , maybe you´ll experience the same... I have much more energy on lower carbs than I´d have thought
     
    #21 Freema, Oct 12, 2016 at 2:34 PM
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2016
  2. Kevin10320

    Kevin10320 · Well-Known Member

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  3. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @Kevin10320

    Hello Kevin and welcome to the forum :) Here is the basic information, mentioned above, which we give to new members and I hope this will help you to get started with testing which is very important. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 210,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  4. Kevin10320

    Kevin10320 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for your advice Freema
     
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  5. Kevin10320

    Kevin10320 · Well-Known Member

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    Many thanks Daisy ☺ appreciate the info ☺
     
  6. Kevin10320

    Kevin10320 · Well-Known Member

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    A big thank you to everyone who has offered advice. Appreciate it ☺
     
    #26 Kevin10320, Oct 12, 2016 at 2:51 PM
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2016
  7. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    A doctor has to prescribe something before it becomes free. If a doctor does not prescribe a meter, you cannot get one for free, whether on benefits or not. If a doctor decides you need to test, he may give you a meter and prescribe test strips, which would then be free. Meter manufacturers give GPs a load of meters to hand out for free, and the GP may give you one of these, but you will be a lucky man if he puts the test strips on prescription. No harm in asking though.
     
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  8. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to disagree but free prescriptions or benefits do not qualify someone with T2 for strips and lancets on prescription unless they are on insulin
     
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  9. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Good luck Kevin I am sure you will soon feel better it sounds like you are already on the right road as far as food is concerned. Cutting the starchy carbs and sugar stuff can really lower blood glucose so keep that up Yes testing can be an expense even with the cheapest strips when you are on a limited budget so I would say if you really can't afford to buy them then just keep low on the carbs it will make so much difference to you and see what others on here eat for some low carb meal ideas
     
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  10. RichPJ

    RichPJ Type 2 · Member

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    I was diagnosed last week and had my first clinic on monday - the nurse did keep using the phrase "because your levels are so high" but she did give me a free test kit and repeat prescriptions for the strips and lancets - i have been told to test 6 x a day though and keep a diary and im being monitored regularly - im not on benefits and still got it so def worth asking
     
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  11. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
    Retired Moderator

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    Please also be aware ( you may already know this!) that once you have been prescribed diabetes medication, you can get free prescriptions. The exemption form is available at your surgery. The exemption lasts 5 years and then needs another application.

    There are, of course, other reasons for exemption (age, certain benefits, certain health conditions), but i thought it worth mentioning, even though, as Bluetit says, you can't get a free prescription for something that isn't prescribed. :)

    In which case, please do save up and get that meter, then test to see the foods and portions that are sending your blood glucose up, so you can avoid them. You won't believe how much better you will feel. :D
     
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  12. ally1

    ally1 Type 2 · Expert

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    I am type2 and on benefits, and I was still denied a meter and strips from my nurse and doctor
     
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  13. Energize

    Energize Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My thoughts on it being a progressive disease is due to the 'professionals' keep telling diabetics to eat bread, potatoes, rice and pasta etc' and then prescribing more and more tablets to get your blood glucose levels down. So, more weight gain, due to the tablets, worse BGs so even more tablets, or even insulin. Thus, a progressive disease!!!

    So, cut the carbs, BGs come down, more control, less tablets and so much better control. Obviously, to control, a meter is necessary as, otherwise, how on earth can you know what foods you can eat without your BG going too high and for too long.

    Anyway, that's my perception of diabetes being called a 'progressive' disease ;)
     
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  14. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    "Post code lottery" regarding a T2 issued/prescribed a meter & strips..
    My T2 dad a pensioner (while he as alive.) taking Metformin was prescribed a meter. A pretty flashy one too. Accu-Chek Compact.
    Funny enough, he still had a meter when they pulled him off the met. But I had him sorted on a relatively LC by this time!
     
    #34 Jaylee, Oct 13, 2016 at 5:10 PM
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2016
  15. RichPJ

    RichPJ Type 2 · Member

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    @Jaylee mines a pretty flashy one too - its the freestyle optimum neo and all the reads can be downloaded to a pc and can track trends and keep notes on what is what
     
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  16. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Just out of curiosity.. Would you be fortunate to live in the Bath & Norht east Somerset area perchance?
     
  17. Kevin10320

    Kevin10320 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you ... I have now got a machine and will be testing a couple of times a day.
    Thank you for your response ☺
     
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  18. Kevin10320

    Kevin10320 · Well-Known Member

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    I live in Suffolk in East Anglia
     
  19. Catlady19

    Catlady19 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Most of us T2's have found that the medics are reluctant to give us meters and strips on the NHS. Have a look at a SD Codefree they are not too expensive and the strips are reasonable. Even if you test once a week it would help you.
    If you have only been diagnosed a month ago, you will still feel poorly. It takes a little while for the medicine to kick in and your body to adjust. I still felt tired for quite a while after diagnosis but it does lift. It sounds as though you are doing the right things though, so keep it up! Don't lose heart. Stick to low carb and come to the forum for questions and advice. Good luck.
     
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  20. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    @Kevin10320 - Hi :). Always remember to wash your hands before every test you do. It might help if you were to record your meter readings before and 2 hours after eating, plus the contents of the meal. In doing this you will be able to see what foods raise your blood sugars and which to avoid and those that don't raise your bloods. :)
     
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