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self-harming by overeating high carb food or sugar

Discussion in 'Other Health Conditions and Diabetes' started by apple123, Feb 12, 2015.

  1. Pipp

    Pipp Type 2 · Expert
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    Sorry for late response to this.
    The title of the thread caught my eye.

    'Self-harming'. That is exactly what this is, and I believe only those who have done something similar can truly understand.
    Solutions offered:
    Explaining how bad it is for you....I guess you already know that. Your symptoms, wakefulness, thirst and feeling ill are a reminder.

    Telling you not to do it..... Well if only it was that simple.

    Telling you to have will power, hmmm, here I don't think it is a case of falling off a wagon, or giving in to temptation, or being weak willed. It is, as you say, a form of self harm. So anyone doing it needs to be able to work out the reason why they choose to self harm. And that is not easy, because when and if you do work that out you have to decide what you are going to do about those reasons.

    For many who indulge in this behaviour it is a feeling that they have failed at something or other. Others want to punish themselves. Some it is a coping mechanism for when life is stressful. I am sure there are plenty of other reasons. I have known people who have said their need to binge eat junk foods seems to take over and they are not able to be rational about it. I have experienced feelings like that too.

    I am guessing that when anyone eats in an uncontrolled way they eat alone. Many people with self harm eating behaviour do this, and appear to have normal eating patterns when they are with other people.

    Solutions? I think we each have to work on what is best for us. If it is emotional eating then try to be honest with oneself to face exactly what, who, when where and why those emotions are occurring. If the urge to eat the sort of foods and the quantities we know are not good for us happens when we are alone, then try not to be alone for any length of time, keep busy, get out of situations and locations where the opportunity to indulge in this behaviour can arise. If possible, confide in someone you trust and tell them what you are doing. Difficult I know because of the shame attached.

    Unfortunately, it may be that you need to eat the wrong things sometimes to cope with negative emotions. If that happens, try to limit the frequency of occurrences, the quantity of food and do not feel guilty.
     
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  2. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Life's a *****.
    In all manner of ways what's good for us is boring what's bad for us is tempting.
    It's an easy wagon to fall off.
    Don't let it ruin your journey.
    Pick your self up dust your self down and get back on that wagon.

    Three wheels on my wagon
    and I'm still riding along
    The carbohydrates are after me but
    I'm singing this happy song ....





    I'll get me coat.
     
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  3. Arab Horse

    Arab Horse Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well Apple123, I fell off the wagon last night, I usually try to be good but blew it yesterday evening. I had a big bowl of chopped up fruit and cream. The fruit would have gone off if left much longer so I need to stop buying any! I didn't test afterwards as I didn't want to know but I will try not to do it again. I am usually quite good but get disheartened when I still have high levels in the evenings. Maybe the ND will sort that out. Plan to start it in a week's time.
     
  4. alicemason

    alicemason Type 2 · Active Member

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    I have been struggling . Eating everything and anything . I have also been feeling very thirsty . Tired very unwell but I still do it even though I know it can't carry on. Iv been putting my head in the sand thinking maybe it will go away I haven't been checking my bloods or anything. The first couple of weeks after I was diagnosed I done realky well god my sugar levels down I was diagnosed with diabetes type 2 last September. I know how bad it can get as my mum died of it yet I can't seem to sort myself out. Wish I could
     
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  5. Erin85

    Erin85 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi apple123, you're not alone. I've had quite a few sugar binges despite being less than 3months diagnosed and starting off so well. I felt guilty during my binges and knew it wasn't going to solve anything, but couldn't stop myself. I've been open about this struggle with friends and family and (grudgingly) given away my favourite sweeties. I keep a to-do list and after dinner try to do things from the list and keep busy. Stops me munching and keeps my body active. I wish you all the best x
     
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  6. DeejayR

    DeejayR Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    @alicemason Hello Alice, what have you been up to? I read through your postings since you joined and nothing seems to be going right for you. Is there something else we can tell you to put you on the right track? Something is blocking your way forward. You deserve to feel better, you really do.
     
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  7. a.harris

    a.harris Type 2 · Member

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    Yep I've had some moments when I've thrown low carb diet out of the window but we are only human important thing is to get back onto healthy eating plan...... Try to remain positive and strong but we are all entitled to slip occasionally
     
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  8. a.harris

    a.harris Type 2 · Member

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    To Jackthelad, very inspiring words...
     
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  9. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've had a bit of a couldn't care less weekend because I have been feeling really unwell.
    For me though it's been spuds and pastry and sponge pudding and bread and custard and and .....
    My readings don't seem to have suffered much but I suffer from tiredness and unquenchable thirst and peeing through the night when I fall off the wagon.
    The sugar effect may well be delayed till later.
    I think I have a bladder infection again.
     
  10. conniecar

    conniecar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Don't beat yourself up. I've had 39 years of sometimes being good and then swinging the other way. It's instilled in us,with good reason, to be good diabetics, but the anger I've felt on being patronised by yet another doctor is huge. I always think 'walk in my shoes....' Blah blah.The feeling I've 'got away with it again' after a 9 month check up is only understandable to other diabetics . Get this, I have a terrible, psychologically mixed up habit of buying a packet of jelly babies, but throwing half of them in the bin. No one can preach, it's your battle and an invisible one to most, so be kind to yourself and know you're not alone. Diabetes is exceptionally boring, and very fickle at times. There's no right way, just do your best. I'm a Sagittarius first, then a diabetic so refuse to be defined by it, get yourself on the wagon and focus on getting a positive outlook
     
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  11. lessci

    lessci Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've been struggling to recently, final got a decent reduction in my Ac1 at my last test, and it's all gone to pot since then, I'm good all day, then it falls to pieces in the evening and my levels have shot back up again, it's not even just the starchy carbs, cake, chocolate and sweets have all featured recently. Every week I intend to restart my modified ND again, then it just doesn't happen (the I'll start tomorrow syndrome!) and I know when I go for my Ac1 next month the levels will have increased and my DN will want to know why
     
  12. Arab Horse

    Arab Horse Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Are you eating all the forbidden things in the evening because you are hungry or because you are trying to be good during the day? If so, make sure you plan your evening meal so you are not mondering what to have. Chicken breast/pork or lamb chop/steak with beans and some green veg (with a little sprinkle of cheese) will be very filling and won't spike your BG. Then do something to take your mind off food. You will no longer be hungry and can then tell yourself that you don't want the goodies. Is there anyone with you who can motivate you?

    I know it is difficult; I have to watch my husband eat all the things I can't; donuts, chocolate, biscuits, crisp etc. but I just have to remind myself of the consequences of not sticking to my diet. I would rather be healthy than eat what I shouldn't. I do occasionally tell myself "What the hell" and have a few chocolates but it is only very occasionally as I know they are harming me. I reserve my "binge" for a few chocolates and resist the bread, potatoes, pasta, pizza (occasionally have a slice and leave the base), rice, cereals (do miss my bran flakes for breakfast) and the other things I know I can't eat. I really, really miss my fruit but that too sends my BG way too high so I have my grapefruit in the morning (had that for years) as it doesn't seem to affect me and occasional a few blueberris but I so long for a nice crisp apple, chunk of pineapple or some grapes but just have to tell myself NO.
     
  13. JenniferW

    JenniferW Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've recently been diagnosed with T2D, and talking with the diabetic nurse about my binge eating / compulsive overeating, she said it was going to be something we'd have to work with. I've been a life-long overeater, but around 6 years ago became a compulsive overeater / binge eater. I've tried various approaches, with a small amount of improvement, but would appreciate help and suggestions from anyone who's been successful in dealing with it. The T2D diagnosis has definitely increased my motivation, but so far, there are no miracles!
     
  14. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi and welcome to the forum.

    Many people find that their binges are triggered by eating high GI, highly processed carbohydrate foods. You may find that by adopting a lower carb diet the binges are easier to control. The advantage is that such a diet also helps a lot with blood glucose control.

    You may find the following link helpful in explaining the carb craving effect:
    http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/lowcarbliving/a/Food-Cravings.htm
     
  15. JenniferW

    JenniferW Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm on a low-carb diet (I've been reading David Cavan's 'Reverse your diabetes'), but still have problems in the evenings. I'm also an ex-smoker, and I'd say what drives this is more like that than anything else. Because I did manage to give up smoking (decades ago), I assume it's going to be possible to change this habit - eventually.
     
  16. GoRachel1989

    GoRachel1989 Type 1 · Active Member

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    I have fallen off the wagon a few times already, and it's only been a month... one time was at a small social gathering. I've also been experimenting a bit with different foods, as well as matching my insulin to my meals - basically trying to figure out different ways to enjoy my treats without screwing up my blood sugar too much. The trouble is in not overdoing it - that takes some willpower. Because it is mostly trial and error, I do wind up getting occasional spikes in my blood sugar, from occasional "errors." It can be a real mood-killer. I see all these posts about low carb diets, but I don't see that being very feasible for me to maintain, personally. However, I am still interested in learning about the different ways in which people manage their diabetes.

    Boredom and depression has started to kick in - a terrible combo that definitely doesn't help with the food urges... I get especially hungry during the evening/nighttime hours. Sometimes I give in and eat more than I should... I have been doing it more nowadays, as opposed to when I had just come out of the hospital.
     
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  17. vintageutopia

    vintageutopia Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Diabetes isn't fair. I think many of us have those moments where we ask "why me" or wish that we didn't have to think about every single morsel we put in our mouths.

    I have a friend that says "Pick your hard". In other words, do you pick your hard now, when you have the chance to change your diet and reverse or minimize your condition? Or do you pick your hard later, when you are battling complications from diabetes, repeat hospital admissions, pain & heartache?

    Diabetes is hard. There is no easy route. Pick your hard.
     
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  18. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Mine is 'Hobsons choice'

    What that means is I don't get one!
    It is not my decision, either I go with the low carb lifestyle or I'm very ill! It is not somewhere I want to be!
    I can't fall off the wagon, because, it is self harming, really badly, if I do! And very difficult to get back on it!
    So I just don't!

    By the way, 'temptation's bout to get you' by the Temptations. Is on my player now!
     
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  19. Larissima

    Larissima Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have only relatively recently admitted to myself that I am a compulsive overeater (at reaching a BMI of 40!), and I can recommend a book that really helped me understand the reasons why and deal with all my excuses. It's an ongoing process, obviously, but I've benefited a lot from reading "Eating Less" by Gillian Riley. She also has a website with additional articles, but the book goes into much more depth. I recommend it wholeheartedly!
     
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  20. JenniferW

    JenniferW Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the recommendation. I've read a lot on this in the past, been through counselling, was a member of OA for a time, all with no long term success although I'm no longer at my worst. In a way, being diagnosed as T2 has opened a door to new ways of seeing it and I feel more optimistic about getting to grips with it.
     
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