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Teenage daughter complications

Discussion in 'Parents' started by DeeGem, Apr 25, 2019.

  1. DeeGem

    DeeGem · Member

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    Hi my daughter is 14 and diagnosed 10 years now. She is currently fighting high levels throughout the day and hypo during the night. Her clinic has admitted her 3 times into hospital and have the same problem. They tested her for pregnancy, blamed her for over injecting now over eating . It's been a nightmare. I check her 2 to 3 times a night around working fulltime is a battle.
    When I increase her morning levimer I have to reduce her bedtime levimer . Novorapid ratios are very tight as it is. Totally stuck and so are the diabetic team. Has anyone else had the same problem with teenage girls and hormones/ puberty. Thanks
     
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  2. endocrinegremlin

    endocrinegremlin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ask for a libre or gcm trial. It sounds like your daughter may have dawn phenomenon which is upsetting her levels. I went through the exact same thing as a teen and it was horrendous. Have your team tried basal testing to make absolutely sure her ratios are spot on? Levemir might not be the right insulin for you. Ask about humulin for example.
     
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  3. alphabeta

    alphabeta Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Humulin or Tresiba or Lantus
     
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  4. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I think you need to have a word with whoever is in charge of the team when your daughter is in hospital. Accusations of misuse or misbehaviour tend to set up antagonism between patient and health care professional which are unhelpful to say the least.
    All the times I have been accused of similar behaviour after struggling to lose weight have definitely coloured my attitude.
     
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  5. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Maybe I'm being stupid here, but has no one considered putting her on a pump? Then she could reduce the night time basal and increase the day time basal.
     
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  6. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Considering the high risk for teenage girls of eating disorders (and the even higher risk for T1 ones), I would be totally livid if a doctor spoke like that to my daughter. Your team sound dreadful. I suppose there is no other clinic within reach???
     
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  7. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    @DeeGem The care your daughter has received is appalling, a complaint is required, this kind of treatment can influence negative behaviours and is not acceptable, so sorry to hear your daughter has been treated this way.

    I agree with Ellie, a pump would overcome this scenario as you can change background ratios rough the day and night and it would eliminate the highs and lows with some careful adjustments, it's only using novorapid and is the most sensible idea yet would be a massive game changer for your daughters control, I appreciate she may possibly be self conscious but it's easily hidden and easy to use once training has been given, please ask about getting access to one as it sounds like this is greatly affecting your quality of life, also as she is still considered a child getting access now would be far easier than if she were an adult.
     
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  8. DeeGem

    DeeGem · Member

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    Thank you. They did discharge her with dawn phenomenon but kept her on the same insulin and regime . I had to up and down ratios myself over a period of time to correct her. But now they say shes on far to much insulin. I feel for you all, I really do.
     
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  9. DeeGem

    DeeGem · Member

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    Its caused so much tension between the both of us. They have no answers so accusations are getting thrown about . These people do not live with this we do. Clinic in 2 weeks time so I will be saying we are unhappy. I've been far to forgiven I guess .
     
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  10. DeeGem

    DeeGem · Member

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    They have although this was a few years ago. Before all this hormones and puberty. I will maybe try talk about it more to Rachel and see how she feels. Anything is better than how she must be feeling just now. Ellie thank you
     
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  11. DeeGem

    DeeGem · Member

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    Tell me about it . I give this health professions so much respect and get none back. Your absolutely right. It does effect her . She sometimes wont eat certain things because she is sick of being accused .
     
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  12. DeeGem

    DeeGem · Member

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    Thank you. She is self conscious. But it sounds the way forward . Honestly, going to clinic is dreadful sometimes. Always blaming something other than the real reason. Her levels are worse around her period but they think shes eating out her diet and have asked me to take control of every injection . We have clinc in 2 weeks so I will ask about the pump. Thank you for your help x
     
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  13. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    To be honest their treatment of her is shocking, stand up to them and make a complaint, many type 1 females get issues around the time of the month, myself included, it's based on the hormone in-balance before menstruation, it's common knowledge on this forum, so please tell her from us it's not her fault, poor lass doesn't need to be told it's her fault how demoralising, I had a fairly heated discussion with a GP when I was fairly newly diagnosed as I'd recognised a consistent pattern before my period and wanted advice, the GP told me categorically that my period would not affect my levels and tried to point the blame at other things, I told him that if he lived in my body he would understand but he really didn't have a clue and we left at loggerheads and me feeling a bit disillusioned with GPS after that.

    Get onto them about the pump but be persistent and don't back down :)
     
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  14. DeeGem

    DeeGem · Member

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    No, your so right. I've had enough. Sleepless nights and the worry is unbearable. Thank you so much. Shes my daughter and like you say her body and she lives with it. Fingers crossed I get somewhere now with a little force and standing my ground x
     
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  15. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, @DeeGem , I'd second @endocrinegremlin 's suggestion of asking for a libre or cgm trial.

    Cgm is a continuous glucose monitor. A small sensor is put on the arm, measures bg every 5 mins, sends it to a phone app, so she'll get a continuous 24 hr graph trace to see exactly what bg has been and is doing. Can also input bolus and carb amounts to see the effects of those. The phone can be set up to ring if going too high or low, so the user gets a heads up on whether they need to do something. Libre can be set up with a little gizmo to do that too.

    There seems to be lots of unexplained hypos and hypers going on with your daughter's bg.

    It can be very difficult to identify the reasons for those if she's just using strips - they just give a brief glimpse of a point in time. It's like fighting in the dark.

    With cgm, though, as you can see the full 24 hr picture, it's waaay easier to see what's going on, and take steps to steer it to mitigate/ mimimise highs and lows before they happen. And look back at the past history to see if there are any recurring patterns, which lets you think ahead about ways to stitch them.

    Before I got cgm, there was a lot of things happening with my T1 that I just couldn't figure out. It frustrated me.

    After cgm, it just became much, much easier to look at the graphs, and say, right, ok, I can see now what's going on here, and then start steering it.

    You and your daughter are sounding confused and uncertain at the moment. T1 is an unpredictable, difficult thing to manage.

    Pretty much everyone who has used either libre or cgm says it makes it much, much easier, because you can see what it is doing, and then figure out ways to fix the bad bits.

    I'd strongly encourage you and her to ask her team about scripting libre or cgm for her - there's a fair chance it will make a lot of the unexplainable things happening at the moment a lot more understandable, and, more importantly, also see ways of changing doses, ratios, pre-bolusing, basal, dextrotab nudges, etc. etc. to fix them. It makes the game much fairer.

    If you've got a kindle, get a copy of Sugar Surfing by Stephen Ponder to get a clearer idea of what cgm brings to the game.

    Good luck!
     
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  16. bobcurly

    bobcurly Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes been accused of that as well. They put my daughter on a pump with a sensor and I upload data every few weeks. It has kept things more stable although takes time to fine tune the basal rates. Good luck
     
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  17. DeeGem

    DeeGem · Member

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    We have been offered it on prescription, we have been told we need to go through training program first to qualify for it on prescription. So will get that date organised once they have set dates.
    Never been so confused. I do adjust accordingly to what I see going on as clinic just doesnt seen to help. Thank you for your great advice. Hormone stage is hard going. Hopefully have a break through with everyone's great advice.
     
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  18. DeeGem

    DeeGem · Member

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    @bobcurly it's awful isnt it. Makes you feel an inadequate parent. I parent to the fullest and made to feel like I dont. My daughter made to feel like shes some terrible teenager not following her regime . Which she is. I watch her like a hawk.
    Thanks for the good luck. Hope your daughter is well
     
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  19. bobcurly

    bobcurly Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    There is a limit to how closely you can watch them. In our case the severe hypos led to nocturnal fits and emergency admissions. Then having to face the consultant after a night on the ward looking very haggard. I do sympathise with you. The pump has been a game changer in the long run but was very frustrating to start with. Good luck x
     
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  20. DeeGem

    DeeGem · Member

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    Up 2 or 3 times a night some nights is just no use. Cant go on. I really appreciate your advice. Thank you . Hope your child is doing great . Just need to bring Rachel round in her way of thinking about the pump now. x
     
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