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Teenage son won't do his insulin

Discussion in 'Children & Teens' started by Davidcharles, Jul 24, 2019.

  1. Davidcharles

    Davidcharles Family member · Member

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    Yeah I toke him to clinic we can't make all appointments as the clinic is 30miles away and I have to take time off work . This isn't a problem for me but he has to take the time for his work to . He is in transition from youth clinic to adult clinic same team just different building . Unfortunately we missed his last appointment as a simple fact I could not park anywhere near as building work was being carried out but I'm hopping to get him to clinic soon and il explain everything to them
     
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 1
  2. slip

    slip Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    wow! I'm sorry but that is, as far as I'm concerned, a poor excuse not to go, especially as your boy is having trouble - I would have at least dropped him at the clinic and said go in and be seen and I'll find some where else to park and catch you up.

    I know it probably isn't as simple as that but I can only take what you say at face value so please don't be offended or upset at my comment we are all here to help you out of a difficult situation. ;)
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  3. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    As a couple of people have suggested, If he will even wear a Libre, that really might help. You would need to find out first if he is even willing though. But I remember the fixation with watching it at the beginning and what it was doing. I still am with my current CGM! But maybe that would get him interested again?
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  4. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Sorry to hear about your son's issues @Davidcharles what an awful position for you to be in as a parent.

    Maybe see if you can get him to join here, maybe talking to other type 1's will help him open up ? It's an isolating condition and with pressures of teenage years, new job and great upheaval, talking would help, but of course if you can get him to talk more about what's going on, I find the easiest way to have difficult conversations is to go for a walk, it's non confrontational as you walk side by side and can feel less judged, maybe if you can find out what's going on internally then you can work through this.
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  5. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just wondering is there a reason he’s doing it? Like has he been bullied or had comments at his school, college or work or both?
    During my school years I rarely controlled my diabeties due to being the only Diabetic and just didn’t fit in and also used to get bullied for it. I had a reason but eventually I decided to go back as I kept getting violent and creating damages to the point it caused a couple of issues with security/police becuse it was affecting my behaviour and causing me to take it out on people I don’t like, as I was always high, However I ended up talking to someone and that made it better and am still working on getting it back on control
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  6. Harry potter1

    Harry potter1 · Member

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    Hi if you don’t trust your son to do his own insulin you should invest in the Dexcom system because the CGM has the ability to connect to other devices so you can watch his blood sugar.
     
  7. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    Libre link allows similar viewing on other devices. However being able to see that insulin is not being taken is not quite the same as finding a solution to the issue.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Davidcharles Reading this makes me realise what my parents must have gone through. I was diagnosed at 11 months and like your son, began to push The Monster away, especially in my teenage years. The following starts when I was about your son's age:
    I have no recollection of any hypos while I was at senior school, probably because I was poorly controlled throughout my time there. One of the doctors at Southlands Hospital, Shoreham-by-Sea, wrote to me saying:
    Dear Grant,
    Further to your visit to the Diabetic Clinic last week, I have noted that your blood sugar was 26mmol again, which I feel is rather high.

    At the time I was affected by a teenage resentment of my condition, ignoring outside opinion, and completely lacking any awareness of the significance of any information. As I write this [in 2009] I can see all kinds of interference on the computer screen caused by retinopathy: I am unable to keep my hands steady (not because of alcohol); and I am aware that my kidneys are struggling to survive. All this was wrapped up in those few words in the above letter. Throughout my life I have been regularly reminded, either through personal contacts, diabetic journals, visits to clinics, or through books, that all diabetics run these risks and that the condition, if unmanaged, can be fatal. Why is it that teenagers happily (?) ignore these warnings? On several occasions in the last thirty years I have been contacted by doctors, asking me whether I would be prepared to talk to a sixteen year old who is ignoring advice. Of course I would. Could they get in touch with me? On each occasion, nobody has telephoned. I think at this stage in life, when hormones are unruly, faces look like Spotted **** with a hairy frame, girls (or boys) are worryingly important, sexuality is uncertain, parents are a bloody menace and so on, the last thing a person needs is an uncomfortable label. I never wanted to talk about it. I’ve more than made up for it now. I have been able to manage The Enemy far more effectively since I have been prepared to discuss it. But, even at the age of twenty this can be daunting.

    Your son is going through the same process as millions have before. By the time I reached 20 I had bleeding in my eyes and my kidneys had started a slow downhill path until I had to have a kidney/pancreas transplant 6 years ago. I still have good eyesight and only wear reading glasses. Since 2013 I have not been allowed to run, hop, skip or dance because of Charcot foot, a condiotion that can result in diabetes that can cause your foot or ankle to collapse.
    I was 21 when this occurred:
    During one of my ophthalmologist's consultations in my second year he asked me about my life. I told him that I was living in Kensal Rise; that I cycled into King’s College in the Strand every day; that I played squash; and that I drank moderately (I’m sure he didn’t fall for this). His response was that I should stop burn-ups on the Edgeware Road, that I should avoid squash, moderate my alcohol intake, and that I should shun aerobic exercise or anything that would make me red in the face. If I did not heed his words, I would be blind by the time I reached twenty-three.
    “Thank you” I said. “Do you realise that in one sentence you have ruled out all the finer points of living?”

    The reason I have included all this is so that you might feel better about your son's future even though he appears not to care. I'm sure he does, but he feels angry, yet safe to shout at his nearest and dearest. I hope he will adjust himself abruptly when it dawns on him that there is really only one path to take. Good luck
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
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