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Too Much Fish

Discussion in 'Food, Nutrition and Recipes' started by wiseowl_123, Nov 5, 2016.

  1. wiseowl_123

    wiseowl_123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Good morning I am quite a new member with Type 2 diabetes,not testing yet,am I doing the right thing by eating fish every day,,ie Fresh salmon,yekkow haddock,kippers for breakfast and sardines,salad and fruit,is it possible to eat to much fish as I really enjoy it,but is everyday to much,my first review is in 2 months,thank you for reading my post:)
     
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  2. Did someone tell you that you need to eat fish every day?
     
  3. mist

    mist · Guest

    Fish is yummy! Have at it..:woot:
     
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  4. wiseowl_123

    wiseowl_123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello No its just that its a good part of a diabetics diet as far as I can gather,but I am new to diabetes
     
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  5. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Yeah that's fine if you like fish then go for it.. the fattier the better.
     
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  6. wiseowl_123

    wiseowl_123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you @bulkbiker my friend its so confusing as I have read somewhere that there are toxins in fish and I was alittle concerned.
     
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  7. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Fish is good for you @wiseowl_123 , here's what the NHS Choices website says about fish consumption:

    How much oily fish should I eat?
    We should eat at least one portion (around 140g when cooked) of oily fish a week.

    Oily fish can contain low levels of pollutants that can build up in the body. For this reason, there are maximum recommendations for the number of portions we should be eating each week. These recommendations are different for different groups of people:

    • The general population is advised to have no more than four portions of oily fish a week.
    • Women who are planning a pregnancy or who are currently pregnant or breastfeeding should eat no more than two portions of oily fish a week. This is because pollutants found in oily fish may affect the future development of a baby in the womb.
    • Children, pregnant women and women who are trying to get pregnant should not eat swordfish, as it contains more mercury than other fish. Other adults are advised to eat no more than one portion of swordfish per week.
    http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/fish-shellfish.aspx
     
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  8. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    fish is a very fine diet for diabetics , and only if you eat very much fatty fish of the bigger kinds you will get a lot of toxins/pollutioning stuff into your body... because the higher the fish is in the food chain the worse it is polluted from all the other fish it eats besides the general polution in the seas...
    herring is quite a small fish not so high in the food chain but still very fatty and maximum healthy if you want to eat fatty fish more than once a week..

    the pollution is most dangerous in girls who haven´t gotten their children yet (as the pollution of the worst kind stays in the body and raises when eating more and more) and in childbearing women and breatsfeeding women... as the polution can damage the featus somewhat when doing some brain/nerve damage in the unborn or newborn child who´s brain and nervesystem are not finnished in building yet.. the pollution affects the featus and newborn children the most. http://www.nwf.org/Wildlife/Threats-to-Wildlife/Pollutants/Mercury-and-Air-Toxics.aspx
    "cognitive thinking, memory, attention, language, and fine motor and visual spatial skills may be affected in children who were exposed to methylmercury as foetuses."

    "The second group is people who are regularly exposed (chronic exposure) to high levels of mercury (such as populations that rely on subsistence fishing or people who are occupationally exposed). Among selected subsistence fishing populations, between 1.5/1000 and 17/1000 children showed cognitive impairment (mild mental retardation) caused by the consumption of fish containing mercury. These included populations in Brazil, Canada, China, Columbia and Greenland."
    http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs361/en/
    a servere pollution with Mercury of the fish and shelfish in the japanes town Minamata(1968) caused severe cases suffering brain damage, paralysis, incoherent speech and delirium.; http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs361/en/


    people who have gotten their children don´t have to think as much of it as those who are going to have children if they don´t care much of pollution.. and maybe living shorter or having a bit lower intelligence than they could possibly have had ;)
    "Mammals have impaired motor skills that affect their ability to hunt and find food." according to http://www.nwf.org/Wildlife/Threats-to-Wildlife/Pollutants/Mercury-and-Air-Toxics.aspx
     
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    #8 Freema, Nov 5, 2016 at 11:58 AM
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2016
  9. Chrisle68

    Chrisle68 · Well-Known Member

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    The fish thing lol Its mainly in Salmon that have it Its call (pcbs) Its where salmon are bread in farm's. Something to do with gene pool as brother and sister from the same mother and it's repeated over and over again bit like inbreading Plus dead salmon are used as food to feed them.
    And you have to eat lot to be affected by it and I mean a lot
     
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    #9 Chrisle68, Nov 5, 2016 at 12:09 PM
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2016
  10. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    Enjoy your fish! Just don't have the same thing every day. Variety is always good. So a nice mix of different fish, served in different ways. For instance, I don't think luminous yellow smoked haddock every day is a good idea, but a nice ramble through non-luminous haddock, sardines, salmon, cod, whitebait and mackerel... that sounds fab. :D
     
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    #10 Brunneria, Nov 5, 2016 at 12:15 PM
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2016
  11. jonbvn

    jonbvn Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Freema i have to call you on that last paragraph. It is quite objectionable.
     
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  12. wiseowl_123

    wiseowl_123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  13. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    Fish is generally good for you, but there have been warnings about eating too much, Those especially marked out are Swordfish, and tuna due to mercury buildup. Recently, farmed salmon has had bad press, and shellfish can be dodgy if not fresh or allowed to detox before cooking. Trout can be a problem sometimes but recent methods of preparation and transport seem to have reduced the risks.

    Most of the don't eat this fish stories are linked to conservation issues and stock depletion, rather than health issues, but here is increasing evidence of pcbs replacing mercury in the chemical buildup category, especially where fish are caught close to river estuaries

    Edit to add: I forgot to mention that smoked fish is not the best to eat, but tasty in small doses. Modern curing methods add a lot of chemicals and colourants and these are a poor substitute for oak smoke. It is a time problem the manufacturers get around by spray painting the fish with a cocktail of makeup and smellies to fool the public.
     
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    #13 Oldvatr, Nov 5, 2016 at 12:26 PM
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2016
  14. mist

    mist · Guest

    @mist :p

    Your welcome..
     
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  15. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    I currently have a running battle with my husband (who is "in charge" of online shopping) over mackerel - Tesco have both fresh & smoked varieties and after a short spell when he ordered the fresh for me, he now flatly refuses to do so and I get anything from evasion to downright lies about why I haven't received any each week ... and I usually end up with the smoked instead which I certainly neither ask for or want all the time. :mad::banghead::banghead:

    Robbity
     
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  16. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    I shop in Aldi where they do piri piri mackerel in the chill cabinet. Also mucked around with and processed, but highly palatable. Good thing is that it is enjoyed by all in the family, so I get LCHF, and the Carboholics get fed too without noticing. Not done online though
     
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  17. wiseowl_123

    wiseowl_123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Good afternoon I had 2 poached eggs on Bergen soya and linseed toasted one slice 1 galss of water

    .For lunch 3 kippers,Brocolli,Cauliflower,green beans,Romaine lettuce,1 glass of water

    at 4'oclock I shall have a cox's apple and a small pear for a snack
     
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  18. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    can you eat fruit without getting very high in numbers ?
    I hope you didn´t eat the fruits at the same snacktime...
    for diabetes berries are a better choice because they don´t spike as much,,, of cause depending of the amount too...
     
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  19. asparagusp

    asparagusp · Guest

    I think eating fish two/three times a week is the norm! Eating more might impact upon your thyroid. As for fruit, take a reading afterwards and then decide whether to limit yourself to one per snack or none! Take care.
     
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  20. wiseowl_123

    wiseowl_123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you @Oldvatr many thanks my friend.
     
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