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Trust me... Type1 and Type2 diagnosed today. Why does my health problems have to be so convoluted???

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by ickihun, Sep 20, 2019.

  1. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Told today I'm type1 and type2 .

    Oh come on. Why so complex?
    Every part of my life has been conflicted with health conditions and their needs.
    I don't think I believe this til I've took my weight loss to a manageable BMI. Then we'll see what's what.

    What would you do..... 3mths after bariatric keyhole surgery and just looking to getting menstrual cycle regulated but pain in back which has been diagnosed as pinched nerve and scatica still very disabilitating after 4st loss and still losing from my morbibly obese body?
    Of which takes a while longer to settle my new system down. I know for sure.
    All pending a back/pelvic x-ray on Monday too.
     
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  2. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    :wideyed:..so TOO much insulin circulating V no insulin circulating...
    how is that even possible..:wtf:

    poor @ickihun ..i do feel for ya.

    fantastic recovery for the surgery, going great guns,
    and now they come up with this...Hope it's an error
    and it's just a by product of the body recovering from the bariatric surgery.

    Sounds like you took it well,
    hope it all resolves for the better soon.
     
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  3. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Type 1 is antibody positive and c-peptide below 0.2 nmol/l. Type 2 is high c-peptide and insulin resistance. You can't be high and low c-peptide at the same time. It sounds like you need to be referred to a specialist for a another opinion.
     
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  4. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Type 2 doesn't necessarily have to present as too much insulin. Although hyperinsulinemia is largely considered to be the aetiology of T2, there may come a time when endogenous insulin production drops off a cliff. Either before or after the diagnosis of hyperglycaemia. At this stage the individual is both insulin resistant, and simultaneously insulin deficient. Somewhere in amongst all that, it's not impossible to also develop an autoimmune response that would classify a type 1 diagnosis.

    Type 2s can become insulin deficient, and type 1s can become insulin resistant. The two are not mutually exclusive and can coexist. I prefer to think of all of this as two sliding scales of resistance and deficiency, plus a possible autoimmune element to confound things further. This is surely why in some cases the doctors and endos have such a hard time pinpointing an exact diagnosis. Maybe sometimes there really isn't one?

    All of the above is merely my understanding, not necessarily fact. @ickihun it sounds like you've really been put through the wringer. Onwards and upwards though eh? Hopefully things improve for you.
     
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    #4 Jim Lahey, Sep 20, 2019 at 7:39 PM
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2019
  5. Fndwheelie

    Fndwheelie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    From what I’ve understood from my time on the forum, (may not necessarily be correct,) type 1 has no insulin produced, type 1.5 has less than optimal insulin produced (long honeymoon period until later onset of no insulin production) type 2 is over insulin production with insulin resistance. Although insulin resistance can be a factor in 1 & 1.5 as well. So unless he’s suggesting 1.5 less than optimal insulin production with insulin resistance, I don’t see how you can be 1&2.

    I guess so long as you find a medication/insulin regime that works for you and your diabetes that’s the important thing. Does it matter if your type 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 26, 60, or 1001?
     
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  6. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    thank you @Jim Lahey .

    an informative post as usual, and t&c's noted.

    so much to learn.
    every days a school day.

    cheers
     
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  7. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    I just hate agreeing with @Jim Lahey lol, but he's right. Several things can occur.

    You can be a type 1 that becomes insulin resistant, which would add on a type 2 diagnosis. You could also have been a misdiagnosed type 1/LADA in the first place, that happens way too often. They labeled you a type 2 at the beginning and don't want to say they were wrong, that you were really a type 1/LADA.

    You could be a type 2 that had the gene to become a type 1 that has now started to develop.

    Some type 2's take insulin because they need extra because they are so insulin resistant. Also type 2's at some point can need to take insulin because they have been insulin resistant usually for a while. But a type 2 even at this point is producing some amount of insulin. They could just be labeling you a type 1 because of the insulin need, but not really a type 1? You'd be surprised at the misinformation still in the medical community.

    What you need is an antibody test and a c peptide test to know if you are a type 1.
     
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  8. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Sorry you have heard what must be such confusing news @ickihun . Have they suggested that they test your insulin levels or is that how they deduced the new diagnosis?
     
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  9. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    Who made this diagnosis @ickihun ? Consultant, gp or biatric people? What basis have they used?
     
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  10. Emily95

    Emily95 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Type 1 with insulin resistant isn’t called having ‘type 1 and type 2’. It’s called having type 1 diabetes and insulin resistance.
     
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  11. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    Oh dear. So sorry to hear this @ickihun. Hugs.
     
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  12. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    I have heard the term”double diabetes” but that appears to be in a type 1 who then develops insulin resistance. @ickihun appears to have been type 2 first.
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/double-diabetes.html
     
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  13. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Is there anything to say a type 2 cannot develop type 1? Surely an autoimmune reaction can occur at any point no matter what has preceded it?

    What about when a type 2’s pancreas is exhausted and stops producing? Could this result in a kind of layman’s type 1 diagnosis? Ie lack of insulin as opposed to a true autoimmune type 1?
     
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    #13 HSSS, Sep 20, 2019 at 9:02 PM
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2019
  14. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    None of this is helped by the fact that - preposterously - insulin testing, or even the need to do it, is very much misunderstood with regards to type 2. Thus leading to many assumptions and misdiagnoses. It's little wonder that confusion is sometimes rampant. Certainly among GPs and DNs anyway. At my last annual review I explained that I had funded my own insulin and inflammation tests. The DN's eyes glazed over. She did not have the foggiest idea what I was talking about. Literally no clue.
     
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  15. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Not to my knowledge.
     
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  16. Kim Possible

    Kim Possible Type 1 · Expert

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    @ickihun you are certainly not having an easy time of it but I admire your perseverance and wait loss.
    To me, whether you have type 1 diabetes, type 2, both or something else, the important thing to focus on is getting the right treatment.
    If, 20 years ago, I was told I would be injecting insulin for the rest of my life, I would have been worried and shocked. After 15 years of doing it, injecting is just part of who I am. Especially if you consider the alternative.
     
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  17. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I've been injecting for 13yrs with just an approx. year off trying other meds without great success. So planning my second pregnancy was an insulin treated period too. After a successful birth I struggled without insulin again. After what I deemed an emotional 'burn out' which was due to unsuccessful control.... so I gave up. My quick referral to the Endo refreshed my fight, mainly for my young children's sake. I was placed back on insulin immediately. Of which I felt very confident to manage. After all, I had for 2 healthy babies. I still feel confident but have nagging thoughts that I don't need it. After all type2s shouldn't need insulin right? Of course I know many do.
    I do.
    Until I've lost more weight from my 3mth old Roux-en-y operation and thereafter. I won't believe I cannot reverse mine.
    Well, I think. Or was thinking.
    I will just continue improving my health and what will be... will be. Having my long awaited x-ray on my back/pelvis on Monday. So another health saga, probables.
    I could write a book. Ha ha
    Thanks for your wise advice @helensaramay. I have a new diabetic consultant, not by choice so I'll be interested in his take in 5mths time. There has been no mention of my thyroid TSH levels but I will chase it up when I see my new DN too.
     
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  18. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    My old consultant reassured me I was type2 due to my severe insulin resistance. However my GP read matters on my data on screen and told me I'm type1 and type2. I hadn't gone to discuss my diabetes but my back/pelvis and walking deteriation even after 4st loss in 3mths.
    I'm guessing arthritis as my neck is now affecting my right arm, however we hv all been guessing... for years. I was hoping obesity related only too. Its stopping me fighting off more fat and toning up parts that rely on my back supporting me.
     
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  19. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I think notes from my operation hv been received and Dr has followed them on to try and get my back/pelvis sorted out. So he's highlighted for another/any GP or Specialist if I don't see him with my x-ray results.
    I'm back with palpatations but no so much as a panic attack but just happy that maybe my back is going to be fixed or improved. My older son was my exercise companion so he's struggled for a new exercise companion until recently.
    Calling bariatric Unit today for ok to go back to swimming pool for more than gentle stretches.
    I think x-ray will show heredity arthritis which needs my exercise that I find not so harsh on joints, even more so.
     
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  20. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Ickihun, with all your weight loss, if I were having palpitations, I'd want my thyroid function checked, bearing in mind you are taking Levothyroxine. Dosing for Levothyroxine is not, generally weight driven, but as our thyroid function is heavily involved in our metabolic systems, it seems plausible the improvements in your overall health could be impacting how much T4 you are needing. Palpitations can be a sign of being over-medicated - as we all of a million and one other things.
     
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