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Type 1 Binge eating disorder

Discussion in 'Eating disorders and diabetes' started by HayleyBumble, Oct 9, 2017.

  1. Mariedoc

    Mariedoc · Member

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    Me too help x
     
  2. SueJB

    SueJB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You're not alone ever with everyone being here for you. Good luck and a warm hug
     
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  3. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Moderator
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    ladies, you might find this useful. This is the Diabetes With Eating Disorders charity: http://dwed.org.uk/
     
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  4. Diabetic46years

    Diabetic46years Type 1 · Member

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    Boy, reading all these posts makes me realise how not alone I am. Because alone is how we feel. Binge eating and over eating is more often than not driven by far too low glucose levels. So, the answer is about managing insulin, diet and excercise to avoid the lows and the highs. It is really really difficult and people that don't actually live with Diabetes really realy don't know what is it like and how hard it is. I am Type 1 and have struggled for years with weight and eating, and it is only now that I realise that the insulin and the low glucose drives appetite in a way no one can understand. From being on this Forum, I am learning that there are many people grappling and battling, and it is so important to know that you are not alone in this daily battle.
     
  5. KateMeg

    KateMeg Type 1 · Member

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    One thing that really helps me with this is trying to limit how much novorapid i'm taking. For me the more sugar I eat the more I want! When my bloods are over the 12/13 mark all i can think about is sugar. Trying to keep yourself full with fats and protein (try not to think calories!) will help to prevent you from wanting to binge, and hopefully help to break the cycle.
     
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  6. Alison54321

    Alison54321 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    This is difficult. Having diabetes is restrictive, and it's hard to stick to the rules for a long period, so at some level the desire to binge for a few weeks, is probably quite normal in a way, who wouldn't do that, if their diet was so restricted?

    However, it's not good. I remember having periods when I didn't think about what I was eating at all, and I would binge on things. Now I'm very good, and just don't do it at all, but it was a very long journey to get here. I don't remember quite how I got did, there were a lot of mistakes made on the way.

    We all have an inner critic that say unhelpful things to us, that are often the cause of behaviour that isn't good for us. Unfortunately, we all have a different inner critic, so there is no simple basic rules on how to overcome it.

    It's just trying to understand yourself, without being critical, but with the intention of changing behaviour that is unhelpful to you. One of the roles a good counsellor can play is being the voice of a "reasonable adult" that helps to overcome the critical voice.

    I think the advice above about accepting your weight, and just allowing you to be you is good advice, that's very much the reasonable adult voice speaking there. That is who you have to nuture in yourself. Hopefully, you can start to find the reasonable adult.
     
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  7. Diabetic46years

    Diabetic46years Type 1 · Member

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    It is a very difficult thing to manage, and people don't appreciate what goes into to keeping blood sugar stable between 4-6/7mm/l. My relationship with food has been made very difficult because of feeling the low blood sugars, then injecting to bring the glucose down, and gaining weight and then feeling down which drives the comfort eating. So you are not alone, but it feels like a lonely journey. I am trying to focus on nutrition and giving my body good things that can help it be well and healthy. I am also trying to lose the breads as well as alcohol. Alison has wise words. But it boils down to have stable blood sugars so that the other issues can be dealt with. It's hard, but you are not alone. Believe me.
     
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  8. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Moderator
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  9. EasyHeart

    EasyHeart · Newbie

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    Hi, sounds like battle fatigue. It will have taken a while to have got this bad for you so it's important to allow yourself to take as much time as you need to restore yourself. Try to find 3 acts of self kindness you can do each day - not food related - simple low demand activies that allow you to create space to pause and breathe. This helps reduce overwhelm. When you have a bit of space you can remember what helped you get well in the past and make a conscious decision to reintroduce one small thing back into your daily life. Start with something you know you will succeed at and be kind to yourself- self compassion creates lots of possibilities to explore change. Good luck.
     
  10. Contralto

    Contralto Type 2 · Expert

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    This is not just a type 1 thing. In a way, it's a diabetic fatigue kind of thing because once in a while, it's great to pretend to not have to choose, not have to monitor, not have to control everything, it's just that for us, the consequences are so much worse.

    It is nice to be around other Diabetics once in a while and express all the range of normal emotions
     
  11. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Burn out.

    Like any condition which needs managing 'burn out' can occur.

    Like I've said for a long time once another condition to manage is mixed with diabetes it makes management so much harder..... but not impossible.

    For type1s it can make a huge difference as hypos/hypers can be in the dangerous zones, very quickly too.
    Its harder for type1s when another additional pressure takes your mind away from daily (hour by hour) management.

    Type1s with ED must be very scary but thankful good experience on here.
    The post grabbed my attention so I felt rude not to read.

    Type2s management is far different as not as urgent to iron out the sugary spikes. Mainly liver induced, for me. Type1s spikes can kill but are due to no insulin or very little.
    Sooo different.
     
    #31 ickihun, Jul 26, 2018 at 6:52 AM
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2018
  12. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Moderator
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    This is way off topic, but I would robustly challenge your assertion that the majority of T2 blood sugar spikes are due to liver activity. My view is that some are due to liver dumping, but the vast majority are due to eating and drinking.

    However, as that point is off-topic to this important matter of binge eating, I won't comment further.
     
  13. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Sorry I'll edit adding..... 'for me'. Like you say I agree that sentence not relevant to some type1s. Thanks for correction. :)
     
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