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Type 2 and chronic fatigue syndrome

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Angelofthemarches, Feb 27, 2018.

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  1. Angelofthemarches

    Angelofthemarches Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, prescribed by private doctor, 3mg. Works great with phosphatidylserine and Ashwagandha (great names!) to help me sleep. I had chronic exhaustion, was unable to function.
     
  2. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome as referred to in the title of this thread, is a recognised medical condition.

    https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/chronic-fatigue-syndrome-cfs/ sometimes also referred to as ME although the jury is out on whether these are the same conditions.

    It is not insomnia, sleep apnea or similar, although they can also be present.
     
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    #22 lucylocket61, Feb 28, 2018 at 2:56 PM
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2018
  3. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am finding that a routine is helpful. Not a rigid routine, but a routine nevertheless. I t helps me in tow ways:

    1) I dont have to constantly think about what I am doing or going to do next
    2) I build in rest periods, and interchangeable periods but eat and drink at approx the same times each day, with a tea break morning and evening, even if i havent done anything. It seems to keep my blood sugars more even, my sleep (or resting_ patterns more regular, and breaks up the monotony of a bad day.

    OH, and I have several different crafting projects available, depending on how the day is going as to which one I do. Some are easier than others.

    I also try to play work ahead as much as possible, and break it down into small tasks so I dont get caught out with an emergency order avalanche.

    Mind you, I have been dealing with this for nearly 25 years. From the days of dismissive sneering doctors and yuppie flu comments. Mine started after glandular fever, but apparently having had peritonitis and losing some of my small intestine in my early 20's may also have affected my immune system.

    I take B12, on my doctors advice, he recommends it for anyone with bowel/absorption issues.
     
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  4. Angelofthemarches

    Angelofthemarches Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thankyou, this is really helpful. I am trying to get it diagnosed at the minute - had a really disparaging meeting with an endocrinologist yesterday. It's very frustrating.
     
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  5. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I took me 12 years, and a psychiatrist to get a diagnosis. I have anxiety and depression, but my psychiatrist knew there was more going on. You will be in my thoughts.
     
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  6. Angelofthemarches

    Angelofthemarches Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It has taken 3 years so far and much self doubt (and exhaustion) on my part.
    Sending you a friendly hug!
     
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  7. lindijanice

    lindijanice Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I regularly take melatonin 5mg if I am in one of my insomnia phases - have Fibro - and it knocks me out for a few hours. Not intended for long term use though....and I am not on other meds as you describe. But I do take Flexeril 10mg nightly which is a muscle relaxant and does give me some restorative sleep.....One thing I find when I do take Melatonin, I dream crazy in the early morning hours!! Go figure:) Blessings/L
     
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  8. Angelofthemarches

    Angelofthemarches Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, i get that too with melatonin!!
     
  9. AFM

    AFM Type 2 · Member

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    Yes I am in the same boat, just gone from tablets to insulin, but have had insomnia for years, but if I do get to sleep I wake up so tied, I am supposed to be between 7 and 11, but are bouncing up to 15 at times, having diabetes is like trying to handle jelly and getting a handle and control of it on it, but in reality you cannot
     
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  10. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sleep disruption/deprivation is one of the major trigger for T2D. I suspect my T2D was largely triggered by the months of night feeding duty when my boy arrived. :) The cost of late parenthood. We are probably more resilient when we are youger.

    Nowadays I try to get my morning sun and eat less in the evening, no tea or coffee in the afternoon Little things that helps me get better more restful sleep...
     
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  11. Foxholesoak

    Foxholesoak Type 2 · Member

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    Hi, I have sleep issues and fatigue too. My gp will give me zopiclone if I need it but will
    Only take for two days at time as after that doesn’t work for me. Also it’s addictive, but it helps when get to stage I could just sit on floor and go to sleep. I was sent to sleep clinic and had sleep tests, have an upper respitory issue and some apnea, have a sleep cpap machine which helps me think clearer, so that’s worth investigating maybe. I just put fatigue down to my age 54 and menopause and being type two. Hope you get help you need x
     
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  12. Elmsj

    Elmsj Prediabetes · Newbie

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    Yes, I was prescribed Melatonin by the consultant I see for my POTS ( co-morbidity with CFS) it helps enormously
     
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  13. Suzie Quartly

    Suzie Quartly · Active Member

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    Are you 100% that it is CFS? I ask because my DN said this was the reason I was so tired, and over a year of moaning at her I bypassed her and went to the GP who said, lets do a blood test. The results were that despite taking supplements my Vit D was off the end of the scale and my B12 heading that way. I still get very tired from time to time, I always did, diabetes or not, Now this might sound odd but the way I can overcome this is by swimming 3 times a week. It takes tremendous mind power when you are knackered to go out and exercise, but the result is that I sleep really really well at night and am able to wake up refreshed and ready to take on the next day. Once I am in the pattern of it its fine, I am not at the moment and know I need a kick in the butt to get out there again.
     
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  14. knoxy55

    knoxy55 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I have T2 diabetes controlled by meds and diet. I have just been diagnosed with Polymyalgia which is inflammation in the muscles of the body. My arms and right hip are mainly affected, my Dr has it classed as a minor complaint, which I was surprised at because of the amount of pain I am in. When I cannot stand the pain any more I take Ibuprofen long lasting which just takes the edge of the pain and I use a rub as well. The treatment for this condition is steroids, which we know doesn't mix well with diabetes and can cause weight gain, which I do not want having shed 2 stones and still going. I would be starting on a medium dose and then reduced over time until I was on a maintenance dose. A blood test is used for diagnosis so ask your Dr to do one. What are the thoughts of the community think about steroids and diabetes. Sorry for rant.
     
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  15. Suzie Quartly

    Suzie Quartly · Active Member

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    I also have spurious aches and pains, but also have arthritis. I was lucky enough to spend a fair amount of time in Asia until 2 yrs ago. In that climate I rarely had pain flare ups. However, in a country where asprin and ibuprofen are prescription drugs I started taking the over the counter drug of choice there - Ponstan (mefememic acid). Brilliant stuff. I still get it brought over for me, and havent spoken to the doc about it, as I dont need it often, but its a prescription drug in UK.
     
  16. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Expert

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    Has any one seen the film by Jennifer Brea a sufferer of CFS it's called Unrest and it opened my eyes to just how much suffering and heartbreak CFS can cause.



    It would seem many people with CFS have severely messed up immune systems and or have poorly functioning mitochondria causing an inability to properly carry out Aerobic exercise and are limited to Anaerobic exercise with can only be maintained for relatively short periods.
     
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  17. LizzieNI

    LizzieNI Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was told by Dr who ran Chronic fatigue clinic in Belfast (now retired) that I couldn't be diagnosed with CFS as I had diabetes (T1). He refused to do the tests and when he retired the clinic was discontinued. My GP agrees I do have CFS but I never got the official test. Interested in see how you get on re results.
     
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  18. LizzieNI

    LizzieNI Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Jennifer Brea (Unrest) has Pots too. Do you think it's worth investigating for CFS without Pots?
     
  19. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am glad you have not got CFS. I have felt a bit brighter since having my vitamin D and B12 levels normalized. But still, if I try to exercise I am paying for it for 48 hours afterwards. For those of us with CFS/ME exercise depletes, not energizes us.

    I tried the programme of graded exercise to build up muscle and stamina, and ended up in a very bad state for 8 months afterwards.

    http://www.meassociation.org.uk/201...down-on-exercise-treatment-25-september-2017/
     
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  20. Jac25

    Jac25 Type 2 · Member

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    I have CFS/M.E. as well. In fact, the diabetes was picked up when they did the barrage of tests to exclude everything else - there is no test for CFS, it's diagnosed by eliminating everything else it could be. I was also severely vitamin D deficient, but the huge supplements they gave me made no difference to the CFS. And if you really have got CFS/ M.E. you can't exercise through it. One of the key diagnostics is PEM - post exertional malaise. Any activity causes severe muscular pain, and a crash in energy levels, usually the next day. For some people graded exercise helps, but that has to start with tiny amounts and build up incredibly gradually. Even that is controversial because it's made a number of patients worse, even rendered them bedbound.

    I struggle with LCHF and CFS/ME. I often don't have the energy to cook, and can only shop once a week. I try to make a stew, chicken or lamb with lots of vegetables and very little potato, once a week. That feeds me for 4 days, but even with a chopping machine it exhausts me. I made one yesterday, couldn't get out of bed this morning. Just chopping a few veggies causes acute pain across my shoulders and I can't stand for more than a few minutes. The rest of the week I eat omelette, fish, or tinned soup if too tired to cook. I eat porridge sometimes - less than 20 grams doesn't spike my sugars, but that's individual. I snack on cheese and nuts - too much cheese, and that has put my cholesterol up. Also eat dark chocolate, and I know too much of that. It's the one thing I haven't managed to give up.

    I try to plan ahead so that energy goes into the important things like getting food and cooking it. But if I have a shower, I can't cook the same day. If I go to the supermarket I ride their in store scooters. But with CFS/ME, mental energy drains the battery as much as physical, so just driving around, avoiding all the people who ignore anybody not on two legs, uses up the energy for that day.

    Since Christmas I have had a bad flare up of the CFS/ME, and a corresponding weight gain. Partly because the little exercise I was doing just walking round the house, I can't do. Partly because I struggle to cook and eat the right things. These two illnesses are hell together. And if you think the NHS is useless with diabetes, you should see what they're like with CFS/ME. Despite the WHO classifying it as a neurological disease, the NHS is still trying to use CBT for it. Having suffered from depression for over 30 years, and fought my way back from the brink over and over, held down a demanding full time job, and cared for elderly parents, I can categorically tell you there is nothing psychological about this illness, and you cannot think your way out of it. I know, I tried. And made myself so ill that I lost my job. The only thing that works for me is pacing and rest. Do a little....do nothing...do a little more.

    Don't know if any of that helps, but hope so. Wishing you all the best dealing with these two illnesses.
     
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