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Type 2 and statins

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by aard, Jul 19, 2020.

  1. aard

    aard · Well-Known Member

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    So my Dr is constantly trying to push statins on me due combination of high bad cholestal/ high blood pressure and diabetes.

    He ssts I have 20% chance of dying in 19 yrs although I like to point out I have 80% chance of not dying.

    Everything I’ve read about statins makes me want to stay well clear of them and Tbh my h1bc of 48 and bp of 120/90 doesn't seem that high.

    Not looking for advice on taking as I wont, but am curious about other peoples thoughts/experiences on taking statins due to diabetes/high blood pressure?
     
    #1 aard, Jul 19, 2020 at 10:39 PM
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2020
  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Statins treat neither diabetes nor high blood pressure.. maybe time for a proper doctor yours sound well past the sell by date?
     
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  3. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    If you are sick of having your Dr push them on you, then put your foot down and make it clear you will not take them. It's your decision, not your doctors. I also find that sometimes when you reject a doctors advice, they can resort to fear tactics to try and get their way. Good luck putting and end to the pushing.
     
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  4. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Expert

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    Kind of nonsensical, as nothing you mention relates to statins (which is a cholesterol drug) in any way, shape or form. Blood pressure's pretty much fine, your HbA1c certainly isn't half-bad either, you're in the prediabetic range now. You are entitled to your "No, thanks".
     
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  5. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What dosage of statin was being pushed. What is your lipid profile like. I've never heard of statins for hypertension before. Just curious. BP isn't high anyway. Diastolic is getting into the worry zone for some GPs but systolic is perfect. I admit that my GP is also very watchful of BP with his diabetic patients as well but mine is OK so no worries on that one. He did talk me into a statin after many months of vacillating and thoroughly explained his reasons. He's been a fantastic Dr for half my life and my dose is the lowest he could go at 2.5mg. I have zero side effects. With my fat heavy diet my cholesterol went from 6.5 to 3.9 but I'd have to go and look up the exact profile. I'm not unhappy with the decision.
     
  6. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Your GP needs re-training or retiring. As others have said your BP is just fine and so is your diabetes, Statins are not a diabetes drug and should only be offered if your various LDL/HDL/Trig ratios are bad and then you should be started on a minimum dose to see how it goes.
     
  7. Jaysull

    Jaysull Type 2 · Newbie

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    Statins have no impact on diabetes or BP, which in your case are both OK. Ask your Dr. about your cholesterol levels and if these are not in the normal category then you might well be advised to take statins, but of course it’s your choice. I’ve taken Atorvastatin for the last 20 years ( due to familial hypercholestereamia) and, having had my 73rd birthday a while ago, think it’s been a good bet!
     
  8. Daphne917

    Daphne917 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately Statins do have an impact on diabetes albeit an adverse one. My hba1c increased from 48 to 54 after I started taking them - within 6 months of coming off them it had reduced to almost normal levels.
     
  9. aard

    aard · Well-Known Member

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    oops my mistake I missed off the high cholestal, it was the combination of high choles plus high bp/diabetes for statin. Post corrected.

    My trigs ard bad, as is my hdl/ldl ratio.

    and the h1abc was wrong, what a doofus!
     
    #9 aard, Jul 20, 2020 at 7:55 PM
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2020
  10. aard

    aard · Well-Known Member

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    This one of the reasons I worry about taking statins but my Doctor dismisses statins making blood sugars worse.
     
  11. aard

    aard · Well-Known Member

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    The 120/90 is only with drugs and exercise othewise its 130/100. It was a long night, hence the many mistakes in my post
     
  12. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    what are your cholesterol figures please?
     
  13. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This was my experience too. I went from 36 to 41. I lowered my carb intake further and have settled to around an average of 38. I'm only on 2.5mg but the reduction in cholesterol levels in my case seems worthwhile. All a juggling act. I'd rather not take them but so far the benefits outweigh the downside.
     
  14. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    They certainly increased mine but it is quite manageable with vigilance.
     
    #14 Crocodile, Jul 20, 2020 at 10:38 PM
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2020
  15. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse · Well-Known Member

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    This is the calculator used to estimate risk of coronary heart disease or stroke in people who have had neither:- https://qrisk.org/three/

    It takes into account current blood pressure and whether someone is on treatment for high blood pressure. It also takes into account whether or not someone has diabetes, but not how well controlled that diabetes is.
     
  16. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    They don't take control into account. Apparently it makes little difference. Diabetics are prone to Atherogenic Dyslipidemia. I'll try and find the reference later when I get a spare nanosecond.
     
  17. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It's 10 years old now and I have seen more up to date ones but the gist is the same. Unfortunately, type 2 has a higher risk of coronary disease for as yet not fully explained reasons but statistically significant.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2941780/
     
  18. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The following paper discusses cardiovascular events and glycemic control in a bit more detail.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3480668/

    Their findings were that tight control was fundamental to microvascular health. Unfortunately, macrovascular health wasn't significantly altered meaning that for diabetics good glycemic control alone is insufficient to lower the risk of cardiovascular events. There doesn't appear to be any rock solid reasons given but the statistics are compelling enough to say that diabetics have a higher risk even with good glycemic control.
     
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  19. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse · Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting, thanks.

    Not particularly related to that but also interesting is this discussion of risk prediction tools such as QRisk:- https://www.prescriber.co.uk/article/cardiovascular-risk-prediction-for-primary-prevention/
     
  20. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    They don't say how glycemic control was achieved for the Type 2 diabetics.
    What you say is only true if you make the assumption that good glycemic control can only be achieved by the medications used on the subjects of the studies. I would be extremely surprised if any of the studies included anybody with good control achieved either by surgery or by diet.

    The paper isn't that new, so its probably safe to assume that good glycemic control means use of Insulin rather than SGLT2s.
    Isn't hyperinsuinemia (as well as Hyperglycemia) known for damaging the endolthelium?
    Hence Insulin users may well be at higher risk of cardiovascular events than non-users which may well cancel out the beneficial effect of good glycemic control.
     
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