1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Type 2- I know I'm young.

Discussion in 'Young People/Adults' started by GeePei, Apr 3, 2018.

  1. GeePei

    GeePei Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    43
    So let's cut to the chase, I'm 19 and I was diagnosed as pre-diabetic back when I was 15 and then it wasn't long until I was diagnosed as type 2 diabetic. I've been taking medication to help with it ever since my diagnosis back when I was 15. I've taken metformin, Metformin prolonged release, Dapagliflozin, Sitigliptin and now I'm taking Victoza. Although I could never tolerate any of the Metformins, I was placed on Dapagliflozin whilst taking it to see if it would help lower my BGL. But, whilst taking it, my doctors took me off Metformin and put me on sitigliptin. In the transition from taking Metformin to Sitigliptin, my GP accidently took Dapagliflozin off as one of my repeat prescriptions however because I just presumed that I couldn't take it with the new drug, I didn't question it. Never the less, when I went back to see my endocrinologist he asked me how Dapagliflozin was going. It was at this point I discovered I still could take it and should have been taken it but due to my GPs negligence, I hadn't been taken it and now my levels were elevating even further. I tried Sitigliptin for a while but due to the elevation, we decided it wasn't working for me so now I inject myself with liraglutide (Victoza). Its only after injecting myself with this, that I realise that I should have just sucked it up and dealt with the side effects of Metformin (I never thought I'd say that- I felt so bad whilst taking it but I feel worse now). The side effects I get now are so bad I can't be away from the house for more than an hour. It a compleatly destroying what little of a social life I had.

    Now, I know I'm quite young to have type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, I didn't have a great childhood and this resulted to comfort eating alot and I've also got a hormone imbalance problem which has resulted in me gaining a considerable amount of weight. Type 2 diabetes also runs in my family so although there's not as much of a genetic predisposition as there is with type 1, there is some.

    I'm feeling so alone with this battle right now. Being young isn't helping either as there's not many people my age injecting themselves with such a drug as I am. Has anybody else had this problem? I'm feeling like I can't go out to see friends (etc.) because I might need to take the injection with me.

    Any advice or support is greatly welcomed.

    Thank you.
     
    • Hug Hug x 7
    • Like Like x 1
    #1 GeePei, Apr 3, 2018 at 3:45 AM
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2018
  2. Geordie_P

    Geordie_P Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    377
    Likes Received:
    358
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Well you are young, so it's tough to have type 2, but on the plus side, you're young!
    Type 2 is quite good in terms of being manageable, so hopefully you can get your levels under control and then I don't see why you shouldn't be able to enjoy a full life. You've got it all ahead of you, and you've got us all behind you, so I reckon you'll be able to get through the tougher times.
    Keep us posted with how you're doing!
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Winner Winner x 1
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  3. Ragmar

    Ragmar Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    206
    Trophy Points:
    83
    First off! They are your friends and should be supportive of you taking your shots and checking your sugars. Don't be afraid to go out and live your life, you are young.

    And if type two runs in your family, reach out to those members and learn from them, but keep in mind that our bodies are different from each other's and what may effect them might not effect you.

    Start a food journal, you are going to have to change how you eat.

    For exercise, I would recommend talking to your doctor or endo about working out because I'm not sure how it'll effect your medicine and etc.

    Lastly I wanna tell you to go and read a few threads on the success forum and think about the day you'll be able to post a thread in their talking about how you changed your life for the better.

    And like the user above me said, the plus side is your young. Establish a support circle with friends and family, work on your diet and incorporate some form of exercise even if it's walking around the block.

    Wishing you the best in your management and care
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  4. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,655
    Likes Received:
    2,237
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Not anywhere near as young as you, but my hormones have never been right either, and I get the comfort-food thing all too well... I was rather big. Still not exactly what you'd call slim, but my HbA1c is beautiful at 38. Anyway, that's a whole lot of meds to be on already! I don't know if you've tried a low carb/high fat diet, but there's still room there for comfort-food (low carb, yeah, but high fat makes for yummy possibilities!). I've lost 20 kilo's (40 pounds) and could quit the meds because of it, so maybe that's an idea? As for injecting around friends; they're friends. Explain, get their support, and get out there. Enjoy life a little! ;) @daisy1 will have some basic info for you too which might help. Good luck!
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  5. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    26,459
    Likes Received:
    4,871
    Trophy Points:
    248
    @GeePei

    Hello GeePei and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    13,198
    Likes Received:
    18,260
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi @GeePei.

    I was young too and I'm now 47yrs old. I wasn't diagnosed at 6yrs old even thou i had the symptoms. Overeating sugary foods for energy and strength. I was very very strong but extremely overweight. I wasn't aware I was diabetic. I was never tested/diagnosed til 2002.
    Your meds are helping you fend off blindness and black toes/feet which lead to amputation.

    I need you to have a look in successes and testimonials. They aren't fake but 100% true. You have done the best thing for your diabetes by joining here.
    In my experience food/diet is the biggest influence on type2 management. With the right foods you can influence lower blood results. On your meter and by drs hba1c blood test.
    However with your meds and better food choices you may start having hypos or verging towards hypo numbers on your meter. If so your diabetic nurse needs to help you reduce your meds. Maybe injections may be able to be stopped.
    ONLY UNDER DN OR GP GUIDANCE.
    The food or diet I'm referring to is the low carb one. It's a fantastic type2 tool to managing high bgs.
    Have a look in that section of the forum for huge support.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    #6 ickihun, Apr 3, 2018 at 10:17 AM
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2018
  7. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,667
    Likes Received:
    1,127
    Trophy Points:
    198
    There is lots of hope here and the sooner you improve your eating habits the quicker you will feel better. As you already know you are on a lot of meds which don't always agree with you and seem to be barely managing your problem.
    Are you getting any help with diet btw? This is the thing that will have most impact on your condition and is also the most within your control. You could set a fantastic example to your family here too.
    BTW type 2 is much more inheritable than type 1 diabetes!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. ziawattoo54

    ziawattoo54 Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Hi there,
    I'm 21 and I've type 2 diabetes since I was 3. I've been injecting since then!! But, I don't feel this affecting my social life. It's been 18 years now, I've drawn a balance line gradually. Hopefully, you'll also adjust with it, it's nothing different from the rest of people around you. You just have to take a little care.
    Wish you best of luck with that.
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 2
  9. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,395
    Likes Received:
    2,897
    Trophy Points:
    198
    60% of people diagnosed with type 1 have no family history of it. Type 2 is much more heritable.

    To bad diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at 15 suggests you must have been a very overweight 15 year old. Have you lost weight since your diagnosis? What is your BMI? What is your diet like? You say you comfort eat, but obviously you can recognise yourself comfort eating so you can take steps to avoid it: when I feel like this instead of eating, and so I don't feel like I have to eat I need to, I dunno knit 10 lines of a scarf and go for a walk round the block, or play a computer game etc etc. Have you had any assistance from a dietician with managing your blood sugar and weight loss? What do your blood sugars look like on a daily basis? What's your hba1c?
     
    • Useful Useful x 1
  10. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

    Messages:
    6,846
    Likes Received:
    4,373
    Trophy Points:
    198
    The side effects are truly awful - I had such a bad time during the five weeks I took Metformin and a statin that I was losing the will to live.
    Luckily I have been a long time low carber, right from my early 20s, and so I happily returned to how I was eating to maintain my weight and the diabetes has just gone away - I had normal results after 6 months.
    As you are so much younger, and presumably so much more able to be active than I am at almost 67 years old, could you try to reduce your need for medication by eating a low carb diet?
    It is true that there can be temptations but I have only to think of the state I was in just before Christmas 2016 for a diet of frogspawn and garlic to be preferable to having to go back onto Metformin. When I think of all the things I can eat and enjoy, I really do think that having the diagnosis did me a favour - I was on a so called cholesterol reducing diet for almost two years, put on masses of weight and it did very little for my cholesterol levels - and it made the various ratios of the component parts very bad indeed. They have improved a lot now despite all the fats I eat.
     
  11. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    10,965
    Likes Received:
    33,613
    Trophy Points:
    298
    • Like Like x 2
  12. GeePei

    GeePei Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I wasn't diagnosed at 15 with diabetes, I was only pre-diabetic then. Unfortunately I had a very traumatic childhood which lead to eventual intervention with social services so a very rocky life has lead to bad mental health amongst other problems. I have always been very overweight, even when I was very young so it has been a problem for the majority of my life and I am under regular care from doctors and nurses because of it. I eat a very healthy diet and have been for many years now but I can't seem to loose weight. My mother is very supportive and we eat well together. My grandad is a type 2 diabetic and has been for many years. My family adjusted to cater for his needs and therefore it is a way of life for us. I would like to note that his BMI has never been high so this is not the cause for his diabetes. I would also like to note that it has taken years of therapy to understand that I comfort eat and luckily, I have been able to reduce this considerably with the help of my psychartrist. When I do comfort eat (maybe once every 2 months) I don't realise I've done it and how bad it is until ive finished. My psychartrist and other mental health teams have supported me to find ways on how to stop comforting eating however they're not cures so it can still happen. I also regularly see a diabetic nurse, endocrinologist and dietician as well.
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  13. GeePei

    GeePei Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    43
    • Like Like x 1
  14. GeePei

    GeePei Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Thank you for sharing your experiences and suggestions with me! A few years back my mother and I thankfully found a diet called the "Terri-anne 123 diet" and it honestly changed our lives. It's a very low carb, high protein diet and it has helped alot. We have been eating like this for around 3 years now but before that, we used to do slimming world together. My mum has been able to stick to it religiously but I have had a few ups and downs with it (I think, maybe to do with my age and seeing friends etc.). I quickly realised that carbs seemed to make my stomach worse so doing a low carb diet was the best thing. It was hard though because my family are Italian and pasta was always a big thing in our lives. It was the only thing I was sad to see go.
     
  15. GeePei

    GeePei Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Injecting is a very new thing for me but I'm sure I'll learn how to cope with it over time. My grandad has always been an injector so I wasn't scared of having to inject and I actually find it easier to remember than taking my tablets. Thank you for your comment and support!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. GeePei

    GeePei Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I'm actually only on one type of medication, thankfully. I just inject myself with 1.2mg of Liraglutide a day. My eating habits have greatly improved from a few years ago, especially since my mother and I discovered a diet called the "Terri-Anne 123 diet". It's a low carb, high protein diet and it's been amazing. I've struggled a little with it due to not being able to eat nuts and things but apart from that, it's a good diet. I regularly see my dietician who gives me support on my diet and my mum is very supportive of the dieting.
     
  17. GeePei

    GeePei Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Thank you so much for your lovely comment! It was nice to read something so encouraging instead of being bashed for things. I'm looking forward to a better future and will get this all under control! Many thanks to you again.
     
  18. GeePei

    GeePei Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Thank you for your supportive comment! I have drastically changed my diet since my initial diagnosis. Low carb, high protein diet. My mother is supportive of the dieting process for she too had a problem with weight and therefore were trying to do it together.

    Unfortunately, my mental health isn't fantastic so exercise is something I really struggle with when I can barely get out of bed due to feeling so down. I have alot younger siblings so they definitely keep me on my toes and I try and walk whenever I can too! I do little but often, ya know?

    I'm going to take your advice and establish a support circle as I think this will be very effective for me.

    Many thanks!
     
  19. GeePei

    GeePei Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Thank you for the information! I am going to sit down and make sure I do all my research. My family and I have already adopted a low carb, high protein diet and that seems to be better. We tried slimming world however found that it never worked for us. Hopefully with a little bit if perseverance, I can get everything back in control.
     
  20. ziawattoo54

    ziawattoo54 Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Oh sorry, there is typo in my comment above, I've type 1 diabetes not type 2.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook