1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Uncontrolled Type 2 and hyper's happening....

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by whyme_again, Jul 25, 2019.

  1. whyme_again

    whyme_again Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    41
    I am Type 2 and was started on Metaformin (the Endo wanted to start me on this in 2010 but with my other medical conditions decided against it as it would worsen my symptoms so we have been tying to control my blood sugars via diet - at that time, I had been suffering from reactive hypo's for years) but because of my adverse reactions so severe, affecting my bowels so badly, that the GP made a swift change of medication. It has helped a little but my blood sugar levels are still uncontrolled and on the high side, so now I am currently on two medications to control my blood sugar levels.

    I'm not sure what to do as don't know if they are actually doing the job because I am continually geting symptoms for high blood sugars, despite taking the medication exactly as told. One is Aglipton and the other is Glizergen (I may be misspelling them, sorry). I am also trying to follow the advice from the diabetic nurse on eating carbs (difficult with diet restrictions for other medical conditions). She requested that the GP refer me to the dietation but I am already waiting for my referal from last year to be sorted (they stopped the clinc so had to be referred to some other clinic with a very LONG waiting list!).

    Last week I was sent into A & E due to stomach pains and the GP requested further tests and an ultrasound of the abdomen as they thought might be gallbladder issues. Blood tests revealed that I was having a hype (didn't tell me what they were but I already knew that they were high as my 3 month tests results have shot up from 48 last year to 60 in January, 73 in May and because my vision was so severly affected, was drinking like a fish, so tired all the time plus the usual thrush symtoms, the nurse decided to add in the 3 month test - think she was glad in a way as provided vital info on the increase, which is now 77 at start of this month). I put it down to the steriods but as I am now on a maintenance dose of 5mg a day, the GP said it has no impact on the levels, as they are higher on the low dose compared to the higher dosages I have been on over the last two years.

    The A & E nurse told me that I was having a hyper episode (no actual information on the levels for me to compare with) and gave me something through a drip - no idea what. Once the drip had been going for a while, the nurse checked them and told me they were now 13.6, which she seemed happy with - so the mind boggles as to what they were before! Once the drip had finished, I was then allowed home but no advice given about the hyper. No paperwork had been received by the GP on the three occasions they saw me, so they couldn't answer my concerns.

    Two days later, I'm an inpatient, sent in for same reason, abdo pain. They took my reading before bed and it was 14.6. I had not eaten since lunchtime, so not sure if that was why. Then on waking the next morning where I only had fluids, it was 10.1. Before lunch, it was 10.3 sitll on clear fluids. As I had not eaten since the day before, I have no idea what the levels should have been at this point and the nurses couldn't tell me either.

    Once they had done the ultrasound, I was told could go home and yet still,, discharged with no diabetic advice etc on coping, maintaining and controlling high blood sugar levels.. I am well versed on treating a hypo's, as suffered for years with them - so much easier to deal with, yet I have no idea how to control my blood sugars when high. I know that I have to eat carbs but not what to do if they are continually high and symptoms getting worse. I really am concerned that too many visits to the GP might be seen as 'attention seeking' or hypochondria or I be seen as a nuisance. I currently feel like I am about to pitch a tent outside the hospital as seen so much of it in the last two weeks!

    Today, I had to fast from 7AM as I was having another ultrasound. I wasnt feeling too well, so I took my blood sugar level around 2pm. They were 17.6! Symptoms I am experiencing is being very thirsty, having extreme fatigue, I've had thrush both types for a couple of months now (medication side affect but could also be related to the high blood sugars), plus feeling a bit disorientated and difficult processing information. My vision keeps going really badly blurred and I feel nauseaous all the time but not sure if its the abdo pain causing the nausea or if its the medications I am taking for various conditions or related to my eye conditions..

    Once I had my scan, I was allowed to eat, so had a pack of pummy bears crisps as they gluten free and a banana plus a can of cream soda - I thought that this would keep me going until I got home. I have no idea what I am supposed to do in term sof treating high blood sugars as not seen a dietician yet. Discussions with the diabetic nurse is diffiuclt as she has no information when dealing with allergies/intollerance dietary issues. Although I saw the GP regarding the blood sugars, she was rushed so was unable to spend time talking through my concerns.

    I am well versed on treating a hypo, as suffered for years with them - so much easier to deal with, despite the issues. Trying to deal with hypers when I have no information, is difficult - you may wonder why I have not got the necessary information - its becuase I am on a gluten free diet but I also have allergies and intolerance problems so I can't just pick up pre-prepared food from a supermarket (unless its absolutely necessary with nothing else available or follow the diets as with all my other restrictions, it is too difficult to work thorugh.

    For the last month, I have been eating (or tyring to eat) every couple of hours, hence diffiuclt to measure blood sugars as need to have a break. This has not helped. So thought try to eat smaller meals as used to do but add in snacks like the pommy bears or the fruit or toast and see if helps. All is hopeless as it seem sno matter what I do, the high blood sugars are still not getting down below 10 at the moment and I am worried about the implications this will have long term if not sorted soon.

    I am getting really worried. If I'm having hyper's regularly as it appears to be, then what can I do? How can I solve the food issues, when should I see a doctor or contact a hospital? Is it safe just to stay at home or should I be concerned and raise my concerns with the medical profession? To give you an idea on my fatigue, I have not woken up for hours, on some occaions, not got up till late afternoon. I am wondering if this is that my blood sugars were at the time so high that I couldn't wake up - does that make sense? Then obviously, because of lack of food, a viscious circle starts.. When I get up some days, I keep drifting off to sleep as so tired. As this is a regular occurance, I'm thinking it may well be that my blood sugars are so high and thus my body is reacting by staying asleep.

    Life can and is very difficult for me and I hate my body and my life. I'm so restricted and from what I've read on literature from the nurse, excersies is the means to the end...but what if as in my case, you are unable to do the excercises due to other conditions - what then?

    Sorry, life is a b**** to me at present.

    Anyone else with type 2 experiencing similar issues or am I just going MAD!!!!!
     
  2. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    570
    Likes Received:
    335
    Trophy Points:
    103
    You really shouldn't be drinking sodas, pure sugar water, add things like that to uncontrolled blood sugar levels and you will end up very sick. I do not low carb, but if your sugars are high unless you have insulin to adjust for that, you are just adding to your too high numbers.

    But when things don't make sense, like in your case medications not working now and your numbers going up, you will have to change your eating habits if you are a type 2 or you could be a misdiagnosed type 1. You will need to be tested to find that out. Too many of us are misdiagnosed still as an adult. LADA/type 1 and much slower developing. It can take years which might explain not being that bad to having very high numbers now if you've stopped most of your insulin production.

    @DCUKMod I think there is an intro packet of information that is helpful?
     
    • Like Like x 1
    #2 Marie 2, Jul 25, 2019 at 4:14 AM
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2019
  3. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    570
    Likes Received:
    335
    Trophy Points:
    103
  4. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,936
    Likes Received:
    1,671
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Sorry you are having such a rough time at the moment.

    I am not sure what you mean when you talk about eating carbs. As a T2 these should be avoided like the plague. Toast, crisps, soda, banana are all no go areas for me.

    Steroids, stress etc will raise your blood glucose. Carbs will raise your blood glucose. It doesn't matter what colour they are. Brown rice instead of white, same for bread, pasta etc. The dietary information handed out to diabetics is just plain wrong.

    Have a look at the low carb forum, ask questions. Hopefully we can help.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  5. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,148
    Likes Received:
    1,923
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Hi @whyme_again
    Oh my... Absolutely everything's going wrong, hasn't it? I want to start with the Reactive Hypoglycemia, as it seems no-one's told you over all this time how to actually treat it, rather than just tackle the hypo's: Low carb. You don't need carbs. And the name reactive hypoglycemia gives it away, really... Your body is overreacting to a spike in bloodglucose, brought on by carbs. Your insulin production overshoots its target, giving you a hypo. If there's no spike for your body to respond to, there's no overreaction, hence, no hypo... If you'd steered clear of soda's, pommy bears, banana's and whatnot, there wouldn't've been any hypo's to begin with. I'm so sorry, someone really, really let the ball drop there. Thing is, with type 2 and high bloodsugars, treatment, in dietary terms, is the same as it would be for reactive hypoglycemia: low carb. It's the carbs that make your bloodsugars rise. That means anything with sugar and starches, so aside from the straight sugars, that means anything made with grains, like bread and such, cereal, rice, pasta, corn, potatoes, most fruits save for berries.... All of that should've been off your menu from the beginning of your RH problems. (And most likely it would've staved off T2 for a good while longer to boot)...

    I'm so sorry. Your bloodsugars have been bouncing all over the place while they could have been kept on a relatively even keel all along, if you'd just kept the carbs to a minimum. :(

    As for right now, steroids, even small amounts, will make bloodsugars rise. Some people who take them for a flare-up may need insulin temporarily, but if it's a small-ish dose, just dietary changes and/or oral meds could suffice. But yes, those 5mg's do make a difference. Others here have to take steroids continuously and are doing alright on diet, and I have a steroid shot every now and again, but it doesn't spike me any higher than an 8 or 9 anymore, for about 3 days. I'm on a keto diet myself, whch in your case, may be advisable too. Should you choose to try it it'll be a kick in the head for a week or so, with headaches, muscle and joint ache, brain fog and whatnot, but once you're out at the other end of it you'll feel like a new person. (Keto is 20 grams of carbs a day or less, moderate protein, high in fats). Also, considering your medication, the combination of keto and your meds could cause hypo's, so keep an eye out. And another thing... Do you have a meter? You really, really need one to know where you're at. So look into getting one, if you're going to change anything in your diet especially.

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/blog-entry/the-nutritional-thingy.2330/ is my little quick-start-guide... Maybe it'll be useful, maybe not. But I do hope that this week'll be a big turning point for you and your health. Things CAN be better than they are right now, I promise you! (By the way, carbs are inflammatory foods.... Once i cut those out for the most part, my rheumatism subsided almost completely. If I botch it up I feel it, but.... That rarely happens anymore. Thought I'd mention it as it might be of interest, with the steroids. I should be on a small steady dose like you. I don't need them though.)

    Good luck!
    Jo
     
    • Winner Winner x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 1
    #5 JoKalsbeek, Jul 25, 2019 at 10:08 AM
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2019
  6. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    84
    Trophy Points:
    48
    I just want to emphasis the following and reference these other posts:
    Get another test done to confirm that you are a Type 2 Diabetic rather than a wrongly diagnosed Type 1 . Good advice for a Type 2 can be dangerous for a Type 1.
    You mention getting Hypos as well as Hypers. A T2 diabetic will only get Hypos if they are on a Blood Glucose lowering medication such as Insulin.

    If you are a Type 2 and are following the Diabetes specialists advice in eating such High Carb and High Glycemic Index items
    such as Sodas, Crisps and Bananas, then my honest opinion is that they are misguidedly killing you. The long held medical opinion for Type2 Diabetes will tend to do that.

    If you are definitely Type2 then you need to avoid all carbs - even things like fruit and vegetables like Carrots as well as the more obvious Potatoes.

     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,312
    Likes Received:
    1,321
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I agree with all the above. As a type 2 despite being on the medications you are on you are eating way too many carbs which just keep putting your numbers up. It’s possible you could be a type 1 misdiagnosed so worth asking to be double checked by the doctor definitely, but with such high carbs it could easily still be type 2.

    Is it alogliptin and gliclazide you are on? Both work to increase the amount of insulin your body makes. Gliclazide can cause you to go hypo if you don’t have the assumed amount of carbs in your body hence the advice to eat carbs. But it sounds like you are quite heavily overdoing it. The symptoms you give could easily be down to the high numbers. High carb food and frequent snacks will make these worse not better. I’d guess that it was insulin you were given by drip in hospital but it’s only a guess.

    You need to ask medical staff what your numbers are and names of any tests they do and any medication they give you. Ask them to write it down if necessary. Sadly some advice out there even from specialist nurses is very outdated and frankly wrong in today’s knowledge. We have to be our own knowledgeable advocates to understand our condition and treatment not blindly follow orders without understanding them. You are entitled to copies of all blood test results from your surgery. Get them and keep them.

    You really need to reduce carbs til you get decent numbers. So you need to be testing. Multiple times a day. Anyone on gliclazide usually gets meter, especially if they are a driver, to check for and avoid hypos. You really need one and to use it.

    Test immediately before eating then 2 hrs afterwards. This will show you what the food did to your levels. Soda, crisps, bananas and toast are all likely to send it sky high! Fewer big meals are much better than lots of snacks. Make sure you check whilst lowering the carbs so that you don’t cut too many and go hypo. Be aware that as you’ve been running high for some time any reduction could give you a false hypo where it feels like one but is really just a protest at the sugar withdrawal. They stop when you get used to new better levels. So if you feel “off” then again check the actual numbers and react accordingly. Treating a false hypo with carbs will prolong the adjustment period

    Once stable you can then discuss reducing medications and only then reduce carbs further. Medication needs to match diet not the other way around

    This page explains what low carb eating involves https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb and this one has some great visuals to guide you on what’s good to eat https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/keto/visual-guides

    And https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/category/success-stories-and-testimonials.43/ to show it really works and for motivation

    and https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/what-have-you-eaten-today.75781/ for food ideas

    I’m sorry this is long but you’ve had such uninformed care til now I desperately want to give you the knowledge to help yourself.
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  8. ChrisWillUK

    ChrisWillUK · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hi
    My heart goes out to you just a bit of someone's time with them asking you what you are doing and then explaining how to improve your diet. Keep reading these forums they have been a Godsend to me. You will learn a lot if you follow the advice on what to read givrn by others who have replied to you.

    When I read what you had as a snack before going home - OMG - I wanted to drag them out of your hands. I've just done a quick check of the carbs in those products - that tiny packet of Pom bears 9.6g, can of cream soda 45.9g, medium banana 27g - a total of 82.5g in that snack. This more than many of us diagnosed with Type 2 would eat in a day.

    Please take care and look for low carb foods. It is working for me and many others. Gluten free isn't a problem because we don't need to eat wheat or anything else that has gluten in it.

    Good luck, all the very best and keep posting
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,581
    Likes Received:
    952
    Trophy Points:
    153
    I agree with all the previous posts, particularly that by @HSSS
    I'm going to tag in @Brunneria , who I believe has RH and also insulin resistance (though I don't know whether that ever turned into T2).

    Your medical care, at least as regards the diabetes, appears to have been lacking, please see your doctor and get him/her to help you. Those blood sugar levels are dangerous (and even lethal in the short term if you are a misdiagnosed T1). You are not being a hypochondriac, you need help.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. whyme_again

    whyme_again Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Hi, thanks for all the advice, much appreciated.

    I saw the Dr on Monday and apparently I now have a water infection which he says is making levels high. So now added antibiotics to my rattlers....

    I told him my blood sugar was 18.6, so he then tested and was 18. Said if after antibiotics the blood sugars don't reduce then considering adding in lunchtime meds as well. If they reach 20, then straight to A and E.

    I just feel so exhausted all the time, my sight is really affected so blurred all the time but luckily I already have hospital appointment booked so one less thing to fight about.

    Life was so much easier when was reactive hypo as new exactly how to sort but this....it's a nightmare. Although been referred for dietary advice, the clinics keep closing due to lack of funding or due to issues related to their running...can't remember what nurse said. So currently I'm on another waiting list and in the meantime trying to work my way around the mountain of information and how I can work it with my dietary restrictions.

    That's life I guess...
     
  11. ShortStuff

    ShortStuff · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    49
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I’m sorry you’re going through so much

    I think you need to push them to check that you are T2, not LADA

    If you are T2, anyone who told you to eat carbs doesn’t know what they’re talking about

    I think Dr Briffa’s book ‘Escape the Diet Trap’ is fab, it is easy to read, but explains things well.

    If you read all the links others have posted you’ll be able to start taking more control over your health & your meds. Unfortunately it’s just not wise to leave it all to your GP/DN/Hospital because they simply don’t have the time or belief in adjusting your diet to lower carbs

    I’m not surprised you feel dreadful high BGL and all of those meds - plus your other complications
    But I really do think doing lots of reading and understanding what the carbs & meds are doing to your body will really help you take control & when you do, you’ll feel a whole lot better
     
  12. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,263
    Likes Received:
    1,633
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Sorry to hear about your troubles. Many of us have gone down that path before... hopt things get sorted out for you.

    Meanwhile have a look at this part of the forum...
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/category/reactive-hypoglycemia.70/

    You may be surprised to find that the general solution to RH and T2D is remarkably similar...
     
  13. whyme_again

    whyme_again Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    41
    I was having a slice of toast at night because my medication requires me to eat with them. Toast is easiest option. Have stopped eating the toast now to see what difference it makes. Firstly, I've been having regular hypo's, so obviously, maybe not a good option. With my body working edifferently to other people's, perhaps treating my type 2 might also be different. Time will tell I guess.
     
  14. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,312
    Likes Received:
    1,321
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Sorry, are you saying cutting the toast out caused you to go hypo? From such high numbers to hypo sounds unlikely to be a type 2 reaction, more the RH element, unless it’s a lot of toast. What actual numbers are we talking before and after eating? Are you basing this on meter measurements or feelings of being “off”?

    Have you done anything about lowering your carbs and self testing and did you get type 1 or LADA ruled out yet?

    What do you mean about your body working differently? I mean sure we are all individual, especially taking other conditions into the big picture, but within this forum we’ve got a lot a human hours of diabetes and research of the subject under our collective belts and most things have been come across before by someone, maybe lots of someone’s.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. whyme_again

    whyme_again Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Well....yesterday I found out that a simple half slice of ham, two slices of tomato in a lightly butterred roll was my enemy....my blood sugar went from 2.5 up to 15 in the space of 30 mins but then increased to 21.8 by the time it was hour after eating. Just so glad didn't eat the banana as well!
     
  16. whyme_again

    whyme_again Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Its only one slice of buttered toast. I don't eat big meals....mine are like kids meal size.

    I had my evening meal the other night and my daughters reaction was "mum is that all your eating - what about veg?" I had a small oven baked jacket potato with a slice of Turkey. So she added in a few carrots and a small amount of peas (have to be very careful with green vegetables).

    Can't remember what my BS was after the meal.

    If you think about the size of a shop sold jacket potato, then imagine receiving only a quarter of that size. A few carrots, four or five small ones plus around ten peas and a small shop sliced Turkey....that is my size of meal.

    I try to follow the low glymix dietary sheet but there are a lot where we have to adapt because of my dietary restrictions and allergy issues. Hence the difficulties the nurse has in guidance and her request for my referral to the dietician as my conditions are so complex that the ordinary every day advice sheets are I guess you could say, inadequate.

    I just have to get through the next three days and then see the GP on Monday....
     
    #16 whyme_again, Aug 16, 2019 at 7:25 AM
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2019 at 7:49 AM
  17. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    84
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Why do you have to be careful with green veg?
    For many/most of us Type 2 's a Jacket potato - any potato (including sweet potato) is like eating poison.
    Is it OK for you? - Have you tested?


    For some like me, any root veg such as carrots, parsnips, beetroot, turnip, swede are also bad - my meter decided!
    For me peas and beans are OK in small quantities, but Cauliflower, Broccoli and 'salad leaf' type veg are all OK as are courgette and cucumber. Avocado is great I add it to most salads and have it with smoked fish (Salmon or Mackeral) at least once per week.
    I can tolerate a few berries but only if I have them with lots of cream or full-fat plain yoghurt - other fruit are mostly forbidden though a few I will eat half a fruit shared with my wife.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  18. Route 66

    Route 66 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    38
    So sorry that you are going through such a rough time at the moment.

    You have had some great advice from some very knowledgeable people on here.

    Please follow their advice and you will start to feel better.

    Cream soda, Pommy Bears, Potatoes, toast etc etc are making things so bad for you. They are a lot of the problem, as they are all putting high levels of sugar into your body and pushing your numbers up so very high. Like most of us, your body cannot accept them.

    Try cutting out the things that contain high levels of sugar or convert to sugar and you will feel much better and your BG levels will come down. From these high levels its very unlikely that you will suffer a Hypo.

    Good luck and there can be light at the end of the tunnel. The answers are often in our own hands.
     
    #18 Route 66, Aug 16, 2019 at 9:20 AM
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2019 at 9:39 AM
  19. aealexandrou

    aealexandrou Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    38
    You seem to be expecting your medication to cure you. That is not going to happen. The best they can do is keep your condition stable for a short time, and unless you, no one else, gets to grips with it, you will get progressively worse. You need to act now. Stop the carbs. Go LCHF or Keto, it's not a diet. For a T2D it's an essential lifestyle.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  20. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,312
    Likes Received:
    1,321
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Please excuse my editing of your comment but the roll was the problem not the ham or tomato.

    The glycemic index doesn’t always reflect the effect the carbs will have. Many here find, whilst a rough guide, it can have some serious inaccuracies when tested by our meters.

    For now you need to test test and test some more. Anything like actual sugar, bread, rice, pasta, potatoes, other root vegetables possibly, (maybe even peas and sweet corn as despite being above ground veg they are sweeter than most other above ground), any cereals including oats, anything with flour (unless a nut flour), legumes like beans and chickpeas too check very carefully. No matter if it’s brown, or wholemeal too! These are likely to be the things driving the blood glucose up.

    Check 2 hrs after and if it’s more than 2mmol higher than before eating it had too many carbs. Either drop the carb items completely or reduce them significantly.

    Make up for the lack of calories with protein and healthy fats. Fat is not the demon you’ve been told it is. It won’t make you fat on its own and it won’t mess up your cholesterol either. Lots of evidence available in here to prove both points if you want it.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook