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What should blood sugar be one hour after eating?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Stefmjxo, Dec 31, 2019.

  1. Stefmjxo

    Stefmjxo · Member

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    I can't find any information anywhere on this, just that it should be under 140 after two hours. Trying to make sure my A1C is good so I've been checking at 2 hours, but it occured to me that I may be spiking even higher at the one hour mark. Test strips are expensive and I'm not sure when the best time to test is, does the spike not matter if you're in normal range by 2 hours? I don't want to test at both times, I just wish I knew which one was more telling.

    Tonight had a Chipotle burrito bowl with brown rice, tested early at 1hr 143mg, at two hours I was 113mg.

    Does the spike affect the A1C more, or does the fact that you're normal at the 2 hr mark matter more?
     
  2. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    So as to have something consistent to work to the usual tests are done just before starting to eat and again two hours after that. It seems to give a good indication of how the meal is being dealt with, and if the meal is too high in carbs in the first place. A difference of two whole numbers, if measuring in mmol/l is good, which is a difference of - I believe 36 in other units.
    I think that by A1c you mean the Hba1c test - which shows the average level of blood glucose, but it doesn't differentiate between a fairly steady level of blood glucose and one where levels are up and down all the time.
     
  3. Stefmjxo

    Stefmjxo · Member

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    Thanks, I just read pp spikes can affect the result and not knowing what my spike is since I've been testing only at 2 hours kind of concerned me since I have no idea what it is. What if it's really high and I'm normal at 2 hours, does the spike even matter if my body dealt with it appropriately and I'm under 140?
     
  4. mouseee

    mouseee · Well-Known Member

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    It will affect it but only as part of the average as that's pretty much what the hba1c measures.

    Pretty much all food with a bit of carbs in will change your blood sugar. The reason for testing is more to know which food to avoid in the future to keep it steady. So rice, for instance, definitely out for me as a few bits if sushi pushed me right up. I wont worry too much if my bs goes up but I know to avoid it next time. It's a bit like a food elimination diet for intolerances.

    I don't do this perfectly as this christmas has shown!!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    113 after 2 hours is pretty good. Since you dropped to such a nice level you might have been normal in another 15 minutes that would still be good. Fat can slow down carbs being metabolized and even insulin working as fast and it was a slightly higher carb meal.

    Even normal people have a little higher spike after eating higher carbs at the hour point, so testing in an hour really doesn't mean much.

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetes_care/blood-sugar-level-ranges.html
    https://www.diabeteschart.org/mgmmol.html
     
  6. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    You might like to read this article by Jenny Ruhl:
    https://www.bloodsugar101.com/healthy-blood-sugar-targets
    She is T2, has written several useful books on T2 diabetes, and has survived to be over 70 without suffering major complications, which suggests her well-researched advice is likely to be good.
     
  7. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I am assuming you are Type 2. Firstly I would work towards a "safe list" of foods / meals, by testing before and at 30 minute intervals up to 3 hours (your health is worth the initial expense). The 30 minute I think is important due to seeing what for example a banana does to otherwise healthy younger people, and this 2 hour mark hiding the spike.

    Once you have the list of meals that work then I would revert to fasting blood glucose and 2 hour tests.

    My "safe list" is varied and complete, and produces fbg's between 3.9 and 4.4 and post prandial readings never above 6.0. I know my after fbg and moving around increases bg to around 4.8 to 5.0. I know that mainly carnivory reduces fbg by around 0.3 mmol and that heavy exercise (above my normal) results in an up to 0.5 drop (once got a fbg of 3.3 on my heaviest ever session the day before). I really do advocate building a picture of how you individually react.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  8. Stefmjxo

    Stefmjxo · Member

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    Thank you everyone. I am not a t2 but in the prediabetic range. I appreciate all of your replies and articles!
     
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