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Who on here eats a ' normal diet"......

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Indy1282, Feb 13, 2019.

  1. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    It is one thing I haven’t checked out. My impression is that it is packed out with bread or something. It might vary between type and source.

    This version from Asda seems to be low carb but that is per serving.

    https://www.fitbit.com/foods/Black+Pudding/537173955
     
  2. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I eat what is normal for me!
    Lowish carb in the week, higher at the weekend when a girl just wants to have fun. If I go out to someone’s house I eat what they have produced and keep a carful watch over rises. As a type 1 wearing a Libre I have found ultra low carbing more difficult to control than moderate. I don’t take large amounts of insulin anyway. I find that the blood sugars will behave much better in the hours after eating if the meal has a small amount of carbs in it. As a rule I no longer eat potatoes, rice, bread or pasta. But it doesn’t mean I am never going to eat them. The main carbs for me in a meal will be fruit. I always finish a meal with a piece of fruit, nuts and a piece of 90% chocolate.
    What I rarely eat are desserts, not because I can’t, but because I find them too sweet.
    @Indy1282 i am presuming you are Type 1 as you have posted on the Type 1 page. I think perhaps to feel less fed up you need to let yourself go occasionally. Use the Libre as a tool and inject more insulin later if you feel you have underestimated. It is not human nature to deprive ourselves day in day out, when in fact we don’t have to.
     
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  3. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That’s actually about 23% carbohydrate: 8.7g per 37g. I’ll give it a miss. Just goes to show how nutrition labels can be misleading.
     
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  4. Big_Col

    Big_Col Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Me too. Hba1c of 36. Never had any training, just guestimate Insulin. It can be done.

    I don't worry about diabetes at all. Perhaps that's the secret.
     
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  5. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Worth noting for the less knowledgeable readers: many of the comments here come from type 1 diabetics or those who otherwise use exogenous insulin. Generally speaking their dietary management will be quite different to a type 2, particularly those who are non-insulin dependant.
     
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  6. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Normal!?
    Well I eat what everyone else is eating in the house. Just I weigh mine out and count carbs. I will not shy away from anything. As long as I carb count correctly and give myself the correct amount of insulin then, the same as @Knikki, nothing is off limits :)
     
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  7. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    This thread is in the Type 1 sub-forum so it is not surprising that many of the comments come from people with type 1 diabetes.
     
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  8. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what is a "normal diet".
    I do not eat low carb.
    I also do not eat meat. So I eat a lot of fruit, veg and fish.
    I also eat carbs when I want including pasta, pizza, rice, bread, cake, biscuits, ...

    I was diagnosed with type 1 in my 30s and it has made little difference to what and when I eat.
    I probably eat more of most things (except salt which I rarely add to food and rarely eat processed food with salt added) than most people (with or without diabetes) but I am not overweight and diabetes is the only health-related condition I have.
     
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  9. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Indy1282, "Normal diet' covers a multitude of ideas. The food industry has been influencing Governments, health professionals and the general public for years. We have all been conditioned to identify certain foods as part of a normal, so-called healthy diet.
    But normal and 'healthy' for whom?? Cannot trust the Government, some health professionals, trilas demonstrating healthy food products can be rigged. "Normal' is not necessarily OK
    In fact "normal" Big Food-influenced stuff it is a shocker for many of us.
    Why do you think diabetes is increasing? Why are so many on tablets?
    Obesity in the modern world started to rise when carbs increased in our diets, at a time when consumption of fats was falling.
    Whatever I eat that puts my BSLs up too high, which risks rotting my teeth, or in combination with other foods leaves me deficient in protein, fats, vitamins and minerals is and my weight below or above a normal range is the WRONG diet for me.
    We can all relate to the desire for a burger or cottage pie etc but who is calling the shots unless you can source good ingredients and cook it yourself with whatever gives you the right combination to keep BSLs OK?
    Without further info on your type of diabetes etc I am not able to answer more specifically.
    Best Wishes.:):):)
     
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  10. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    I think from a blood glucose point of view is that if you can manage your insulin to suit the food passing your lips and avoid going high then there's no reason why you can't eat what you want, the whole point to taking quick acting insulin is that you manage the carbs eaten with the insulin taken, or pre-bolus to avoid the spike and going high without the need for corrections, then what you eat is your decision, I know it's incredibly over whelming for newbies to get diet rammed down their necks when they are trying to manage life and living with insulin and diabetes, but if you are finding that your levels are soaring north and south then you need to review what and how much you eat to cope with this and of course review your insulin ratios too which can change during the course of the day and dependent on your activity levels.

    A note to all - this is a type 1 thread in the type 1 section, please also remain on topic :)
     
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  11. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I don't want to speak for them as it is not my place, but I note only 2 members I have seen on this forum who eat a higher carb diet and have a non - diabetic level of A1C (who are Type 2). They post in the Type 2s: What was your fasting blood glucose in a morning? (very low chat level) and T2s: What was your fasting BG this morning, and what did you eat yesterday? The food one of them eats in particular is generally outside of what many of the anecdotes on this site digest, and the carb content somewhere between circa 175 and 200 grams (circa 2000 cals). Both exercise to a high level.
     
  12. PeterHud

    PeterHud Type 1 · Active Member

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    As eat what I did before apart from the sweet stuff.

    I .now finding is if I eat more carbs then more insulin.if I go walking which I have done over the last few days then not as much insulin but still snack.

    It's a case of balance and haven't hypo'd for over a month.

    After the initial shock of it all it is just a case I can do what I did before I just lacked insulin.
     
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  13. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That’s a very good point and duly noted.
     
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  14. Ponchu

    Ponchu · Well-Known Member

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    Maybe we eat “normal” (whole foods) and society eats to sickness (processed sugars)?
     
  15. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Great question and impossible to answer other than as very unique individuals. Most people will consider what they choose to eat as normal, for example those on very low carb (under 20 say) will consider that as normal and anything over that as abnormal. I eat around 60 carbs a day and to me that's normal but to someone on 100carbs it's probably thought of as low carb but high carb to others! A 'normal' as in the average in the general population diet (here in the UK anyway) is probably one that contains bread/potatoes/pasta with a generous sprinkling of biscuits/cakes/puddings. I don't call that normal as the word normal indicates the 'right' thing to do....and we all know it isn't for everyone. I agree with others, if you can keep your diabetes under control then that's the main thing however you do it.
     
    #35 KK123, Feb 14, 2019 at 1:57 PM
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2019
  16. SlimLizzy

    SlimLizzy Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    you could make a lower carb cottage pie, just add some veg, celariac, carrots or swede to the potato topping. About half and half veg to potato. I like to mash the potato smooth, with a generous knob of butter, and the veg more roughly, so you get little pieces of colour. Topping should be about half the depth of the meat layer. Serve with green veg.
    Looks pretty and tastes nice.
    Would this qualify as normal food for you?
     
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  17. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I would like to see an accepted definition of hi carb, low carb, no carb etc etc as it is like a soft and hard Brexit at the moment, a little ambiguous on the detail. :D
     
    #37 Listlad, Feb 14, 2019 at 2:36 PM
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2019
  18. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Why?
    In my experience, I eat carbs, vegetables, fish etc. that suit my body and lifestyle. I don't care whether it is considered high carb, low carb, no carb (scrub that - I know it is not no carb), vegetarian, pescatarian, vegaquarian, Helenarium, .... It is the diet that I believe is right for me and I don't need to name it or put in a box.

    With diabetes, weigh loss, weight gain, detox, ... whatever diet we eat, I believe we should work out what we need, what we like, what we want to achieve, what we are willing to accept, what role food plays in our lives, ... and adopt what suits those parameters rather than blindly following a diet devised by someone else that suits their body, Sure, we can use other people's experience and science as a basis for what we eat ourselves but there is no need to accurate classify it.
     
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  19. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Quick reply.

    Words like low and high are all relative. As was posted earlier in the thread. It helps to define them. It would be very simple to devise.
     
    #39 Listlad, Feb 14, 2019 at 3:00 PM
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2019
  20. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    There are no binaries. It’s all sliding scales and twisting knobs. Much like this;

    [​IMG]
     
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