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5 things any newly diagnosed type 1 should know

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Juicyj, Jul 4, 2020.

  1. Lynnzhealth

    Lynnzhealth Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    At this time, COVID, it's very difficult to see a counsellor and our mental health support group closed down in 2019, just when we really need it. I guess it's just one day at a time. Thanks and take care.
     
  2. AlisaFrost

    AlisaFrost · Newbie

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    Great article. Actually, I don`t suffer from diabetes but my dad has type 1 and this is information could be useful for him. Thank you for this information
     
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  3. Lynnzhealth

    Lynnzhealth Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm glad your sister has your support, DanutaMorks. I have to say with all the ups and downs that my latest A1C was 7.1. YIPPEE! As long as it keeps going down I'm happy. I have to get back to reading Dr. Bernstein's book because things slip through the holes in my memory. And, I have been eating more protein and that helps a lot. A funny thing, though. I'm not sure if anyone else experiences this, however when I do heavy exercise, like shovelling, my BG goes up. I can walk along with my dog at a less strenuous pace and it goes down. I have been feeling better this past month, so that's a good thing. Good luck to all in this journey. Stay safe and stay well.
     
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  4. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
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    Hello @Lynnzhealth

    It depends on the exercise for me too - digging or mowing drops me like a ton of bricks but a steady run for 40 mins keeps me flat. It’s best not to have any quick acting insulin onboard when you do more strenuous activity or have a carby snack beforehand and stop every 30 mins to test and check, exercise is good for mental well-being though so always make sure you have a plan before you do anything so you are prepared.
     
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  5. ArsenalCath

    ArsenalCath Type 1 · Member

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    Since being diagnosed with type 1 and having insulin injections I gave put in a phenomenal amount of weight. I’m blaming the insulin as my Carb Manager app says I very rarely go over 1000 calories a day. I need to lose weight as it is making me thoroughly miserable. I hate having diabetes type 1. I’m seriously considering not eating carbs and not having insulin. I know what will happen as before diagnosis I was hardly eating anything as food tasted foul but my weight was good. Then diagnosis, but my blood glucose is rarely within range it’s nearly always high so have to have large doses of insulin. I have spoken to my diabetes team so often but I still don’t understand what the hell is going on with my rotten body..
     
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  6. ArsenalCath

    ArsenalCath Type 1 · Member

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    If we are advised to nit have fast acting insulin before exercise as exercise reduces our glucose levels what is going on? If our body doesn’t produce insulin how does the glucose get into our cells without insulin? I just don’t get it.
     
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  7. Lynnzhealth

    Lynnzhealth Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I totally understand how you are feeling. I was first (mis)diagnosed as Type 2 when I was 69 in 2017. I totally changed my lifestyle (Keto) and managed to keep my A1C in the normal range and blood results were great, with no meds and no insulin. Suddenly, without warning, I went into a Diabetic Ketoacidosis episode and ended up in the ER in bad shape. There I was given the specialized test and I turned out to be T1 at 71. Unbelievable. I went through every emotion imaginable and had to learn everything all over again. Because the hospital doesn't understand just what diabetics should be eating, it totally threw me back into my old ways. It took me at least 9 months to get back on track. Now, I'm following a very low carb, protein, veggie way of eating. Trust me, many times I want to throw in the towel, too. I did not realize until just recently (nearly 73) just how badly it affected me for the past two years. I do have ups and downs with BG, and it boggles my mind. I find if I eat more protein my BG is better. My last A1C had come down from 7.6 to 7.1. Needless to say, my Diabetic Educator told me that that's a good range for me. No, I don't think so. I follow Dr. R. Bernstein's diabetes solution, other doctors who also have diabetes and know my A1C can be lower than that. She also doesn't like the Keto/low carb way of eating. I shake my head sometimes that the health professionals still think the old way is good. I can't believe the number of people I see where I live that follow their way and end up with amputations, heart problems and kidney dialysis and then die young. That is not for me. I only have one kidney and can't afford to tamper with that. My DE also told me not to worry about complications because they won't happen for probably 20 years. I couldn't believe she'd say that. If I eat carbs like she suggested my BG shoots up very high and it's hard to get it down. So, I don't do what she suggested. I also cook and bake following the Keto/low carb recipes in Dr. B's book and online from other followers of his and low carb lifestyle. It is definitely a roller coaster ride, however, I am learning what I need to do to keep me safe. Especially when I'm walking the dog, doing yard work or shovelling snow, etc. I also have data sheets where I keep track of readings before and after meals and the amts of insulin I take for each. That really keeps me on track. I was prescribed the glucose monitor/sensors because of my age, I suppose. I LOVE it. I really, really hope that you can figure out what you can eat or not eat and continue to take insulin. You need that to survive, being a T1. You are not alone here, although many days it sure feels like it. Take care and I hope you can figure out what you need to do. HUGS!!
     
  8. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi Cath - insulin is a hormone which regulates the glucose in the body, exercise improves insulin sensitivity and if you have too much quick acting insulin in your system and start exercising then you are absorbing the glucose in your system and which puts you at risk of going hypo, so it's best to exercise without quick acting insulin on board. Your basal insulin covers your bodies needs as a background insulin, it's quick acting insulin which poses a problem if you're exercising.
     
  9. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi Cath,

    At the point we receive our diagnosis our bodies have been starved of energy for some time, it's difficult to say how long in your case but I know when I was diagnosed i'd lost well over a stone in weight and once I started insulin therapy my body adjusted and I put on weight, I started on a pump a number of years afterwards and put on some more then, I have since taken up running and run around 2-3 times a week so have converted some of that to muscle but haven't lost any weight, I eat a low carb diet and control my glucose levels as tightly as I can, I do this for a couple of reasons, firstly to improve my mental health, as i've found running high glucose levels made me depressed, where as if I can run a tighter range I am more focused and feel more relaxed, I sleep better which again impacts my mental health. Eating food doesn't need to be a pain, but getting used to food which has a better outcome on our blood glucose levels is my goal, can you use a libre at all to watch the impact of food on your glucose levels ?

    If you're levels are running high then you're not getting enough insulin, what will help as a starting point is to just keep a daily diary so recording the times for your blood glucose levels, food eaten/carbs consumed, insulin taken. Identifying patterns is key to getting better control, as you can show your team what you are doing, when and they can help you make adjustments. In time it's good to develop your knowledge and understanding more to help you make decisions.

    I know at the moment things seem hard and you hate your t1 but you have to learn to live with it, so reaching a point of acceptance so it can exist without emotion, sadly it's not going away but running high will be making you feel rubbish so hopefully use the diary to start seeing what's happening, when etc and you can start to bring your levels down with the right insulin dosing.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
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