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COVID 2019 Comorbidity with Diabetes

Discussion in 'Other Health Conditions and Diabetes' started by Bill_St, Feb 13, 2020.

  1. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    From a CNN email:
    I like that last sentence...
     
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  2. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    Looks like cats will have to self isolate in their own gardens! :)
     
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  3. jane1950

    jane1950 · Well-Known Member

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    what happens if you are type 1 diabetic, and not well controlled, and 69 years of age with high blood pressure, would it mean you would be hospitalised
     
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  4. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    No one can answer that, I am afraid.
    I have read reports of people of 104 and 97 coming through the coronavirus without major problems, and people in their teens and younger dying from it. Obviously, these younger deaths are very rare, and they get media coverage because of their rarity.

    Each and every one of us is an individual, and will experience COVID-19 differently.
    The majority of the population experience very mild or zero symptoms (which do not need hospitalisation), while a minority do require hospitalisation and an even smaller percentage then require additional treatment and a respiration.

    The UK government is currently asking people to take care of themselves at home unless the illness becomes so severe that the patient feels it necessary to ring 111. At which point they will be assessed over the phone and an ambulance will be sent if it is considered necessary.
     
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  5. Cobia

    Cobia LADA · Well-Known Member

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    And just a few days ago the ones that know best poo pooed the idea covid could go from humans to pets.... its still jumping species.
    China found the same thing with cats and dogs but i cant remember where i read it.
     
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  6. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    At least with tigers there's no problem convincing people of the advantage of social distancing.
     
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  7. jane1950

    jane1950 · Well-Known Member

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    UK Lockdown, some of the things the police cannot enforce, so anyone if they want to can take more than 1 walk a day, sometimes it helps to get out and find peaceful surroundings away from the home, but the police would not be able to enforce it, unless the country goes into proper lockdown with the army helping to enforce everything in the rules, and by changing the exercise to only a certain distance from your homes
     
  8. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    Or we can act unselfishly, and recognise that the more someone is outside, the more crowded it becomes, and fewer people can share the space.

    Taking more time outside our homes and gardens is taking away the chances for others to use the space safely.

    I get fed up of people using gaps in the advice to act selfishly.

    We are told to obey the spirit of the advice, not just the letter.
     
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  9. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    France has the rule that you can only go a certain distance from your home - and it is a very short distance. Every day each person has to complete an A4 permit form with details of why they are allowed out, where they live, and so on. It is so complicated it is putting folk off from leaving home. I heard a report on TV a week or so ago from a journalist who lives in France. He completed his permit correctly, went out for a jog, and was stopped by police because he was outside his permitted exercise zone by not very much. Sorry, can't remember all the details.
     
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  10. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am lucky enough to have a garden but if I was in a flat especially with children I would need some open space to go to. I think it was Harriet Harmon who suggested a rota in city parks.
     
  11. Struma

    Struma Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think your conscience should enforce this.
    We are all, in our own little way, making sacrifices.
     
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  12. jane1950

    jane1950 · Well-Known Member

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    I am still doing the social distance rule, as can walk to chichester canal and do it easily
     
  13. jane1950

    jane1950 · Well-Known Member

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    there is nothing wrong with the way I am doing it, as am certainly social distancing
     
  14. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    going out more than once to take exercise is selfish. Your presence outside makes the canal path more congested, stopping others from safely walking. Doing that twice a day stops others from safely being able to do it once a day. I am surprised you cannot see that.

    Once a day is essential exercise and OK
    Twice or more a day is stopping others from being able to do so.

    If everyone exercised outside twice a day, where is the space for others to do their once a day exercise? You are not more important than others.
     
  15. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    People's situations vary, it's difficult to make rules that are reasonable for everyone. I walked 3 miles yesterday over neighboring farmland and saw one person in the distance, I could have done the same again later with no effect on anyone. Where it is more crowded one walk a day gives more people the chance to exercise at a safe distance. Being too precise about the letter of the law rather than the spirit will result in dissent.
     
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  16. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    to judge someone for going out more than once a day or for the police to fine them for so doing is dystopian even if you agree that these measures will stop the spread of this virus and that his is necessary to prevent the sinking of the NHS.
    I have a dog and see people on my daily walk with him. But only at a distance which everyone is courteously respetful of. I see people stepping out into the road to achieve this and this is now possible given the 1950s level of traffic. it makes sense not to pick a narrow and crowded tow path. I live in a populated suburb of London and I trust the police and public to be sensible in complying with the spirit of the law and using the draconian powers very selectively.
    Orwell that ends well hopefully.
     
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  17. jane1950

    jane1950 · Well-Known Member

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    because the first walk is not round the canal, the first one is just round the block where I live, and then the second one to the canal, where there is hardly anyone else walking, except for one couple who seemed to be having something to eat at one of the picnic tables
     
  18. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    I am very impressed that you have a tow path that is 2 m wide, allowing you to comply with the social distancing rules.
    I have never seen a tow path that wide in the UK, and I have walked along quite a few.
    Where did you say it was again?
     
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  19. jane1950

    jane1950 · Well-Known Member

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    I dont go along the tow path, there is a place to sit at the basin entrance of canal, and also along the side there are steps, and I sometimes sit there and watch the ducks
     
  20. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    The irony is that the places where there is most need for air/exercise outside of the boundaries of the home, are exactly those where populations are most dense, open spaces smaller and less common and therefore in much demand.

    In the inner London area where I live, most people live in very small spaces, often with a number of other family members. The impact of lockdown, where the usual options for visiting shops, gyms, cinemas, pubs, friends homes have been removed is that there is severe pressure on outdoor spaces. Even early in the morning (and by early I mean starting out in darkness), there is a noticeable increase in human traffic in areas that might usually be deserted or very quiet.

    For me as a individual the solution has been to exercise in the very early morning and to change where and how I walk. My beloved canals, with their narrow towpaths are out. For the most part, the Thames Path is out as maintaining social distance is very difficult. However, back streets, smaller parks and the less ‘pretty’ outdoor spaces provide ample room for walking/jogging or whatever form of exercise takes your fancy.

    I have far more sympathy with families with young children living in cramped conditions spending a couple of hours in a park, at a safe distance from others or an elderly/disabled person with a car driving a short distance to exercise safely, than with those living in more fortunate circumstances (own garden, large indoor space) looking for ways to circumvent the rules, which may then result in a tightening of the rules for all.
     
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    #1340 Goonergal, Apr 6, 2020 at 5:14 PM
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2020
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