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Diagnosed today with little support!

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by MarieHirst81, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. MarieHirst81

    MarieHirst81 Prediabetes · Newbie

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    Hello

    I'm looking for some help. I went to the doctor after feeling really tired, exhausted actually, and among other things, the doctor told me I am pre diabetic. He said that I was at the top end of pre diabetic. He then ranted to me for the next 20 minutes on my lifestyle and making me feel like a child. His parting comment was - "so you're going to change your lifestyle". I left crying. I am also vitamin deficient and anaemic which explains the tiredness but he seemed to completely ignore that once he'd seen my blood sugar results.

    I'd just like some advice. My doctor gave me a sheet that says eat carbs every meal and come back in 6 months. I've read on here to cut carbs? Should I look into testing my own blood sugar?

    Thank you in advance. I am not in denial about my lifestyle but feel like a naughty school girl rather than someone who needs some support.

    Marie
     
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  2. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hello @MarieHirst81 Really sorry to hear of your experience today, sadly sounds like you met a GP lacking in empathy.

    Welcome to the forum, it's good that you've found the site as we do have an information pack for all new members tagging @daisy1 also have a good look round and ask away, lots of friendly members here happy to help and understand exactly what you're going through :)
     
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  3. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    Hi Marie and welcome!

    First things first: DON'T PANIC
    You are not unusual in arriving on the forum having recieved treatment like that from your friendly healthcare professional.

    What vitamins are you deficient in? And what has your doc told you to do about it? Have they prescribed supplements, or just told you to go away and eat 'a balanced diet'? Same for being anaemic.
    Both of those can affect your mood and energy levels profoundly.

    Diet info that Daisy will post for you is a good starting point, especially if you are feeling overwhelmed.

    At the moment, the most important thing to remember is that once you get a handle on this (being pre-diabetic, the vits and the anaemia) you WILL feel better than you do now, since each of those things will be affecting your mood and your energy levels and making you feel so dreadful.

    Don't worry, it is going to get better - and this forum is a lovely supportive, friendly place, bursting with information and ideas to help you through the process.
     
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  4. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My first piece of advice would be that if a doctor has you in tears in these circumstances then think about changing GPs or moving to a different Practice.

    Hello and welcome to the forum. The information regarding the amount of carbohydrates to be eaten at each meal is outmoded imo. All carbohydrates (including sugars) are turned into glucose once eaten/drunk and for those of us with Pre Diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes have to moderate our carb intake to gain better management of our blood glucose levels. Stick with us and you will soon get a handle on this condition. Ask as many questions as you like, there are some very knowledgeable members here and remember, whatever type of Diabetes we have we all remember what it was like to be diagnosed. Big hugs.
     
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  5. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome Marie! I’m so sorry you’ve received short shrift from your GP. The thing that strikes me as most important in your post is that you’ve been given a diagnosis of prediabetic on the basis of an HbA1c test taken while you are anaemic. It may not be accurate. @Bluetit1802 has a better knowledge on this than me. I believe there’s an alternative test that can be taken when you are anaemic. Maybe you could make an appt with a different GP and request this?
     
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    #5 Rachox, Feb 13, 2018 at 12:53 PM
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018
  6. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  7. Happyhomelands

    Happyhomelands · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Marie
    I can't give you technical advice because I'm very new. I can say the diagnosis is your first step to feeling so much better.
    In December I felt dreadful, I put it down to much age and job. In January I self tested my glucose levels, they were in the 7s and 8s. I was only able to access the practice nurse who sent me for a HB1 which came out at 50. Since then I have been reading lots, gradually reducing carbs, and monitoring glucose first thing, pre and post meals. I'm getting the glucose down, weight is beginning to shift and the best thing is I am feeling very different. I'm seeing a GP this week, so the official diagnosis and follow-up is still to come. My GP is lovely, I would advise you to choose a new one who you can feel comfortable with. Good luck. Remember the people on this forum will help you every step of the way.
     
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  8. Biggles2

    Biggles2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to this wonderful forum @MarieHirst81, you have come to the right place for support and encouragement!

    Has your doctor done additional work-up tests (e.g. Iron studies) to determine the cause of your anemia? Or, is the cause apparent (e.g. heavy periods)? I ask because iron deficiency anemia (IDA) can effect the HbA1c value, potentially giving a falsely high reading and IDA must be corrected in order to get a true HbA1c value.

    Here are 2 links that explain this issue in more detail:
    https://www.gpnotebook.co.uk/simplepage.cfm?ID=x20071228072816056327
    http://www.diabetologia-journal.org/files/English.pdf

    With regard to dietary advice, the standard Eatwell plate guidance is not suitable for those of us with prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes. There are far too many carbs, and carbs turn to glucose in our bodies leading to all sorts of metabolic issues: insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia (too much insulin) and weight gain, as too much insulin causes our bodies to store excess glucose/energy as fat. @daisy1 will provide great information, also take a look at the low carb programme on this site as well as the Diet Doctor site for ideas and delicious low-carb recipes:
    https://www.dietdoctor.com/
     
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  9. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I am eating low carb with lots of meat and fish eggs and cheese, plus lots of salad and low carb vegetables and seem to have lost full blown diabetes along the way.
    At the moment I only eat twice a day, and include 40 to 50 gm of carbs each day.
    You seem to have a very unpleasant doctor, and you have been given some poor advice for the management of your health or no help at all for some of your problems.
     
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  10. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 · Oracle

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    Hi, and welcome,

    The others are right about certain types of anaemia causing elevated HbA1c levels. (There are some types that cause a lower HbA1c) This is well known in the medical profession, and your GP should be aware of it. One test that is more suitable when anaemia is present is the Fructosamine test. Unfortunately, only a few labs in the UK analyse these tests and they are more expensive than the HbA1c so many GPs ignore them.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DG4FKXNUQAA2rMo.jpg
     
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  11. rmz80

    rmz80 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Cheer up doctors can get diabetes themselves so they will eventually get the 3rd degree from someone else!!
     
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  12. Incyb

    Incyb Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and welcome. Sorry you have an unempathetic GP. The GOOD news is that you've got the chance to get this sorted before it gets the chance to turn into full blown diabetes! Follow the advice here (ignoring the outmoded advice to eat carbs every meal) and you'll feel lots better in no time. Best wishes.
     
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  13. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @MarieHirst81

    Hello Marie and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  14. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If you are eating a standard UK diet that contains "ready meals" and "processed food", you will be able to increase your iron intake by eating more beef, beef is also great for diabetes as it does not increase blood glucose levels much unlike carbs. Also, advoid all drinks/food that contains any sugar.

    Remember that all green veg and most salad is low in carbs, so eat a lot of them, add a little butter or olive oil if you wish, but be careful with shop brought dressing as they can contain a lot of sugar. Try to eat 5 different colours of veg/salad each day, along with "meat that looks like meat" and "fish that looks like fish" and lots of eggs. Try to choose food that has had the lease processing, I now shop at Aldi as they are good value for fresh food.

    I have got my BG backs into the normal range by reducing the carbs I eat, my BG was high enough on the day I was diagnosed to get a personal 8am phone call from the GP when the lab results come in.

    Try to get a print out of all your results, or even better on-line access to them.
     
  15. Sue192

    Sue192 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    :(elcome to the Forum, @MarieHirst81. I am sorry to hear of your experience with your GP - what a cavalier attitude. Sadly, quite a few of us have landed here after less than helpful visits to GPs/DNs, but the Forum is a great place for support, advice and general info and hopefully you won't feel so down and abandoned once you've had a good rummage around the threads. And whatever you do, don't blame yourself - you most definitely aren't a naughty schoolgirl - as that will make things worse. As for your GP, if you can change then do. He could do with going back to bedside manner school....
     
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  16. NewTD2

    NewTD2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hope this helps and welcome!
    https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb
     
  17. jayney27

    jayney27 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Aww bless you, what an awful experience. I was totally shocked when I got my diagnosis in Oct 2017, it came out of the blue and I’m not ashamed to admit to some tears at my appointment with the diabetic nurse. However I chose to ignore her advice of eating a well balanced diet including carbs in favour of eating fewer carbs, I increased my exercise a little too and after my first check up last week I have done really well, my blood results have come down from 10.8 to 6.3 was also told I didn’t need to test my blood but gave in to natural curiosity about 4 weeks ago. Start slowly, give yourself time to adjust and get your head around your news then you will be ready to make the changes to improve your diagnosis, good luck, hope everything goes well.
     
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  18. Glink

    Glink Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Marie, I'm sorry you had such a rough diagnosis. Definitely see what you can do about the vitamin and iron deficiencies! I was iron deficient and had to take heme iron for a while there; it did help though, to an extent that non-heme iron never did. Also the above comments about the underlying cause of anemia are important.

    That said, assuming the prediabetes is "real" and not an artifact of the anemia (good points made about that above, though--might ask for another test of both), a lot of us here can empathize with being brushed off by doctors about it. For me, going immediately to a very low carb diet made HUGE changes, and within a few weeks the fatigue as well as my other symptoms were reduced incredibly. I found buying a metre and testing to see which foods really affected me was helpful as well.

    Hang in there--it does get better!
     
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  19. Kailee56

    Kailee56 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Oh, Marie, I am so sorry your physician treated you so terribly. Actually it makes me :banghead: and makes me want to hug you.

    Do not be disheartened. We all start out overwhelmed and under educated, (I am a work in progress), but you are definitely in the right place and have already gotten lots of good advice. I haven’t read all the posts, so sorry if I am repeating

    Yes, you should check your blood glucose levels. It is the only way you will be able to see the effects of specific foods on your glucose levels. Although a physician will follow you, you are in charge of the actual management. You can’t manage your blood glucose if you don’t know what it is. That simple.

    I totally agree with those who said you should get a different physician after the shabby treatment you received. Remember:
    You are the customer/consumer.
    You are paying for a service, either directly or via taxes.
    You may have different life and educational experiences, but that does not make you any less of a person than the doctor.
    You are not helpless.
    You are an adult and do not deserve to be treated in a demeaning, humiliating manner by anyone.
    Keeping this in mind, I would not only ask for a new physician, I would report this physician to what ever supervisory or ethics department there is. You were not treated in an adult or respectful manner, you did not get adequate information about the pre-diabetes, and your other health issues were mentioned with no treatment offered.

    Just my opinion.
     
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