1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Doctor says I have to stay on metformin

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Ian2477, May 11, 2019.

  1. jpscloud

    jpscloud Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    505
    Likes Received:
    762
    Trophy Points:
    133
    I use accuchek mobile and it is very accurate - the average was spot on when I had my 6 monthly HbA1c. There are cheaper monitors which will probably also be accurate.

    I test fasting BG, evening BG, during extended fasts to check I'm not too low, and when off the rails eating more carbs than I should, to check how high I am going. It motivates me to get back to low carbing, so rather than accuracy being the objective, I am looking at trends and keeping a close eye on my condition.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  2. jpscloud

    jpscloud Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    505
    Likes Received:
    762
    Trophy Points:
    133
    I test to keep an eye on my condition. When I was in denial, and not testing, my HbA1c was rising each time I had bloods done. Testing has helped me to reverse that trend - without it, I would be likely to lose motivation and slip back into denial. We are all different, yes, and so testing works to help some of us to manage and even improve our condition, but not others who may be less prone to lapsing.

    If I never lapsed, I would be able to stop testing. Sadly, that isn't possible for me yet.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,520
    Likes Received:
    926
    Trophy Points:
    153
    Look, you're obviously better read than me, but I am having trouble understanding this. Pre insulin (ie 100 years ago) T1s were kept on starvation diets to try to delay DKAs, but they all still died.... Are you saying they'd have been OK if they just went keto?
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Hug Hug x 1
  4. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    10,219
    Likes Received:
    6,785
    Trophy Points:
    278
    I have been wondering about this in terms of T1 myself. Even being ultra strict keto or even carnivore will not negate the absolute need for gluconeogenesis. Insulin is needed for gng, no? So pre insulin a keto diet just delayed the inevitable, death by starvation at the cellular level.
     
  5. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    338
    Likes Received:
    263
    Trophy Points:
    83
    It depends on your c-peptide. Bernstein uses low doses of insulin with keto to keep the Hba1c low and to retain the islet cells you have left. I have 30% of my islet cells, calculated by my specialist using the HOMA formula. My c-peptide is below the cut off where one needs to use insulin. I'm not on insulin (yet) but it's really tough going.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  6. Rachox

    Rachox Other · Type 2 - well controlled. Moderator.
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,359
    Likes Received:
    10,179
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi folks, interesting as it is, can you please take your discussions about Type 1, keto and honeymooning etc... to a new thread, remembering that this is on a thread posted by a newbie type 2 who was asking about Metformin and glucose monitoring. Thanks.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  7. callieuk

    callieuk Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    73
    Going to throw my two penneth in re coming off Metformin ...

    I was diagnosed with an A1c of 61 - immediately they put me on Metformin, I had horrendous side effects and it ruined my stomach but I persevered as I had no intention of the diagnosis being more than a blip! A1c went down to a healthy level and I asked to come off Metformin, the nurse agreed as side effects (even the SR) were causing me other problems. I adjusted my diet to LCHF and everyone was happy. Next A1c it had risen again :( back onto medication (gliclazide) but I couldn't lose weight, so a change to tragenta was needed. I'm now 18 months in, just outside of remission, back to focussing on my eating patterns. My meter always reports over 10.0 no matter what I eat, but I know what to avoid now for spikes, cut out rice, potatoes and bread and it's finally dropping below 10 but it's stable, my variation throughout the day is less than 2 points.

    Without the meter my spikes were unknown and I had no idea what foods made my levels do. Even if you test for 3 months it's really worth it, small changes can reap big gains - I'm back losing weight and feeling much more energetic.

    My take is that if you don't want to take the medication (is let it do the work), then you have to do the work yourself and work out how to reverse the highs. I'm not sure that it's easier without a meter.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

    Messages:
    6,100
    Likes Received:
    3,982
    Trophy Points:
    198
    By using a blood glucose monitor I was able to verify that the low carb diet I did to control my weight also controlled my blood glucose, and at 50 gm of carbs from low cab foods I was in the normal range most of the time. Those 'healthy' foods which I had always protested made me gain weight were the very ones which caused spikes - whood have thunk it eh?
    I don't need to test now - I have been in the normal range for about two years - not losing weight at all easily, but getting thinner and stronger all the time.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. poemagraphic

    poemagraphic Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    516
    Likes Received:
    1,021
    Trophy Points:
    138
    This is GREAT advice!

    Po
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  10. poemagraphic

    poemagraphic Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    516
    Likes Received:
    1,021
    Trophy Points:
    138
    Doctors often say... You 'must' do this, You have to do/not do yarda yarda yarda Actually you do NOT 'have' to do anything!
    If you are unhappy with what 'any' doctor tells you, ultimately it is entirely up to you, the individual, to decide what you feel is right for you.
    A nurse at my doctors told me I 'had' to begin taking statins.... I told her Thanks, but no thanks.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    #50 poemagraphic, May 13, 2019 at 12:18 AM
    Last edited: May 13, 2019
  11. 1spuds

    1spuds Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    292
    Likes Received:
    335
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Thats been said over and over on this thread,and I agree.My Dr is not my master,he is my collaborator.He gives his opinions,I give mine and together we work out a plan that I ultimately must agree with and condone.Dr's are not the last word,I am.ITS MY LIFE,to him its a 10-15 minute visit.

    I do my own research on medical conditions and I know for a fact I know more about treating T2 diabetes than he does.

    Controlled my sugars with diet.He wanted me on metformin,I said no,try diet and exercise/wt loss first.Veterans hospital clinic Dr said "OMG,why didnt they start you on insulin,thats what we would have done" I replied diet and exercise and my numbers are ideal for a non diabetic.I dont think she heard a word I said.

    I did stop testing and what do you know,my number A1c was my worst ever a year after stopping.So yup,Im a firm believer in testing.Didnt realize I was so far out of whack,got lazy on eating right because I wasnt seeing I had lapsed on proper diet.

    Being well informed and IN CHARGE is always good advice IMO.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  12. Bogie

    Bogie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    96
    Likes Received:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    73
    The truth be told ...
    #1 There is no cure, so a short term on Metformin (or other med) is health management - not a permanent fix. Metformin, and some other Diabetic meds, do more than just lower your BG (example: may lower the risk of a CV event).
    #2 You will be a Diabetic for the rest of your life (this isn't a flu bug that will simply go away).
    #3 Learn to manage your blood glucose levels - self-monitor! Get a meter and supplies. If your doctor will not prescribe then bite the bullet and pay for it yourself. It is your life so take control, follow your doctor's advice for medication, commit to a low carb diet (it will become a habit after a while).
    #4 HbA1C is important. Self-testing helps you know what foods (diet, exercise, etc) affect your BG https://www.diabetes.org.uk/guide-to-diabetes/managing-your-diabetes/hba1c
    #4 Medication, diet, and lifestyle, are BG control and organ protection.
    #5 Attitude adjustment ... Diabetes is my super power :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  13. Keith_Simpson

    Keith_Simpson Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    23
    On the contrary, only moitoring the pattern are you able to see what works & what does not. The Hba1c blood test is just an indication of the average glucose level; it tells you nothing with regard to what works & what does not. They don't want you testing because that would create a demand for prescriptions which the NHS does not wish to fund.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook