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Got Fed Up And Fell Off The Wagon

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by nomorechoccy, Aug 6, 2018.

  1. nomorechoccy

    nomorechoccy · Active Member

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    MMM well 4 weeks into this and I have just done a 6 day week so decided to hell with being good. Went to the seaside by train few beers mixed grill and chips red wine and a kebab for supper ( no Chips).

    Back to salads again today.

    Can anyone tell me what effect one day doing this has. DOes it undo all thee good work of past 4 weeks.
     
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  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Hello and welcome to the forum. Tagging @daisy1 for the info pack offered to all newcomers.

    To answer your question first let me say don't beat yourself up over this 'wobble' because we've all been there. Making lifestyle changes isn't for the feint hearted and it takes time to come to grips with those changes.

    As to the harm you may have done, well, probably none considering that you have done well in the preceeding four weeks. So put this behind you and get back into the good habits that you are building on.

    Have a wander around the forum and ask as many questions as you like.
     
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  3. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    It's unlikely you will have undone all the good work of the past 4 weeks, but it is a bit like spending an age having an expensive pedicure with all the add-ons, then taking those lovely pampered tootsies out and dropping a hammer on your big toe. It won't kill you, but it might smart a bit for a day or two, and it'll take a bit of effort for the feet to look so great again.

    Your challenge is: Was your 6-day week an absolute one-off? If it was, think no more of it and get back on the horse. If 6-day weeks are part of your working routine, then your challenge is finding a way of managing them, within your chosen regime. Repeatedly dropping hammers on feet isn't a great idea, and can lead to longer lasting damage.

    Back on the horse.
     
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  4. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there, what makes you think it has to be 'back to the salads'?, no wonder you succumbed if you think it's salads all the way. Would you mind telling us what you have been eating specifically for the last 4 weeks?, I am convinced that you will be able to incorporate a mixed grill into your regime with no repercussions and probably some wine too. x
     
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  5. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Yes, nothing wrong with the grilled stuff and the wine within reason. Beer can have carbs in so keep it down where you can. I'm sure most of us have feast days; just don't have them too often. Your meter and weight will guide you
     
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  6. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    It might ding you up a bit for a day or two, (the beer and chips anyway, the mixed grill was probably fine or close to it), but that's about it. There's more to LCHF/Keto life than salads though, you know that, right? There's a lot I can't eat these days (rheumatism and migraine triggers as well as carbs), but there's still SO MUCH good food I can still dig into, I don't miss the other stuff much. In any case, if you enjoyed it, and it was a bit of a one-off, it was worth it.
     
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  7. Metabolism_Boss

    Metabolism_Boss Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Getting used to a restricted diet is hard. It is really important to find a variety of recipes that suit you, if you are going to be able to keep to a sensible eating regime long-term. I remember feeling like I didn't want to eat anything as I was so fed up with veggies. Now the majority of my diet is still green stuff, but I have a variety of foods to go wth them. I found breakfast the trickiest, but now I have fritatta, fish, low carb bread toast and the good old mixed grill. There are lots of really good recipes online and lots of good books for ideas.

    Well done for staying off the chips - they would have been my downfall.
     
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  8. Terrytiddy

    Terrytiddy Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @nomorechoccy welcome to the group.:) You probably fell off the horse because you have been living on salads. What type are you? What eating regime are you on? What meds? Do you monitor blood glucose ? What's your goals? Sorry for all the questions but it will help members get a better idea and thus offering you help, advice and support. Please answer only what you are comfortable with. :happy:
     
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  9. nomorechoccy

    nomorechoccy · Active Member

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    sorry guys I'm type 2. I was reluctant to take tablets so am trying to modify my diet. Eating lots of veg and some fruit.

    2 avocados a week fish twice a week albeit tinned in tomato sauce olives. No chocolate but that's ok snacking on cheese. I have an appointment with nurse in 2 weeks time hope she will do a blood test.no bread and a small amount of pasta luckily strawberries and cream are ok.

    I am not overweight have lost 3.5 stones in last few years still towards top of weight range but I do a physical job. Not normally 6 days a week.

    thanks for all the comments and advice.
     
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  10. jayney27

    jayney27 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome,
    you have already been given some helpful advice relating to your question so I don't really feel the need to add more, however, you might find the Diet Doctor website a good source for recipe ideas and there is a thread here on the forum that a group of us post into on a daily basis, we chat (or not) about our day but most importantly share our menu for the day, its a great place for getting inspiration
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/posts/1852602/ - have a look at a couple of days previous posts to et an idea of what some of us eat, you will be made welcome should you decide to join us here.
    There are lots of other threads of course that discuss diet and food choices, share recipes ect but this is the one that I follow.
     
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  11. rhubarb73

    rhubarb73 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Did you enjoy it? If you did then it has probably done you a bit of good as well. It certainly won't do any lasting damage.
    As others have said just get back on the wagon again, but focus on making it sustainable – which means make it less punishing. When people argue about diets and which is best they often focus on the mechanical side of it, but diets are won and lost in the brain. To be successful you need to avoid feeling hungry all the time. Low Carb is better for that (as well as being good for blood control) because the insulin response is lower, but you do still need to eat enough substance. Personally I’ve taken to eating walnuts and pecans as a snack to fill me up when I get peckish. Most nuts are good, and almonds were recommended to me but I find them a bit sharp and hurt my gums. Anyway – well done for asking here for help (shows commitment); don’t fret or beat yourself up. Press reset on the plan and go again.
     
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  12. Rustytypin

    Rustytypin Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    You don't mention @nomorechoccy if you are testing your blood sugar levels, if you did you would see the effect of your "binge". I find that if I "fall off the wagon" it can take a day or even three to get back to my normal levels. As others have said, it would be as well not to repeat too often!
     
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  13. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @nomorechoccy

    Hello Nomorechoccy and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will be able to help.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  14. Daphne917

    Daphne917 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    @nomorechoccy it’s not the end of the world. If you are a chocolate lover get some 70 to 85% dark chocolate and treat yourself to a square or two.
     
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  15. Addyb

    Addyb · Active Member

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    If I'm going to fall off the wagon it's chocolate that would be the cause. Any recommendations on choc I'd be ok to have the odd square or two of?
     
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  16. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    berries is a much better choice than fruits ... the fruit sugar is really bad for diabetes ... but most veggies and meats and olives and avocados and sour cream and full-fat yogurt are great .. sugar is of cause no-go and potatoes rice corn and bread are also not really good because it spikes blood glucose as much as sugar...
     
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    #16 Freema, Aug 6, 2018 at 8:04 PM
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  17. purplepenguin

    purplepenguin Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Addyb I have Sainsburys' 85% bars. They come in 5 bars in a pack, and I think each bar is about 4g, although I rarely have it all in one go. I quite like the chocologic ones too. The best though is Aldi 85% but they don't sell it anymore.
     
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  18. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Mixed grill, red wine and kebab are very low carb, if not virtually no carb. So the only thing not fitting in a low carb diet were the beers :)
    Keep it up!
     
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  19. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Lindt Excellence 85% has 19g carbs per 100g bar and 8 squares per bar so 2.4g per square. Lindt 90% has less carbs but is much more bitter.
     
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  20. Addyb

    Addyb · Active Member

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    We shop at Sainsbury's so I'll take a look thanks.
     
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