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Have you been told not to test your blood sugars?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by desidiabulum, Oct 30, 2014.

  1. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    Just read around on the web. All the answers are there. Why are you asking? The answers are way too complicated
     
    #821 Mike D, Sep 24, 2017 at 11:55 AM
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2017
  2. Anthony1738

    Anthony1738 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Contralto
    To keep this answer on thread, yes I was told to test and how to test and when to test and to keep records and report back with my records on each visit, and boy I am I happy that I was given this information!

    When I was first diagnosed some 4 months ago my doctor went to great lengths to explain to me how diabetes works and the reason why I developed it. Theres a result sheet attached which he used to explain to me in no uncertain terms that my beer consumption caused my triglyceride levels to rise to such a level that my pancreas was carrying too much fat to work effectively, he then referred me to a diabetic specialist, a lady doctor who sent me for further tests, which confirmed me as a type 2, and also confirmed that I was carrying too much fat on my liver and pancreas although my bmi was normal. She prescribed me a bagfull of drugs, 5 pills per day, 3 for diabetes, 1 statin and 1 blood pressure which was too high also. She exlained about the possibility of getting Hypoglycemia and its effects, and told me to stop the medication and come back to see her. I started getting Hypos about three weeks in to taking the medication on a daily basis in the evening just before I ate dinner, so I did as she said and stopped the medication and went back to the hospital.

    I saw a different doctor, (fortunately for me) who sent me for further tests, the tests came back within the hour and was amazed to see that my BG level had dropped to 130 from 269 so the new doc took me off all meds apart from 500 mg Metformin per day. And told me that the reason for the big drop was my new diet (Low Carb) and the reduction of beer consumption and increase in excersise had caused the removal of the fat on my essential internal organs and my insulin production was almost normal but still a slight resistance was noticeable. I was advised to keep records of what I ate and he resulting BG readings. He went on to encourage me to continue with my diet and excersise regime, I also introduced Intermittant Fasting for 18 hours Monday and Thursday, and still do.

    My third visit to hospital and retesting in September revealed all my levels were normal and he took me off all meds, to date I am still recording normal levels, both FSB and post prandial, I have started experimenting eating different foods and adding carbs to my diet, such as potatoes, white Rice and Bread in small quantities at first and I have yet to see a BG spike higher than recommended levels published on this website, of before meal 126 and 2 hours after 140. My doctor also told me that he wasnt interested in my FSB but more interested in my readings after eating and what I ate.

    I dont consider myself a winner, but I do believe that I am lucky to have the right doctor, had I remained with the first lady doctor I am sure my outcome would have been very different.
    View attachment 24034
    img001.jpg img002.jpg
     
    • Like Like x 1
    #822 Anthony1738, Oct 2, 2017 at 2:26 AM
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
  3. cocobee.2017

    cocobee.2017 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes I have been told by a so called hcp that I should not test. I am prediabetic with a strong family history of T2. She said it was obsessive, unnecessary & inaccurate compared to the three monthly hba1c. They must all be instructed to say the same thing. And why I ask? It's all about the money I'm sure.
     
  4. Kingmob

    Kingmob Type 2 · Active Member

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    Asked about testing shortly after diagnosis, was told not to and for T2 that only necessary if taking medication that requires it. No further explanation.

    Attended desmond course, group was asked if anyone tested, myself and one other attendee say yes. Was asked where I got meter, said I purchased myself, was grilled about who trained me to use it and the next 10 minutes spent explaining to other attendees that testing wasn't necessary and causes anxiety.

    Was totally surprised when shortly afterwords everyone given blood results from time of diagnosis (most people at least 2 months), some showing high hba1c (>100) and a scale with 80 showing as deep red at the end of the scale. No mention of how current value may be lower due to medication/diet or advice on retesting.
     
  5. Grateful

    Grateful Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    "Have you been told not to test your blood sugars?" Well, in my case, it never occurred to me, was not even mentioned by my doctor, and even after being a member of this forum for a few weeks now and finding out a lot about self-testing, it seems to make little sense in my case.

    The overwhelming evidence since my diagnosis is that my T2 has been fully controlled solely with diet and exercise. The only testing has been in-clinic HbA1c every two to four months, and that will probably be stretched to six months eventually.

    I do understand that by frequent self-testing I could figure out which foods (or activities) spike my glucose levels. But (in my particular case) I fail to see the benefit, as long as the overall/average result over a period of several months shows that the T2 is fully controlled.

    Having said that, we are all different and I completely understand (1) that for many people, frequent self-testing is a medical necessity and (2) that, also, some people just want more information so that they can be assured that they are doing the right thing, on a daily or even hourly basis. I'm also grateful for all the advice here since, if things worsen, self-testing could be in my future in any case.

    Edited to add: I have not read all 42 pages of this thread, but it does sound like some doctors are inappropriately trying to discourage self-testing even when it seems medically essential!
     
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  6. Roywfield1

    Roywfield1 Type 2 · Newbie

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    I was also told not to test by my nurse
     
  7. seadragon

    seadragon Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Your link just shows how they can skew the results they want by organising a meaningless test. They all tested just once a day and so that told them nothing at all of any use. The idea of testing is to test the foods that affect your BG therefore is only of use when people know when to test and how to interpret the results otherwise of course it is both meaningless and stressful.

    Teach people to test before and after meals to see which foods spike them and therefore gives them the tools to use and how to use the information and of course as many here will testify, it can transform your life and put you in control of your condition.

    I wasn't given a meter nor test strips but after seeing it advised on here I would say it's the best thing I ever did. Doc would have had me on metformin and statins and on the downward spiral to insulin but instead I am feeling fitter and healthier than I did twenty years ago.

    They are right it is pointless giving meters and strips and restricting to once a day but teach people to keep a food diary and tat before and after meals for a few months and you'd have far less diabetics on that downward slope.
     
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  8. Davie_sett

    Davie_sett Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I do have a bad habit of testing to often i sometimes do about 10 tests a day i just hate it when my blood sugars to high
     
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  9. Footrest

    Footrest Type 2 · Member

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    I too was advised by both nurses and docs not to test. Although I now have a meter I don’t necessarily disagree with them as one can become fixated on the meter and end up living by it when really a good diet and active lifestyle is most likely the best one can do to keep t2d under control.
    I only test myself a few times a week at fixed times right now- that may change over time.
     
  10. Boo1979

    Boo1979 Other · Well-Known Member

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    I get strips on prescription due to being on Gliclizide
    At one point the surgery stopped the prescription and when I queried it I was told by the practice manager that T2 donkt need to test because all it does is make people anxious. I drew the Gps attention to the Nice guidance re prescribing strips for people on sulfonylureas and the requirement for us tobe testing BS prior to driving and my prescription was reinstated. I periodically end up going through the same process again but what Ive noticed is that its usually toward the end of the financial year and a pointed letter to one of the practce partner GPs soon sorts it out
     
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  11. 123657

    123657 · Active Member

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    i think you should test your sugars weekly every year its up to you to do this or get someone to help you to test your sugar levels if you are not well enough to do it help and support to any casualty is very important
     
  12. Motherhen2014

    Motherhen2014 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Please help someone I cannot remember their I'd but they have me a site for a tester and strips at a good price but I can't find it now.The were called Yes something I want to purchase one.Can they please send it to me again please.
     
  13. shelley262

    shelley262 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product-category/shop/caresens-n/
    Not me you are referring to ! but I can suggest an excellent site they do free meters including dual meters with ketone testers it’s a care sens meter with 3 different models on offer for free and also free lancing pens the strips for their tee 2 meter are 7.75 for 50 and for the dual meter which I have are 9.95 for 50. They also do free lancet pens you just need to pay for lancets which work out about 4 quid for a pack and they deliver quite quickly. Amazon do a code free meter for about 14 with strips at a similar price to the tee2 hope this helps you
     
  14. Lucia-212

    Lucia-212 Type 2 · Newbie

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    I have been told I can’t test but have been told to alway assume that my blood glucose is high
    Type 2
     
  15. Motherhen2014

    Motherhen2014 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you so much it was the Tee2 I wanted won't get the one with Keytones as I don't understand them.But thank you for your help.It is all ordered now thank you.x
     
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  16. Motherhen2014

    Motherhen2014 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am now testing my glucose with my own tester and strips.My doctor told me I don't need to test and stopped prescribing tester strips and needles.I have always worried if my glucose is raised or not.But I received my tester and strips this morning no heavy breakfast, but my reading before lunch at 2.30 was 12.1 I had breakfast at 8.40 only toast. After lunch my reading after two hours was 13.3.I had a light tea and two hours afterwards my reading was 10.3.I have nothing more to eat but it has taken till 11.45 to go down to 9.3 and my doctor says I don't need to test.
     
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  17. Daphne917

    Daphne917 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Out of interest who has told you you cannot test? Unfortunately many T2 are told by their Diabetic nurses and/or doctors that there is no need to test but testing is one of the best ways that we have of ascertaining how different foods affect our BS.
     
  18. tomduck

    tomduck · Newbie

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    Yup I have been told that by my GP. She said it was a waste of time.
     
  19. cdpm

    cdpm Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    when i was first diagnosed i was told 3x a week (insurance covered that many)
    and when i couldn't afford any at $1 a strip -- knowing i would
    need to test more-- i asked at a clinic and they told me that
    they would give me a free sample of 10 strips then were going
    to "wean" me back to 3x a week
    but now with insulin i get alot more covered
    but that says that without insulin they think people barely
    need to test but i got hypos on a med that is said not to
    cause hypos (metformin) and another med they told me wouldnt
    cause hypos-- gliclazide ( i cant remember how its spelled)
    and during this i still wasnt told to test or any info.
    on how to or when
    i had to learn for myself
     
  20. fairy108_

    fairy108_ Type 2 · Member

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    Hi I know how you feel ,I have had to buy a meter and all that goes with !my point is how are you going to know what affects you food wise .Its beyond belief I was diagnosed with typpe2 in November saw nurse and she said see you in 6 months ,well what help is that rea
     
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