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Hello, My name is "Estragon" and I'm a Diabetic....

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by Estragon, Oct 3, 2019.

  1. Estragon

    Estragon · Well-Known Member

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    Re-reading the AA Prayer.

    Having collected some 140 GLUCO DATA points; noted next to those DATA points what I’ve eaten at what point in the day; the reason why I collected at that point - wobbly, bad reading, etc etc; reading both here and other places I’ve started to really appreciate just how complex and reactive the endocrine system works the Glucose mechanisms.

    Here is my understanding: A non-diabetic person has a fully working, auto-adjusting Endocrine system whereby all the levers work almost seamlessly. A Diabetic, me, doesn’t have this fully working auto-adjusting Endocrine system. Diet and medication, Metformin for me, are the ways I can take back control of the fluctuations. But only the fluctuations, and I will never get back my fully working auto-adjusting Endocrine system. Diet and, maybe not so much in the future, my medication, could take the fluctuations to less.

    If I’m incorrect in my observations/conclusions please put me right.

    Now some humour: I’ve been bouncing around a decreasing fluctuation of around 10%. And an overall reduction of around 10 points (I’ll attach a graph later), 18 > 8 in almost one month. So, Yesterday I’d bounced around 9.7 > 9.4 and then took a sample which zoomed up to 12.9!?!? Wahhhhh..... Panic, depression and the whole nine yards. I hot-footed myself down to my truly helpful Pharmacist, who advised me to go home, wash my hands and fingers thoroughly and retest..... Got home retested and immediately got a reading of 9.4 and then three hours later 6.7. Taking back control.....

    So that’s how I am. I fluctuate between sad-realisation and content-acceptance and the wisdom to know the difference.
     
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  2. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I was watching a TV program about electric cars and reflecting that type twos are rather like someone who's been putting diesel into their petrol driven vehicle and suddenly finding that all the time they had a hybrid that goes like the wind when the battery is charged.
    Odd what thoughts arise in the wee small hours.
     
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  3. Annie_Clark1973

    Annie_Clark1973 · Newbie

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    Hi. I’m Annie, I know exactly how you feel about not saying about the diabetes. I am also newly diagnosed and so scared. I was in tears when my GP told me. Hopefully people can pull together on here and help each other through.

    Best of luck to you,

    Annie x
     
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  4. coby

    coby Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This is the first time that I've returned on here since posting that to you JoKalsbeek. I am just so low most of the time, and still cannot comprehend the magnitude of what happened. I agree that I need to try harder .. insomuch as I throw myself into projects to fill my time .. hence less thinking time, but still cannot get myself back on track with the eating. Do you have any ideas that could help? I wish there were another member with the same struggle who could really 'get' where I'm at with this. Thank you for your response though, and I entirely agree with the guys who say how kind you are :) xx
     
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  5. Estragon

    Estragon · Well-Known Member

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    Hello Good People! Just over 2 weeks since my last post here. Been reading the Forums and learning more. Learnt what I may eat and sticking to the plan. I'm sleeping very badly. I wake up at 2am and that's it . . . I'm awake. I've been trakking my Gluc through all this taking 214 Blood/Gluc Data Points. I've had some sucess and some extraordinary failures.

    Heres the evidence-based numbers:

    Latest Gluc.jpg

    Seeing that latest UPSWING has given me pause. Insomnia? . . . . Anyway, it's depressing.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    Lack of sleep can certainly cause a rise.
     
  7. Estragon

    Estragon · Well-Known Member

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    Ugh.... Early this morning 9.3. Have my usual porridge and Metformin. I go for a walk to my Pharmacist, to pick up my new stash of Test Strips and Lancets retested 12.0 ! Eh? Reretested on different finger 12.7 ....

    Question: Does a short sharp walk push up the Gluc reading?
     
  8. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    ....That'd be the porridge.
     
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  9. Estragon

    Estragon · Well-Known Member

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    And the other mornings, where I’d had porridge, and didn’t go to 12? But now, 2 hours later, I’m 8.7. However, I take your advice on Porridge=Carbs, understood.
     
  10. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    I just read your two posts. I am so very sorry to learn of your loss. There are , sadly, several others here who have lost loved ones. Is there a forum here for grief support I wonder? Hugs.
     
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  11. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Okay, granted, it's not just the porridge, it's also dawn phenomenon. Your liver dumping glucose in the morning to get you started for the day. (And for most people, insulin reistance is more prevalent in the morning. Could be porridge wouldn't give the same rise in the afternoon, for instance). I know my bloodsugars are higher on a morning where I had a bad night's sleep, than when I slept like a baby. The liver sometimes just keeps dumping glucose until you eat. Wake at 3 a.m. and the dump starts earlier. And it's not an exact science.... A meal will not give the exact same rise every time. Because it's not just the meal. It's also activity, stress, sleep, health, and a bunch of other things I'm probably leaving out. I oversimplified things, and I'm sorry. :(
     
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  12. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Moderator
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    I agree with JoKalsbeek the porridge wouldn't have helped. However, yes stress, lack of sleep, exercise and the dawn phenomena also contribute too your levels. So your walk may have increased the levels. I'm finding stress recently really pushes up my levels. Luckily(?) when I've been really stressed recently I haven't been able to eat so my carbs are at an all time low.

    It would be easier if it was an exact science and we all reacted the same- then I think all of the medical profession would come on board the LCHF train. However, our bodies are so complex that it doesn't work like that. That is the big benefit of a meter

    For me the thing I am trying to learn is to not be too disappointed when my levels rise due to stress. Because I've gone so low carb my usual levels are in the ,low 5s or even the 4s. Recently withatres they are in the high 5s and 6s. I've even had a couple of 7s. While that isn't great my being low carb has bought me some give when I get stressed. If I hadn't been so low c arb the stress would have pushed it even higher.

    Anyway we are all learning and just doing what we can to get our levels down and get them to stay down. You need to find a way to lower your levels that you can live with. I really find it hard to realise this is for the rest of my life- some days I don't handle it that well.

    Just think also how far you've come in a really short time- how much you've learned. You've come a long way! :)
     
  13. Estragon

    Estragon · Well-Known Member

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    No worries - no harm done. Another variable you may have not accounted for, is that I read you've done your Stewrling Work without Meds? Correct? Whilst I'm on 2gms of Metformin each day. I'm supposing that this would also, beneficially skew my numbers.

    Indeed - This and along with your helpful and hopeful detailed Numbers "Must give me pause .. . .".
     
  14. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    A bit, yeah... But it's mainly the meals that up or lower your bloodsugars, the metformin won't do much about those. Any progress you're making, you're making with just a bit of help from the met, and in time you could probably ditch it altogether, if you want to. I started out on metformin, like just about everyone, (there's exceptions to the rule, of course), but it didn't agree with me at all. Then I low carbed with gliclazide, and didn't know why I was having hypo's. I'm just glad to be off all meds now.... Have been for 3 years. But when I was diagnosed my post prandial numbers could hit 18 or 22, more often than not. It was a lot to come back from, and it did take some time. It's not a race, it's a marathon. But anything's possible if you set your mind to it. ;)
     
  15. Estragon

    Estragon · Well-Known Member

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    I’ve now got bags of questions.

    So, what does Met do to affect an outcome. I ask ‘cos my GP has doubled my Met. She must have a reason? Also she hadn’t even spoke about going low-carb. Why?

    Ah! I read your “No Meds” and thought wow, she’s done all this by only de-carbing!

    Gotcha! Thanks for the clarity.

    Well, Mr Pedantic here, a Marathon is also a race ;) . Maybe you meant “It’s not a Sprint, it’s a Marathon”. And as I’m hoping the Hb1ac are presently be nibbled away at by taking your De-Carbing approach, assisted by the Met.

    And being here amongst Survivors (...is that too strong a term?) gives me direction, support and confidence. And, just like the Marathon runners who grab water bottles from the Refreshment Stations along their way, Diabetes UK is my own, personal Refreshment Station, of course a No-Carb station.

    Great feedback JoKalsbeek, thanks for taking the time.

    E :)
     
  16. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Oooh, you had to point that out, didn't you? I'm Dutch, and I wrote it while on painkillers (migraine), so I was glad just to be coherent. Yes, sprint, sorry. (I'm going to be kicking myself the rest of the week now.)

    As for going being med-free all the way, I wish I had gone. I was diagnosed while my GP was on holiday, so I got the perscription for the met from a doc whom I'd never even met. He just phoned it in (or rather, mailed the pharmacy), and I started on the pills the same day, sight unseen. It was horrible. After three, four weeks or something like that, dehydrated and bleeding, I was finally seen by the nurse, who told me to stop immediately because I was probably a T1. (Uh, no... The violent reaction to metformin is a common side effect, not an indication of a wrong type diagnosis. But whatever. She was nice, but clueless). So the same doc who never met me switched me to gliclazide. In the meantime I had been so miserable on metformin I'd started rading up about alternatives... Only to find out metformin doesn't do anything about what you eat (it supresses appitite, and that's basically it, foodwise), but it keeps your liver from dumping glucose, up to about 75% less. So while it tackled the liverdump in the morning some (Dawn Phenomenon), it wasn't doing anything elsewhere anyway! I also read a whole lot about low carb... Some of it was bull, like having to avoid red meat and fat and whatever, and some of it was gold. So I just tried all sorts of things and checked with my meter what rang true and what didn't. If I'd logged on here sooner, I would've read Dr. Jason Fung a lot earlier in my journey. But all in all it was a few weeks before I properly started low carbing. And after 3 months my GP took me off the gliclazide, because I didn't need it. (And according to my results, and hypo's, hadn't needed it for about a month and a half).

    As for docs not bringing it up, I'm the only person in my GP's practice who went low carb. And has remained in the normal range ever since. no-one else ever tried it. I got rid of my non alcoholic fatty liver disease -impossible according to the endo- and my cholesterol is down. But why am I the only one in the practice? Because all newly diagnosed people are sent to the same dieticians I saw. But, again, everyone was on holiday when I was diagnosed, so by the time I was finally seen after about a month and a half, I'd figured things out by myself. And what I was told, was basically the same thing when I first saw them because I was obese. Eat more carbs, cut the fats. Exactly the opposite of what the books AND my meter were telling me. (That, and I took their advice 8 years or so earlier... I went from obese to morbidly obese and diabetic following their "healthy" diet!) So since I wasn't following their advice and having stellar results because of it, I didn't have to return. Such an obstinate patient. ;) My GP nixed the nurse, so we just do it together now. I'm her guinea pig, basically... I ask for whatever test I want, and we check how I'm doing... but I've been in the normal range fir over 3 years now. For a while she thought I might have developed an eating disorder, but when I started telling her about a 3-egg, bacon and cheese breakfast she believed me, that I was eating proper, nutricious meals, just non-carby ones.

    Most of us don't hit the ground running. We don't know, because I dunno about you, but in school I got the dutch equivalent of the EatWell plate hammered into me. The same ones doctors learn about, still. The low carb movement is quite present here, but it's only catching on slowly in the medical establishment. Still.... Can't exactly blame them, a GP has to know about every condition, it's a lot to keep up with. Still miffed at the endo, the diabetes nurse and the "diabetes-specialised" dieticians though.... But there you go.

    If the lack of medical endorsement troubles you, you don't have to listen to a forum comprised of non-medial personell and basically, strangers. Just listen to your meter. If low carb works for you, you'll find out with just a finger prick. It'll also tell you if it's a bust. :)
     
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  17. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Moderator
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    I have to say I also wasn't given the loch advice by a doctor. I went too my doctor for. non-related matter and she insisted on doing blood tests for glucose- I resisted but she insisted (and walked me to the person who takes bloods). That was a Friday. On Monday I got a call that I needed to come back to the doctor. So I pretty much knew what the diagnosis I Ould be getting. Both my parents were type 2 and 3 of my siblings as well So I started googling as did my husband. I ended up here he ended up at Diabetes Australia. so we had very different expectations. When I went to the doctor she gave me the usually EatWell type advice and my husband thought she was right and thought I was being a bit overdramatic with the "I'll never be able to eat carbs again'. Well we tried a 'healthy' meal and my levels spiked. We then followed the LCHF advice and my levels. are down. The results spoke for themselves. My amazing husband is now onboard and has vastly reduced his carbs too although he certainly doesn't need to lose weight. He is a scientific type (as am I ) and was v very sceptical and read a lot about LCHF and the studies but he agrees that's what is working for me. The doctor was surprised by my first review of HbA1c but to my disappointment didn't really want to know. I hope over time she will. If I hadn't found this site my diabetes would have progressed just like expected.

    I love this site
     
  18. Estragon

    Estragon · Well-Known Member

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    OK, Chums, a Challenge: Please suggest a bang-up Christmas meal for just the two of us. We’re both T2.
     
  19. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

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    Prime rib roast, cauliflower cheese,
    Brussel sprouts sautéed with bacon and butter and, a mixed green salad.
     
  20. Estragon

    Estragon · Well-Known Member

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    Wow!! That was fast. Any ideas for desserts?
     
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