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Help and advice needed

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Eddina, Mar 25, 2019.

  1. Eddina

    Eddina Type 2 · Newbie

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    im an older lady advised in December 18 after blood test in February that I needed to take meds for type 2. Appointment given 6 weeks later where I had bloods done feet check. No eye test had been booked and asked for dietary advice but got nothing. Feeling upset and don't know what to do. A hospital doctor was concerned over my latest blood test but felt fobbed off by surgery doctors. Want some help on diet more then anything and do like potatoes on times. Don't drink or smoke but upset over all this. Nurse mentioned course but found out last week it was never booked and not advised about blood testing either. Please help and point me in right direction.
     
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  2. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Hello and welcome to the forum, @Eddina !
    I'll tag @daisy1 for you to give you a solid start, other members will be along to give you a hand with finding a way to manage this :)
    Type 2's don't usually get a meter but there's a lot of reasons to buy one yourself. It means you won't be working in the dark. For instance, you can use it to find out how many potatoes you can eat without getting your blood glucose too high.
    Good luck!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    #2 Antje77, Mar 25, 2019 at 4:47 PM
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2019
  3. Energize

    Energize Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Eddina
    Welcome to the forum. Yes, I, amongst many, appreciate how you must be feeling. Unfortunately, Health Professionals just don't often give appropriate advice, let alone support. However, you'll learn a lot on here, if you're wanting to learn about Diabetes etc, which should help you lots.

    @Antje77 has tagged Daisy1 for you. You'll soon see a post giving lots of information on how to help you understand about Diabetes type 2

    It's usual for the GP/Nurse not to give out a Glucometer to Type 2s - likely because they cost the NHS money, plus the ongoing cost of the test strips. There are two glucometers that are recommended on here for the more reasonable cost of the test strips. I can't remember enough to quote them but it's certainly important to consider the cost of the test strips when deciding which meter to buy.

    As Antje has already mentioned, a meter will help you see what foods affect your blood sugar, giving you an idea of what to reduce/omit etc. Basically, carbohydrates will affect your blood sugar levels so many of us on here choose to reduce eating carbs, particularly potatoes, bread, rice, pasta, pastry, grains etc in addition to the more obvious, ie cakes, biscuits. To combat feeling hungry, we tend to eat more fats which, in fact, don't seem to be as 'evil' as thought many years ago ;)

    Wishing you the best of luck. This forum is great and can offer lots of advice and support :)
     
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  4. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    And don't forget fruit! Many of us have thought to eat more fruit when first diagnosed and bewildered about what to eat. Most fruits are full of sugar, diabetes doesn't care if it's 'natural' or refined sugar.
     
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  5. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Eddina, no worries, it's best to get advice from persons with similar conditions. You may not have thought too much about what you would like e.g. ok management, great management or possible reversal. If this is the latter 2 than i'm afraid potatoes are one of the worst foods a Type 2 could have; a large baked potato for example has 19 teaspoons of sugar (when digested and converted to glucose).

    Some things that do work are all meats, fish and shell fish. Vegetables such as courgettes, broccoli, asparagus, cauliflower, French green beans, celeriac - most above ground vegetables. So basically meat and 2 plus low sugar vegetables. Drinks such as all teas, coffees, water, sparkling water. If you like cheese, cream and plain yogurt your good to go on these (but once you have stabilised, if you want additional weight loss, this should be limited). Raspberries, strawberries are great. Macadamia, brazil, pecan, almond and walnuts go well with yogurt and berries.

    All of the stuff on the main page here http://www.burnfatnotsugar.com/ (except the first 3 tubers).
     
  6. LindsayJane

    LindsayJane Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello @Eddina and welcome to the forum. You will find lots of useful info on here, as have I - you and I are similar in as much as we are both older ladies and diagnosed about the same time (me, December 2018), but I am fortunate because my health care team are really supportive. When you get it, read the post from @daisy1 as it's really useful for us newbies - and get yourself a blood glucose monitor. It will be by far the most useful thing you own and, if you also keep a food diary, it will allow you to keep a check on what has a detrimental effect on your blood sugars. Have a good plough through the posts on here and get yourself familiar with some of the names - there are some really knowledgeable folk on here and they are always willing to help and give advice. I am beginning to get my blood sugars under control by cutting out unnecessary carbs (bread, spuds, pasta, rice) and replacing them with low carb vegetables. I hope you can do the same. Good luck with your journey and keep going with the forum to keep us posted of your progress!
     
  7. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi Eddina and welcome to the forum. A lot of what you need to know has been covered and daisy1’s post will help too.

    In case you go ahead with getting a meter here’s some info, and to be clear I have no commercial connections with any of the companies mentioned. For a meter with cheap strips go for the Tee2 + found here:

    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product/tee2-plus-blood-glucose-meter/ with the strips found here:

    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product/tee2-testing-strips/


    With more expensive strips is the Caresens Dual which I currently use, this one has the advantage of glucose and ketone testing in one machine, it’s to be found here:

    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product/caresens-dual-blood-glucose-and-ketone-meter/

    With the strips here:

    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product/caresens-pro-blood-glucose-test-strips/


    And to be totally transparent I used to use the SD Code Free which has the cheapest strips available. However I found itto be becoming less and less reliable. Here it is for anyone wanting to give it a go:

    http://homehealth-uk.com/product-category/blood-glucose/blood-glucose-monitor/

    and here for the extra strips

    http://homehealth-uk.com/all-products/sd-codefree-test-strips-to-be-used-only-with-the-sd-monitor/

    There are discount codes if you buy in bulk.

    5 packs 264086

    10 packs 975833


    Don’t forget to check the box that you have diabetes so you can buy VAT free. (for all meters and strips)
     
  8. Eddina

    Eddina Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thank you all for your support with this. It is very much appreciated. I have learnt more in the last few hours then three months since diagnosis. I will have to buy more vegetables which I enjoy. Like to just ask what about additives such as sauces and gravy
    Have they tombe limited also once again thank you
     
  9. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Hi @Eddina , and welcome to the forum.

    You're right to ask about additives to sauces and gravies. for a T2, managing their condition by diet, it usually makes sense to rein them back a bit. However, once you have a meter you'll be able to see for yourself how you handle them, and that'll be invaluable.

    Just one point; you mention a hospital Doc being a bit concerned about your blood result? Andre you waiting for any sort of operation, or hoping to go onto a surgical waiting list? The only reason I ask is there are strict parameters for allowing elective surgery with elevated blood glucose, so if an op is planned for the future, it'll be very advantageous to get a grasp on your condition sooner, rather than later.

    So often people find their ops cancelled, or delayed for this reason.

    Apologies if I'm barking up the writing tree of course.
     
  10. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Hello Eddina.
    I shouldn't worry too much about the 'education' course - not if it was like the one I was sent on - by the time I was assigned a place I had pretty much solved the situation, and knew that most of what was being told to us was worse than useless, it was downright dangerous.
    In its simplest form, type two diabetes is an inability to cope with carbohydrate, that is starches and sugars.
    If you reduce the amount of heavy carb foods you eat down to what your metabolism can cope with then you should soon start to see results in the normal range.
     
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  11. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @Eddina
    Hello Eddina and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it both interesting and helpful.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 147,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  12. Roseanne01

    Roseanne01 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  13. LindsayJane

    LindsayJane Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello @Roseanne01. Guidelines here are ( I believe ) that they should be made available to us but there is some resistance, probably due to cost. When I went for my 'training day', where I learned just about nothing, we were all told not to bother testing because it was inaccurate, misleading and a waste of time. I raised the point that it helped me keep a track on what foods did/did not spike my blood sugars and therefore helped me manage my diabetes. The response was, 'Oh well, if it works for you...' I think we have a long way to go yet!
     
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  14. Roseanne01

    Roseanne01 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Money money money.
     
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  15. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Just for your info here are the NICE Guidelines on self monitoring for Type 2s.
    https://pathways.nice.org.uk/pathwa...w-node:nodes-self-monitoring-of-blood-glucose
    Those of us on diet or diet and Metformin don’t get a look in I’m afraid :(
     
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