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Hi all

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Peter1702, Jul 20, 2019.

  1. Peter1702

    Peter1702 · Member

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    I have been recently diagnosed Type 1 at the age of 53. I find that I could do with lots of advice as my local NHS is not helping. I am needle phobic which is creating me loads of problems as I cannot check my blood sugar levels or inject insulin (my wife is injecting this for me). Any advice on beating this?
     
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  2. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi Peter,

    I was 54 at diagnosis but have no experience of the needle issue.

    A quick look on-line shows various resources are available so suggest a google search for information.

    Here's some info that might be helpful to get you going.

    https://www.guysandstthomas.nhs.uk/resources/patient-information/all-patients/overcoming-your-fear-of-needles.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjV2Mj6rMPjAhXTasAKHbAqDygQFjABegQIDxAG&usg=AOvVaw3KKLezgf2vgFplaGjO4WKO&cshid=1563620753015

    You could also try to push the issue with the diabetes nurse at your GP's clinic as they should be able to direct you somewhere for additional help.

    For daily checks there are devices like Freestyle Libre which you wear and although a small filament passes through the skin, it relieves the need for constant finger pricking.

    Good luck, hope you get something sorted.
     
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  3. Peter1702

    Peter1702 · Member

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    Hi Urban racer
    Have read the link you gave thanks for that.
    I find that my local nhs trust is not interested.
    I have tried hypnotherapy with no luck.
     
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  4. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome. I'm sorry to hear you're having a bad time of it. I've struggled to come to terms with the same diagnosis. I'm relatively needle-phobic myself and had very good diabetes nurses show me how to inject into a rubber ball before trying my stomach. I've ended up with hypersensitivity, which means everything hurts when the needles shouldn't, my GP says is stress from just starting insulin. Do you have a diabetes nurse you can phone and go in for training? I can phone up and have as many appointments as need with mine. I focus on the movement of flicking my wrist rather than the injection. For finger pricks, I use the middle and top of my fingers. It's so important to monitor your blood sugars. I test over 8 times a day, even getting up during the night. Best wishes for your journey ahead.
     
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  5. Peter1702

    Peter1702 · Member

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    I feel every injection for hours after. My GP is currently on holiday and the locum that is there is not interested. My diabetes nurse responds if I leave a message on answer phone but doesn’t give me any help. I have only been struggling with diabetes since beginning of July and have had enough already.
     
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  6. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. Can I ask what needle size you are using and where you are injecting? I guess I'm lucky as I rarely have any needle pain following the injection. Note that the area you inject in becomes less sensitive over time.
     
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  7. Peter1702

    Peter1702 · Member

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    I am using a 4mm pen fine needle and I am injecting in my thighs
     
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  8. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm the same. My GP said it was just the shock of it all making my skin hypersensitive. Even my fingerpricks hurt when they didn't before. I'm relying on it passing. I'm sorry to hear your nurse isn't helpful. You must feel isolated.
     
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  9. Peter1702

    Peter1702 · Member

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    I feel very isolated the only person who cares about me is my wife. I can’t take any more needles I’m too stressed.
     
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  10. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    #10 Marie 2, Jul 21, 2019 at 8:47 AM
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2019
  11. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Also @Prem51 has a needle phobia I'm pretty sure? So he might be able to help.

    I think this tags him since I mentioned his name??? Is that right @urbanracer?

    And here is a link to look at a tickleflex

    https://www.tickleflex.com/
     
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  12. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    @Marie 2 Yes that works. But I'm afraid I can't help @Peter1702. I fortunately do not have to inject. It was the fear of having to inject at some point that motivated me to control my diabetes by losing the fat that was almost entirely around my middle.

    I have read on other threads that some Type 1s say that injecting isn't as bad as they feared. I think they have said it's easier to scrunch up some belly skin and fat and inject into that. @Peter1702 might try that instead of injecting into his thighs.
     
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  13. hyponilla

    hyponilla Type 1 · Member

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    Hi Peter, when I was diagnosed six months ago I had severe needle phobia. It was to the point where I couldn't look at a blood test without feeling like I would pass out and when they sent me home from the hospital with the insulin pens I was terrified. Now it doesn't bother me the slightest. I just started injecting because I had no choice, and though the first week was terrible I got over it. You can practice sticking needles into fruit.

    It shouldn't be painful either. As mentioned above try injecting into your belly rather than thigh. Many people don't have enough fat in this area so you can hit nerves which will hurt. Studies also show that insulin absorption is better in the abdomen. Pinching the fat and injecting at 45 degrees is a lot easier than going straight in at 90 degrees when you struggle with needles.

    Another thing that's important is that the injections need to be fast, it should be like throwing a dart. In the beginning I would hesitate a lot and put the needle in slowly and this hurt. There's a very good section in Dr Bernstein's book on how to inject insulin. I split my basal these days so I never inject more than 6u at the time, but I remember trying to do the full 12u when I started on insulin and these injections were always messy it would sting and bruise. There's something called the law of small numbers (also in Dr Bernstein's book) which makes sense to me.

    You can do this. And you're not alone. There's many good people online writing blogs and posting on forums. I hope things get better for you.
     
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  14. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    I only have experience of injecting myself with anticoagulation injections post op, not insulin. However I have seen talk of this devise which means the only piercing of the skin is once every three days. I don’t know if this would be better for you @Peter1702 ?
    https://mmc.medtronic-diabetes.co.uk/iport/
     
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  15. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, @Peter1702 , I'll tag @Delticmatt100 , he was dx'd recently, was having injection issues too and managed to get hold of some needle shields which cover the needles, seems to have helped him, so maybe worth looking into.

    You are so not alone in this. There's lots of folks on this forum with decades worth of experience. T1 has been called "the ultimate self-treated condition", so we can always pitch in with suggestions when needed.

    It's understandable you're feeling distraught at the moment - we've all been there, it's a riot of emotions - but, believe me, there will be a time when you sit down and say, ok, it is what it is. I've found that instead of treating it as a threat, an enemy, it is simply a small part of my body has gone out of whack, so I need to care for it. That way, I'm not fighting it, I'm co-operating with it. That approach can make a huge psychological difference.

    Good luck!
     
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  16. Delticmatt100

    Delticmatt100 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I've message Peter. Gonna get more info for him.

    Peter hang in there these shields are a godsend.
     
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