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I’m scared, please help me

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Chaseylayne76, May 23, 2018.

  1. Chaseylayne76

    Chaseylayne76 · Member

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    Hi. I’ve recently been diagnosed type 2 and although my nurse was very sympathetic I do feel like I’m kinda in this alone. She’s given me 3 months to change my diet and try to lose weight/lower my blood sugar before she thinks about putting me on meds. I’ve done a lot of reading up about how to lose weight but I’m just confusing myself about carbs and fat and protein and saturated fats. It doesn’t help that I’ve a food phobia about vegetables (don’t ask, I must have been badly traumatised lol) I don’t feel like I’m any the wiser and I’m scared. How can you lower blood sugar and lose weight? “ eat brown rice/pasta instead of white” yeah but it’s still carbs and carbs bump up your sugar levels. I don’t want this, I’ve never been sick, I’m the rock,the one people turn to and now I’m facing a life long illness. Can anybody please help me make dietary changes. Explain how much carbs I should have. What to eat when I can’t physically eat veg/salad. Help me feel less scared about my future. Maybe I’m asking a lot but I need to know I’ll be ok (oh I also have anxiety issues too lol)
     
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  2. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi Chaselayne
    Please don’t panic, you’ve come to the best little corner of the internet for Type 2s. First I’ll tag in @daisy1 for her really useful info post.
    There is a lot to learn but you have three months at least to get on top of this. I’ll tell you what I did. I was diagnosed in May ‘17. My HbA1c (the blood test used for diagnosis) was 70, anything above 48 is diabetic, it would be useful to find out what yours was. I came here and learnt so much, as you’ve already discovered it’s all about carbs, it does not matter if they are dressed in ‘healthy’ brown coats, a carb is a carb! I started by eating less than 100g carbs/day to begin with and then after 6 weeks reduced it to 50-70g/day, nowadays I tend to keep under 60g. The best way to see what foods suit you is to test your blood sugar right before a meal and then two hours after the first bite, you’re looking for a rise of no more than 2 mmol/l and to be within these recommended ranges http://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetes_care/blood-sugar-level-ranges.html
    I was started on a mild medication, but I’m guessing your HbA1c is lower as you have the option of trying diet and exercise alone.
    This has worked for me, to date I've lost over 5 1/2stone (still more to go) and got my HbA1c (blood test for 2-3 month average blood sugar) down to a non diabetic level, all due to the fantastic support and advise I got here. Read around the Forum and ask any questions that occur to you.

    Edit to add that @NoCrbs4Me doesnt eat veg, he’ll be a big help to you, I’m sure he won’t mind me tagging him.
     
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    #2 Rachox, May 23, 2018 at 12:19 PM
    Last edited: May 23, 2018
  3. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Hi and welcome aboard,

    We are all confused and scared when first diagnosed. It is quite normal, but it will pass. This forum will be a great help to you so don't be afraid to ask any questions you like.

    You aren't alone as regards vegetables. I eat very few, and rarely have any green salads. I do eat lots of mushrooms and tomatoes. (Yes, toms are fruits, but do just as well as a veg replacement). I do like peas, but these can be dicey for some people, and I have cauli/broccoli/carrots once a week normally with my Sunday roast. I call my lunches salads, but they are only things like egg mayo or tinned salmon with cherry toms and cheese. I buy lettuce and pak choi but it is for my tortoise. :)

    What you do need, and they are essential, is a blood glucose meter. With this you can test before you eat and 2 hours after first bite, and this will show you at a glance what that food has done to your blood sugar levels. Without one you are working blind. We can help you with this.
     
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  4. Bittern

    Bittern Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I also have a veg phobia but for what it's worth I suggest the plan below.

    Start by cutting out all sugary things, cake, biscuit, jams, fruit, beer etc. Reduce your intake of rice, potato and pasta to a daily total of say 70grm of carbs per day, brown rice and wholemeal pasta are better than white. Don't eat bread, crisps etc. Leave everything else alone for the moment, to do the above is enough to be going on with. You will loose weight doing this. Get a meter, SD or TEE2 as their test strips are cheaper than others, and test just before you eat, 1Hr after and then 2Hrs after, record the result. If the difference between before and 2Hrs after is about 2 or below 2 then the meal "works" for you and can be eaten again. Next time you have that meal test again, record the result do it at least 3 times and average the results. You will build up a menu of meals you can tolerate. You can eat zero carb foods, meats, cheese, butter etc. and cheese and butter can be added to some meals to slow the digestion of carbs.

    The above is the way I started and I lost nearly 20kg in 6 months, but that is NOT a target for you. Things have moved on, my meds. have reduced and I now eat less carbs than suggested above. Do it in small steps and sign up to the Low Carb Programme on this site, it has lots of good ideas.
     
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  5. There is no Spoon

    There is no Spoon I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Chasey,
    I did it by cutting out sugar. In the 3 months between first diagnosed and Diabetic Nurse appointment lowered my blood sugars noticeably and went from XXXL to medium.

    IF that's where you are just now looking for the first step to set you on the right path. It's a good first step.:D

    To be able to suggest a good "dietary change" would need to know more about what you do eat and when. But by the sound of no veg aspect Keto may be a good fit, or the carnivore diet. Both focus on protein and good healthy fats like dairy, avocado, nuts etc..

    Food is not the enemy.
    The trick is to find the things you like to eat that are good for you and eat more of them.;)
    :bag:
     
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  6. NannyP 2

    NannyP 2 Type 2 · Active Member

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    i KNOW how you feel, recently diagnosed just a few weeks ago, and had my first visit with practice nurse !!!!!! two days ago, its really daunting isn't it? like you I have researched the internet including this site and have good days emotionally and not so good days.

    My blood sugar levels are variable but lowering, so is my weight. I have reduced my carbohydrate intake, surprised myself in having a go at some of the low carb recipes and actually I am enjoying my food.

    One thing I have found extremely valuable is knowing what different food/carbohydrates do to my levels and I have purchased a blood sugar monitor.

    best wishes
     
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  7. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    It's overwhelming, isn't it... A diagnosis you're stuck with, and a diet that needs figuring out while you've got issues; dietary & anxiety ones. Been there myself...(Am there, actually!) First off, you're right; brown stuff may be better than white, but still carb heavy. Fruits are a problem too... So. That's where you decide how many carbs you want to eat per day. I started on 75-80, am now doing 20. It's a personal choice, usually going on what your meter tells you. (If you're up 2 mmol/l two hours after first bite, that meal was too carby and needs to be modified or scrapped next time. You don't have to get it right immediately!). In any case... There's still a lot left you can eat that has nothing whatsoever to do with veggies! Meats (without starchy additives), eggs, butter, cheese... Try checking Dietdoctor.com for ideas. I do eat salads too, but I have scrambled eggs with stuff in 'em every day. (Goat cheese, as cow doesn't work for me, cherry toms and mushrooms which might not work for you, load of bacon.... Sometimes add a little bit of 50% less sugar Heinz tomato ketchup). That's one meal sorted. (That's lunch. For breakfast I just have a cup of tea). Meats, meats, meats...! From cold cuts to steaks, sausages, high quality burgers... Fish too, of course. I've seen some recipies for coconut porridge and mug cakes... You won't be expected to just live off of air. I didn't find this place until I'd already sorted out my diet, but I'm hoping you'll get a flying start here. Took me 3 months to figure it out... I have a feeling you'll be faster, with the help people'll offer here. ;). Take it from someone who doesn't walk in your shoes, but has a remarcably similar pair of her own; you can do this, and it WILL be okay!
     
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  8. Chaseylayne76

    Chaseylayne76 · Member

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    Ok. Still on the verge of tears here but you guys have been very sensible with your advice. To answer a few questions you have all asked
    My reading to determine diabetes was 75 and I’m 124kg
    I do have PCOS so have kinda known there was a possibility but still very shocked
    I eat mostly white meat,white fish,raw carrots,marrow fat peas,eggs but have to be mixed up ie scrambled or omelette. No salad items. No cooked veg although have been known in the past to mix fine beans in with a mouthful of food but never on its own. Tried salmon but didn’t like it. Hate tuna,sardines etc. Do like my rice/pasta/ bread etc so this is gonna be bloody difficult.
    Haven’t got a blood meter as 1, I hate needles and 2, it was never spoken about
    I rarely drink alcohol and hate full sugar drinks
    Love fruit but I know there’s sugar in them so I can’t eat many per day
    On the whole I think my diet isn’t that bad but obviously my body says different lol
     
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  9. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Yes, it will be difficult for you, and you can multiply that difficulty by a thousand if you don't gird your loins and buy a meter. They aren't needles - they are tiny little lancets. If you buy a lancet device called Accu Chek Fastclix, the lancets are contained in a plastic drum that fits inside a sort of pen. You never see the lancets. You place the end on your finger and press the top. You do not have to use the more difficult lancet devices that come supplied with the meter. It was never spoken about by your nurse or doctor because unless you are are on insulin or strong drugs the NHS don't prescribe them. Without one you will never know what your food choices are doing to your body until your next HbA1c test, and will never have the chance to change things.

    Fruit is full of sugar in the form of fructose. Fructose is the worst kind of sugar for us because it goes straight to the liver, which regards it as toxic (as it does with alcohol), so it is turned into fat that is deposited round your liver. Fatty livers mean insulin resistance, and that means high blood sugar levels and high circulating insulin, both of which cause other health issues. The best fruits to eat are strawberries and raspberries, but only in small quantities, never as a stand alone snack, and best eaten with a meal with cream or full fat unsweetened yogurts.
     
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  10. Smallbrit

    Smallbrit Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I’ll leave those more knowledgeable to advise on meters, although I absolutely agree with them as it’ll show what you/can’t eat (and there are some surprises in there as we’re all different!).

    But on the veg thing? I got down to HBA1C 48 from 76, almost the same as you, with low carb and not necessarily increasing veggies that much. I have a lot of cheese. And nuts. And eggs. And meat. And 10-cal jelly with double cream and 85% cocoa content chocolate grated on it.

    There’s a lot of very knowledgeable people on this forum so ask lots of questions - someone usually has an answer!
     
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  11. FantomPoet

    FantomPoet Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Chaseylayne76 welcome to the forum, it is a very scarey time time when you are first diagnosed so I feel for you. I remember having a little meltdown in Heathrow Terminal 5 as I could just not see what I could eat in there as I flew out to work overseas. It gets better I promise. The overriding thing for me was taking the advice given at the time of obtaining a meter and using it to see what foods spike the blood.

    I appreciate the idea of needles is spooky but the meters tend to come with unspooky looking pens which you place against a figure and press a button. The little tiny pricker is super thin and super sharp so you barely feel it if at all. The knowledge the meter will give you will be absolutely priceless.

    I ate things and tested a couple of times afterward (one hour and two hour) and I soon found which foods were bound for the naughty step, and really quickly in the main.

    As others have said the main four things to cut down on or avoid are Bread, Pasta, Rice, and Potatoes. It is hard initially as you and your body are trained to go for those things. As you learn to reduce you may well end up like many of us on this site who abstain from them completely but time will tell.

    We are here as a support network and there are many of us on the same path just a little bit farther along that can help with useful advice and support, you are certainly not alone and many are ready willing and able to help.

    The take away first step though is get a meter, I bought my first one in Sainsburys and after that I got the test strips from e bay. I have managed to blag other meters free from unsuspecting new Diabetic Nurses or Manufacturers themselves over the last few years.

    Although I haven’t tried this site also has a service of supplying a meter and strips (I just happen to be addicted to ebay)

    Good luck on your journey we are up ahead and there is nothing too bad about the journey, it’s just a different track to what you were on.
     
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  12. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Will you stop? If we get any more in common I might think I'm having a conversation with myself here. (Got PCOS too.). You know, a meter is rather invaluable if you want to know how you're doing. Kinda flying blind without one. But, if needles are too big a thing to tackle, personally, I'd just play it safe and go for lchf, as much as you can manage. I'm following the Keto diet now, but it's not for everyone. Just see what lchf does in terms of weightloss, and your next HbA1c. I think with a few modifications to your menu you'll get ahead fast. White fish, baked in grassfed butter and some mayo would be perfect... Sheesh, now I'm getting hungry! The peas, beans and carrots are carby, so maybe dial those down a little? I use cauliflower rice as a rice/potato substitute... I'm guessing that's a useless idea though... Far as bread goes, maybe whoopsie bread is an option? (I can't due to the dairy in those, but that's not a problem for you!). Fruit is basically out, but most berries are fine in moderation. Strawberries with unsweetened/stevia cream could be a dietary staple... ;) Full fat greek yoghurt with berries might be too? Like I said, Dietdoctor may have more suggestions that are okay... Just take it a day at a time, and try to decide for yourself what amount of carbs you want to aim for per day. It's easier to stick to it all, if you have a cut-off point. And hey, like many people here tend to say; diabetes is a marathon, not a sprint. If it takes you longer than 3 months to get your numbers and weight down, you have to discuss meds again.... Doesn't mean you will be on them for the rest of your life if you do start taking something. I was on metformin and gliclazide, besides statins. Once I got the diet sorted, it all went out the window. ;)
     
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  13. Chaseylayne76

    Chaseylayne76 · Member

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    Lol it’s not fun having PCOS and I think because I was told at 19 I had little to no chance of having a child naturally I’ve punished my body and myself mentally for not being a “real woman” so this feels like another thing my body has got wrong this for me is going to be a bigger mental challenge than anything else and I need to get my mind around things. I was prescribed metformin a long time ago to try and treat my PCOS but I had a god awful time with it and I do not want to go back on it now! Ok so more meat and cheese? I can do that lol and get a meter with a pen, shouldn’t be too hard I guess. One step at a time, I’ll try
     
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  14. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @Chaseylayne76

    Hello Chaseylayne and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it interesting and useful. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will come and help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  15. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    @Chaseylayne76

    Well done ...... bite the bullet and get hold of a meter and lancing device, and lancets.

    These are the Fastclix ones, but have a Google round because you will get them cheaper elsewhere
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/shop/accu-chek-fastclix-lancing-device
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/shop/accu-chek-fastclix-lancets-200

    The most popular meters for self funding T2's are the Codefree and the Tee2 because the strips are much cheaper than other meters, and you need a lot of strips. You can't buy them in pharmacies.

    Try here for the Codefree meter
    http://homehealth-uk.com/product-category/blood-glucose/blood-glucose-monitor/

    and here for the extra strips (you will need a lot)
    http://homehealth-uk.com/all-products/sd-codefree-test-strips-to-be-used-only-with-the-sd-monitor/

    There are discount codes if you buy in bulk. (applied at the check out stage)
    5 packs 264086
    10 packs 975833

    The Tee2 is here and the meter is free.
    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product/tee2-blood-glucose-meter/

    Don’t forget to check the box that you have diabetes so you can buy VAT free. (for either meter)
     
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  16. vanillapie

    vanillapie Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    One of the best things I learned from this forum is that veggies aren't all as important as they're cracked up to be. I hate most veggies, and the ones I do like are too carby for me to have now. I rarely eat veggies now, maybe a bit of spinach, lettuce or cucumber, occasionally some riced broccoli with some garlic, but very little. Unfortunately I love fruit, but I am learning to have just the occasional grape or berry (put them in the freezer to make them last longer when eating!). It's the carbs that are the issue.

    I highly recommend this forum for help, tips and support - I've only been here a month or so, with anxiety issues also, and have found it to be invaluable in coming to terms with things and changing my diet.

    Getting a meter will be useful. Most testers come with lancets and pens in which you don't see the lancet itself and you just press a button. I still have to work myself up to press the button each time, but it's over within a second. Definitely worth considering if you're serious about taking control of your health.

    Good luck on your journey - we're all here to help! :)
     
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  17. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    There is a slow release metformin that might not have the effect the other kind had. (I still call that period Metformin Hell. That made me determined to make a diet/lifestyle chang work!). But I did okay on gliclazide... Just didn't need it anymore.

    They dropped the ball when they found my cyst; I had a replacement who didn't order follow up tests. And all I knew was that kids were a no-go. There were other issues, the cyst just was discovered by accident, so other things got more attention at the time... I was diabetic for YEARS before I found out, using our diabetic cat's meter when I was trying to find out why my liver was fatty. Urgh. And yeah, I know the not-a-proper-woman feeling. I have infertile friends -various reasons- and I don't see any of them as any less of a woman, but applying the same logic to yourself is a different story eh. (My legs are hairier than my husband's, which also doesn't help one feeling feminine! Thanks, PCOS!). So, no kids, but we love the cat to bits instead. Besides, everything I have is hereditary.... The migraines, rheumatism, hypothyroidism, PCOS, Type 2, introverted borderline personality disorder, clinical depression, anxiety, etc etc... Not thinking twice about giving my kid the mental and physical pain I've lived with all my life. So I guess in some way it was a blessing in my case, if I try really hard to find a silver lining. (Try really, REALLY hard)...

    I have read up a lot about how low carb eating affects other things.... In the past year, once I got over the shock of the diagnosis, I did notice I got less panic attacks, and the depression doesn't seem to run anywhere near as deep as it did before. I seem to have a better grip. And Keto is sometimes effective in treating PCOS. But my bloodsugars are good, and I lost 20 kilo's, which were the original goals. I dunno... I just hope you'll find a way forward that works for you.
     
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  18. eggs11

    eggs11 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum @Chaseylayne76. I too didn't like the idea of using a meter, but quickly got used to it and now consider it the most important tool in controlling my diabetes by far. All of us are different and so what may raise one person's bs won't necessarily raise another's. Testing keeps me on the right path and reassures me when working blind would have been much more stressful.
     
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  19. Grungysquash

    Grungysquash Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the club - it's certainly a wake-up call.

    Everyone including myself was a tad shocked I've never been in hospital or sick. So getting this was a real wake up.

    The key is - lose weight, as others have said low carb diet helps, that's a no brainer same as reducing sugar, you will be surprised how much sugar is in everything processed, you don't think your actually eating much then read on the side 100gm containes 23gm carbs, 15gm of which is stated as sugar.

    I now read the side of packages and buy whatever is lowest, plenty of products state low fat, but you will be stunned at the sugar content they don't state on the fancy picture.

    So welcome to the journey to get better, you can do it, I've done it - and it's never actually over just work out what way works for u to lose the weight.

    You don't need to join a gym, weight watchers, or any fancy cleansing diet. But if they help you lose the weight then all good.

    I was 120kg now 95 - 97kg depending on the day. For me that was enough for my body to fix itself and I'm off meds. For u it might be more it might be less or simply it might be never and you will need to remain on medication. Everyone is different but if u catch type two early enough hopefully there is no damaged cells and your body can fix itself by losing the weight, assisted by the meds.

    So good luck, it's all up to you. We can sympathize and help motivate but in the end it's all u baby. So figure out what works for u - and get motivated to get better.
     
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  20. Chaseylayne76

    Chaseylayne76 · Member

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    A free meter! What’s the catch? Lol are the strips universal? ie does the link for the strips fit the tee2?
     
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