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Late type 1 not type 2

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Helen_S-C, Feb 26, 2016.

  1. Helen_S-C

    Helen_S-C Type 1 · Active Member

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    After a few months of feeling unwell and having consistently high numbers (last hba1c 113) I have been "upgraded" to type 1 after an original type 2 diagnosis, I'm 40 years old. I started insulin on Tuesday after being given an emergency appointment.
    15u lantus
    8u novorapid

    When I read all of the info from my diabetic team the focus is on carb counting, before I was told to go low carb. Do I need to eat more carbs now? How many in a day?
    I haven't yet seen a dietician and I don't have an appointment for the diabetic clinic until the end of April.
     
  2. LucySW

    LucySW Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member

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    Diet Doctor http://www.dietdoctor.com/ is a good site for low carb.

    If you're adult-onset Type 1, check out the LADA/Type 1.5 sub forum on here.

    As you eat less carb, test and test and keep an eye on your BG and your insulin dose. You will almost certainly need less insulin as you put less carb load into your body. Really pay attention - take the insulin you need to keep in the range you want, not more than that, or you may temporarily risk a hypo.

    It's good news actually, because if you pay attention you can get your BG level down much closer to where you want it. And that's really good.

    Read read read !!

    Good luck.
     
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    #2 LucySW, Feb 26, 2016 at 9:19 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 26, 2016
  3. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
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    hi there @Helen_S-C
    bless you hun -- that will be a proper rollercoaster you have been on :(

    your D team have put you on a basal ( long acting) / Bolus ( quick acting ) regime.
    but it looks as though it is a set dose regime.

    if they have put you on 8u fast acting they are probably assuming a 1u per 10 carb ratio which equals 80 grams carb per meal..

    so the first thing I would do is go back and query with them a menu that you can do that fits this carb pattern ................. alternatively............ ask to get on a carb counting course immediately so you can tailor your diet to fit your needs and inject the same ( to your needs ) hope this has made sense ( i know there is a lot to take in )



    all the best !!
     
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  4. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You don’t NEED to low-carb, but you may find that it is easier to manage your levels and insulin intake on a low-carb diet. I have personally made the choice to low-carb (like many others with type 1), but I will happily enjoy myself on rare occasions with as much as 500g of carbs in a day (that’s obviously a bad idea for the most part).


    Carb counting is the foundation of insulin management because it allows you to calculate how much insulin you need for a particular meal. That makes it more of a math problem and takes some of the guesswork out of the equation.


    Unfortunately, even if you know your insulin:carb ratio, that doesn’t mean everything is easy…just EASIER. Many people find their ratios change slightly throughout the day, and our bodies don’t always process carbs at the same rate.


    In layman’s terms, eating 500g of carbs a day is kind of like trying to guess how many tennis balls will fit in a swimming pool. In theory, you could calculate the answer, but even a slight miscalculation could make your answer off by thousands.


    Eating 50g of carbs is kind of like trying to guess how many tennis balls will fit in a 1ft x 1ft x1ft box. It’s still not easy, and you can still miscalculate, but it’s a heck of a lot easier and even if you make a mistake, you probably wouldn't be off by very many.
     
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  5. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    What a great comparison!!
     
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  6. Helen_S-C

    Helen_S-C Type 1 · Active Member

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    Thanks guys for your responses, it just seems so complicated! I don't want to get in the habit of eating what I like and adapting insulin to suit, I want to eat healthily and get back in the gym. I'm doing the great north run in sept and I haven't trained for weeks now due to generally feeling unwell and muscle pain. I desperately want to be training again but that will be another insulin hurdle to jump - excuse the pun!
     
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  7. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. Yes do carb-count - it's vital to good control. Keep up the low-carbing as it's healthy. Much better to match the insulin to a lower level of carbs than vice versa. The blood sugar swings will be lower and the risk of weight gain lower. The nice thing is you can go mad occasionally and just Bolus for that event.
     
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  8. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
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    small sidetrack here-- i broke my shoulder just over a year ago -- i could not test my own blood , give my own injections, , even get in the shower by myself --- the point I am making is ............slow down , don't be too hard on yourself , give yourself time to make adjustments
    ( i look back and figure I missed the best part of a year with the shoulder break)

    so point is -- try to relax and take 1 day at a time and do the best you can until you can get to where you want to be !!:)

    all the best !!
     
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  9. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's all about putting in the time to learn it. If you're willing to do that it's easy.

    I'd say it takes about 20 hours of reading/learning to learn all of the carb counting basics. That may sound like a lot, but I taught myself in less than a week after diagnosis.

    If you read for an hour or two before bed every night, this can become second nature to you in a couple weeks. If you rely solely on your doctor's visits it's going to take you years.

    No one wants to get in the habit of eating nonsense, but that has nothing to do with insulin. Your insulin should ALWAYS match what you eat whether that's vegetables or an entire gallon of ice cream. Remember, your body used to automatically do that for you. Nothing has changed aside from now it's a manual process.
     
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  10. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Carb counting is strange to start with, but soon becomes second nature. There are lots of tips to help you, so please don't think its hard or too daunting. I was taught in diagnosis and had a dietician spend an hour or so with me, giving me a booklet of carbs in common foods, and off I went.

    I've perfected my technique a bit since then, but I promise you it's not hard :) Now the Great North Run - that's hard ;)

    Be kind to yourself and don't think you have to do everything at once.
     
  11. Helen_S-C

    Helen_S-C Type 1 · Active Member

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    I am reading every day so will keep going with that. I have lost almost 4 stone over the last year trying to eat right but also due to high numbers and metformin!! I struggle to eat well like lots of people and am desperately trying not to bury my head in the sand! I appreciate all your help, I'll keep going and hope my numbers level out!
     
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  12. Helen_S-C

    Helen_S-C Type 1 · Active Member

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    What did you read? Booklets, diabetes uk, NHS??
     
  13. LucySW

    LucySW Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member

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  14. Helen_S-C

    Helen_S-C Type 1 · Active Member

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    Thanks LucySW
     
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  15. linda321

    linda321 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm the same as you - originally diagnosed as type 2, but the meds didn't work, now diagnosed type 1. I agree with the others, don't be too hard on yourself, it does take time to get it right!
     
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  16. ArtemisBow

    ArtemisBow Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Another tool that's really helpful with carb counting is the Carbs & Cals app - it shows you pictures and weights of lots of different foods and the carbs in them. I found there is no better way to learn than to practice, and just started counting the carbs in each of my meals and writing them down (even if I didn't know how to change my dose yet).
     
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  17. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Well the best news is that are now on insulin so you can start to take control of your blood glucose levels and your body will start to feel a lot better so that's a huge positive. It is trial and error, each of us are different in our own unique way but knowledge is so important, if your ready buy the books and learn as much as you can, you will be your own expert in no time, also stay positive, mindset is a fundamental part of good care, well done also for looking to take part in the great north run, I would love to do it but can't run very far lol !!!!
     
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  18. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    By the way jelly babies are a great way of managing low blood sugars whilst doing training, easy and quick way to boost your blood glucose levels, 3 for me picks me up quick if I'm out on my road bike ;)
     
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  19. Helen_S-C

    Helen_S-C Type 1 · Active Member

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    Thanks Juicyj, I am finding it hard to be positive as I've not felt well for so long but maybe it's now psychological and I need to give myself a kick up the arse!! I'm doing gnr for cf as my friends little girl has it so I think I'll focus on that and get back out even if it's just walking to start with. I didn't mention I also have a 3 and 2 year old so jelly sweets are generally available in our house! I worry that they are suffering at the moment so I need to pick myself up for them too. They are my priority but if I'm not well I'm no good to them so getting my levels right and feeling more energetic is the most important thing to me.
     
  20. Meghalton

    Meghalton Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I found that going on a carb course was such a great help. It really let's you understand how to control your insulin and foods!
    I'm sorry you have to cope with diabetes and your kids, but over time you will get use to it, and you will understand it more. Don't be so hard on yourself, you are going through a difficult time. This forum has helped me loads, people on here know more then nurses and doctors haha!
     
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