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Low Carb Diet, newly diagnised

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Rocksteady, Mar 2, 2021.

  1. Rocksteady

    Rocksteady · Member

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    Hi everyone

    I have been confirmed as Type 2 diabetic. I had an Hba1c of 50. I have been reading various contributions on this forum and other sources and understand that a Low Carb Diet may help me reduce my Hba1c to a lower level. My weight is 18 stone and male. My height is 1.80m. I am not on any medication for diabetes and nurse advised I did not to test my glucose levels at this stage. She emphasized lifestyle changes around diet and exercising. My question is
    1. How long is it likely to take to reach a lower level of 42mmol/mol. I understand we are all different but I would be interested in your experiences in trying to lower this through low carb diet.
    2. Any links to low carb meal plans? I have tried to follow a link from this site but it requires a subscription fee which I cannot afford at present. I will also welcome any tips on the low carb diet
    3. Any suggestions on exercising. I have started going for very short 'walk jog ' and so far only managing a mile of mostly walking and 25% jogging. Will this be sufficient? Previously my activity levels were non existent

    Looking forward to your responses

    Many thanks
     
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    #1 Rocksteady, Mar 2, 2021 at 1:54 PM
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2021
  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Diet is key.. low carb is good.. ketogenic is likely slightly more effective (in my opinion).
    50mmol/m is "only just" T2.

    My HbA1c went from 87 mmol/m to 36 mmol/m in 3 months with intermittent fasting and keto.
    Weight loss around 120 pounds. Screenshot 2021-03-02 at 13.57.40.png

    Exercise whilst probably helping overall health (debateable but hey) won't be as effective in weight loss so change what you eat.
     
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  3. Rocksteady

    Rocksteady · Member

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    This is inspiring. Will also look more into the Ketogenic diet as well. In my 'research' I had mostly focused on low carb. Many thanks.
     
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  4. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Shucks.. thanks but it's not just me loads of others here have had similar success.

    Check out the success stories threads.
     
  5. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. That HBA1C level is not bad at all and only needs a slight reduction. Your T2 will almost certainly be due to insulin resistance (fat deposits) which blocks insulin going to the muscles. A low carb diet will force the body to burn fat and/or slow fat storage. Carbs turn to glucose in the stomach and if not immediately used for energy needs they will be stored as fat. Think of Keto as an extreme form of low-carb where the body goes into ketosis (fat burning) to obtain it's energy needs. You don't need to subscribe to the low-carb part of this website to understand the basics. For packaged goods look at the Total Carbs on the back of the pack and keep the daily total down. Set yourself an initial limit of perhaps 150gm/day or less. Have enough fats and proteins to keep you feeling full. There are various books and info online to tell you the carb content of all foods. I have Carbs & Cals on my phone, there is Diet Doctor and so on. Do get a meter - it's virtually essential to take control.
     
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  6. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I would be surprised if you did not reverse within 3 months, with non diabetic numbers maybe mid 30's or below. The hard part is not being blown off track with the things that got you into this club in the first place once you've reversed. I would go straight to Keto, and then if required loosen to low carb (but I am maximal and always in a hurry for results).

    @bulkbiker is completely right the food is key. Inline with this is sleep quality. After these stress management and exercise top the major items off. Exercise is rubbish for fat loss as too many hours are required, but exercise is great for body re composition - I would recommend walking after meals, then building up to great form focused resistance training at a high intensity, power building. So far today I have walked 7500 steps, 50 push-ups (first thing), 5 x 3 135 kg dead lifts, 5 x 3 100 kg squats in 9 minutes and 40 bicep curls. My second workout after dinner 5 x 3 135 kg dead lifts, 5 x 3 100 kg squats in 5.5 minutes, will be going for a walk shortly. As I am using short rests and good form glucose will be pushed out very quickly, the downside is mentally it is tough but less than 15 minutes (I will do one more round later along with something else). If you go down this type of road build up and slowly.

    Many of "us" agree on the ingredients below (search Instagram for meals with these ingredients (e.g. https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/ketomeals/)

    https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/foods
    upload_2021-3-2_17-45-40.png

    Forget what you learned about breakfast, have your first meal at any time with any of the above especially meat, fish and eats in any combination.
     
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    #6 Mbaker, Mar 2, 2021 at 6:13 PM
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2021
  7. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Rocksteady, Welcome to the forum.
    You really need to get yourself a Blood Glucose meter no matter what your nurse says.
    We Type 2 diabetics have a range of (bad) reactions to carbs in food. Some can happily eat things that for others would spike their Blood Glucose really high. How can you tell which foods are best for you unless you test your own reaction to them?

    The GPs and Nurses who tell you not to test are the same ones who advise that T2 is a lifestyle disease, but never see a patient get better through lifestyle! The same ones who prescribe more and more medication as the patients get worse.

    Well at least you have heard that Low Carb (higher Protein & Fat) will almost certainly fix your Blood Glucose.
    But trying to implement that without testing is like trying to steer by looking in the rear view mirror. Even if you have an HbA1C every 3 months how on earth are you expected to know if it was the 'healthy' wholemeal bread, or the 'healthy' carrots or the 'healthy 'porridge that wrecked you Blood glucose?

    So get a meter with cheap(er) test strips since you will need to test every meal at first.
    You can buy either the SD Gluco Navii or the Spirit Healthcare TEE2 online. The ones in the pharmacy use more expensive test strips. Both those have strips costing around £8 per pot of 50 (you will need at least a couple of pots to start with).

    Test before every meal and then 2hrs after first bite. Your 2 goals are:
    1. Maximum reading of 8.5 mmol
    2. No more than a 2.0 mmol rise from before the meal to 2hrs after first bite. Those 2 readings per meal are enough to get you started.
    Keep a food diary and record you pre and post meal (prandial) readings as well as what you ate and how much of it you ate.
     
  8. KennyA

    KennyA Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, welcome to the forum. You are almost exactly where I was in December 2019. I was maybe a pound or two lighter and a bit taller, but same HbA1c of 50. I went strict low carb (<20g/day) and after four months was back in normal range (38) in April 2020. No significant increase in exercise either. I tested my BG four or five times a day and found out what raised my glucose levels unacceptably, and what didn't. Then I avoided the stuff that did. Next month (April '21) I'll get my "in remission" badge. There's nothing special about me - these forums are full of people who've made bigger reductions more quickly. Best of luck.

    I found a lot on the diet doctor website, which IIRC has some open access areas and (I think) does a free month's membership. I'll attach a few links I found useful:
    https://lowcarbskipton.com
    https://seriouslylowcarb.com
    https://josekalsbeek.blogspot.com/2019/11/the-nutritional-thingy.html
    https://alldayidreamaboutfood.com/
    https://headbangerskitchen.com/
    https://www.dietdoctor.com/
    https://getdrunknotfat.com/
     
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  9. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and welcome,

    Like many others I reduced my HbA1c into the mid range of normal within 3 months from diagnosis by going keto.

    You need a meter- I can't stress that enough. You will n to be able to work out how many carbs and what types if any carbs your body can tolerate. Some can eat a small amount of potato for example others cannot.

    The medical profession by and large consider it a progressive illness so not worth testing your levels. Many many here have put it into remission by testing and reducing their carb intake.

    good luck and welome.
     
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  10. Rocksteady

    Rocksteady · Member

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    Hi all
    Thank you all for taking time to share your knowledge, experiences and ideas in managing this condition. As a result of this I will be:
    1- Buying a glucometer and test myself many times to understand any impact on my glucose level from the food that I eat.

    2- I will join the Diet Doctor for more details around meals plans for low carb Keto

    3- Go for walks after meals where possible

    4- Prioritize my sleep

    5- Continue with exercise on the basis of helping with body re composition

    I have heard of bulletproof coffee, how effective is it in supporting weight loss whilst on a keto diet?
     
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  11. britishpub

    britishpub Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My only advice would be not to overthink things

    It’s not rocket science and while I would never knock those who take a far more scientific approach than I have ever, it is really easy to change the way you look at food and what you need to eat

    Basically the heavy carbs are easy to identify and just cutting those out and avoiding sweet things will lower your carb intake hugely with little effort

    The single thing I am adamant about is not to look for inadequate substitutes for the carbs

    It won’t help, and will probably just make you yearn for what you have decided you don’t want to eat

    After 5+ years I don’t even think about what to eat, or to buy

    It’s a complete change in the way you look at food and will come naturally to you in a short time

    You’ve caught it early, so the sooner you make the change the sooner your new more satisfying life can begin
     
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  12. Bash_

    Bash_ Type 1 · Member

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    Hi there.
    Only thing I would say, if you burn it off, there's nothing wrong with carbs, I should know I'm active and albeit t1 without the carbs I consume I'd flake out due to exercise always on the go.

    Carbs, high fibre and exercise, but by the sounds of it, you pretty much have things under control.

    Keep up the good work.
     
  13. LaoDan

    LaoDan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    A great diet is key! Regarding exercise, I like to do resistance training. Building the engine that burns the glucose. Walking, biking is awesome too! Not a fan of jogging as it’s hard on the knees.
     
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  14. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Just a cautionary note, damage can and anecdotally does occur with that approach. I am one of those anecdotes who trained 3 hours a day at high intensity and ate higher carb to get a "good" result of A1c's of 41-42, i've been in the 30's since rejecting the starchy and high gi carbs and less exercise.

    Dr Peter Attia, Professor Tim Noakes, Sir Steven Redgrave, Sami Inkinen are examples of either elite or just below athletes who developed diabetes or pre-diabetes whilst being slim, exercising and carbing up. Carbs (the wrong type) cause inflammation and can lead to insulin resistance hence why some top athletes cannot out exercise the glucose. Keto based athletes generally say they can train more regularly due to the lack of inflammation.
     
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  15. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    Its very different using exogenous insulin as a type 1 than for a typical type 2 who is over producing insulin and not using it effectively. Exercise - particularly resistance exercise - can help the body to deal with excess glucose but it’s no substitute for improving insulin sensitivity by reducing carbs for someone with type 2. The extent to which they need to be reduced will vary (hence the advice to test), but there’s no getting away from the need to reduce them.

    As someone consuming very few carbs (as close to zero as I can get it), I have no problem fuelling exercise as my body burns fat in preference to glucose.
     
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  16. Rocksteady

    Rocksteady · Member

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    Once again thanks for taking time to share advice and the general positive vibe. You make this a very good forum.
    I have now set myself a 3 month target to reduce the Hba1c to at least 45. Obviously if I manage to get it even lower than 45 I will be a very happy person indeed.
     
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