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New Type 2, Questions & Concerns

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Changedling, Jan 2, 2020.

  1. Changedling

    Changedling · Newbie

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    Hello all,

    Happy New Year, as of yesterday I have been diagnosed with Type 2 at the age of 28 (M). I'm shocked I'm a Type 2 with my age and me being under weight, BMI of 19.55. I questioned my Dr. about me being Type 1 or Type 1.5, My Dr. said all my other tests were good and c-peptide was also fine and in the normal range 1.1. My other blood results came back good, kidney and liver function OK etc.

    Some background I went in to the Dr office and high glucose was found in a urine analysis. My blood was then tested via finger prick to show a fasting level of 326 after a very carb heavy meal and a few large glasses of sweet tea late last night. My A1C came back at a 10.1. I'm sure the Christmas & Thanksgiving food binges and some alcohol did not help.

    I hope my Dr. is correct with the diagnosis and at this time I have been prescribed medication to help with cholesterol, and also Januvia. I have yet to start the Januvia as I'm waiting on it to go through, my insurance wants me to try Metformin first. Without medication and with my diet alone, for the past week my BG has been around 110-130 range.

    I'm a paranoid individual at heart and with my recent diagnosis I requested a stress test for heart and cardiovascular health. I hope that turns out fine as well but I figured I need to get it done moving forward. I have also requested a diabetes educator and also have been told I will be meeting with a nutritionist as well.

    All my vitals so far have come back OK, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, pulse, etc are all normal. My HDL was low and LDL was OK. My triglycerides were elevated (198) but from what I hear that can be brought down with exercise etc.

    From what I have been reading when some one is diagnosed T2 in their younger years such as myself. The life expectancy is 50 years of age or possibly less. I will be 100% compliant with my diagnosis, is this statistic really that accurate for those who diet well, exercise and do routine check ups?

    I can't help but feel (dirty). Like maybe I did this to myself I've felt a wave of emotions this past week angry, frustrated, sad, confused, and a little bit happy that at least maybe I caught it early and I can do something about it. Assuming my stress test comes back OK what can I do to live a long and happy life with my family and friends?

    Does anyone have experience with Januvia vs Metformin has anyone been diagnosed young and is now older to tale the tale and their journey? Can anyone provide recipes? I will be talking to a nutritionist but can any one give me information as maybe a keto diet vs LCHF that I've been reading about?

    Could some one tell me how to convert my BG to what other people on this forum say such as a fasted BG was a 7 this morning etc? I just know the 100-150 type of measurement my Libre tells me. I'm not sure how long this has been going on, sometimes I feel maybe its been a very long time other times I think maybe in the last 2 years. I've recently the past year been getting dizzy and have been waking up in the night to urinate, I have cold hands and feet but outside of that I never really expected this.

    I'm a total novice, I'm lost, I'm confused, I'm seeking help. I'm trying to educate myself as much as possible and I know it will all come in time. Any advice, assistance, stories, anything, at this moment I just feel kind of alone, so anything would be very much appreciated.

    Thank you
     
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    #1 Changedling, Jan 2, 2020 at 7:25 AM
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  2. ianpspurs

    ianpspurs Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi @Changedling and my sympathy for the worry and search for answers caused by your diagnosis. In terms of conversion here is a link which may help https://www.diabetes.co.uk/blood-sugar-converter.html - you are on mg/dl at the moment so enter your numbers in that box and it will convert. Hope this helps at least with that part. If you find your way to the low carb programme and success stories you may also find more reassurance. If you haven't already found your way here many people find this a useful resource https://www.dietdoctor.com/
     
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  3. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    Hi @Changedling and welcome to the forum.

    @ianpspurs has given some excellent advice above. In addition you might want to check out the following information for those newly diagnosed. Have a good read and ask as many questions as you like. https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/basic-information-for-newly-diagnosed-diabetics.17088/

    @Caeseji was diagnosed at a young age. Tagging him for moral support.

    I don’t know enough about c-peptide or other associated tests to comment on your concerns about being type 1 but over 10% (I’m not sure of the exact number) of type 2s are not overweight when diagnosed. There are a number on here, but I’m struggling to remember who, so can’t tag. Hopefully some of them will be along soon.

    Keep us posted on your progress.
     
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  4. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Is your diagnosis surprising, seeing your background? Yes, it is. But there are young T2's, and there are slim T2's (10% of those diagnosed never were overweight to begin with). Still, I'd suggest doing a repeat of the C-Peptide and GAD tests in a year's time or something... Just in case it's LADA or anything. In the meantime, https://www.diabetes.co.uk/blood-sugar-converter.html will help you convert your numbers (you might want to mention both when you post), and me, I have a printed out list of numbers for quick reference when someone posts on here, which you might prefer. https://ihch.nl/assets/downloads/omrekentabel-mmol-naar-mg-glucosemeters.pdf (It's in English, but the site is Dutch).

    I was on metformin for a little while but got really, really ill, which is a side effect it has for quite a few people. For some it fades after a few weeks, for some, like me, it doesn't, so you're stuck in the loo 24/7... Was switched to Gliclazide, which I understand does something similar to Januvia: force the pancreas to keep the level of insulin up. Basically wringing blood from a stone and not advisable for the long term, as a pancreas can get exhausted eventually, and you're a bit young to roll those dice. (You still want it to work 30 years from now, after all.) If you're willing to go the diet route, you could quite likely avoid medication all together, especially handy if your insurance is giving you a hard time.

    You could start with LCHF, and progress to keto if you want to. LCHF is a good place to start if you have never tried a diet like this before. The basic difference? LCHF is low carb, but that can be any level of low carb: moderate, really low... I guess anywhere from 120 to 20 grams of carbs a day. You hit ketosis when you're at 20 grams of carbs a day, or less. (Well, some hit ketosis at 30 grams, for instance, but at 20 it's pretty much guaranteed). That's when the body stops using carbohydrates for fuel, and you become fat-adapted. You start burning (body and nutritional) fat rather than carbs. As you're slim there is some likelihood there is fat packed on the pancreas and liver which you can't actually see on the outside (It would require an ultrasound), but once that's gone you don't want to lose more weight, so i don't advise intermittent fasting for you. Anyway, keto's a choice you can make, but considering your current body weight, and numbers, I'd say cut some more carbs out than you seem to already have, see what it gets you blood glucose wise, but you're on the right path.

    As for feeling dirty.... Hey, you didn't know you had a metabolic disorder that makes you unable to process carbs. Your neighbour might eat carbier foods than you do and not be genetically predisposed to this, and have no problems at all with it, for life. I was overweight, couldn't get anything off, and went to a dietician. I followed her advice to the letter (adding 6 slices of brown bread per day, pasta, spuds, rice, and cut out all fat.... Which was the exact opposite of what I needed!). And ended up about 30 kilo's heavier than when I started seeing her. Morbidly obese, in constant pain, fatigued... and diabetic. I didn't bring this on myself, my genes and ovarian cyst did. And not knowing what was going on, I did what I could, and still got to be a T2. So forget the blame game: If you don't know what's wrong, you can't fix it. So... Now you know, and now you can!

    https://josekalsbeek.blogspot.com/2019/11/the-nutritional-thingy.html <-- this is basically what I wish someone'd told me right when I was diagnosed. I spent months just basically crying my eyes out because I thought I was going to kick the bucket, and make my husband an early widower. If I'd found this place sooner, there would've been oodles of hope and advice here, but i plowed through a bunch of books by myself and experimented with my meter. Took me three months to get back into the normal range, but it could've happened a lot quicker if I'd had some good-sense advice... Which was not the advice I got from the two dieticians (One of which the one who adviced high carb, low fat, which she was still peddling at the hospital!!) and my endo. The only one who was supportive through all this was my GP, so do be ready for some resistance. At the same time, I have to add, a lot of people here do LCHF, Keto, Carnivore and whatever diet that is basically low carb, and they're pretty much doing well. Me, I lost a bit of weight and my blood glucose is fine. As for Cholesterol... Statins can drive up blood glucose and can actually cause T2 in some individuals. Newly diagnosed T2's just get them perscribed as a mater of course, without taking that into consideration. Just so you know, low carb/keto/etc can bring your lipids down without medication. So you might want to steer clear, but that's up to you. For me, it just made my rheumatism worse. And when i went low carb my cholesterol fixed itself.

    Keep in mind that someone who is diagnosed a T2 when they're young, and get the "regular" treatment which you're not getting prescribed, then yeah, T2 is a progressive disease and you're getting a head start, meaning you have a long time to accumulate damage to organs and whatnot. That's the scary bit. The hopeful bit? If you tackle your diet NOW, you can stop this in its tracks and get your numbers back into the normal range. Do it without or with very little medication, and you won't suffer complications which may prove lethal later. You can kick T2's ***, and you'll live well beyond your fifties. (Sheesh, you'd think I make money off of low carb, haha. Seriously though... I spend less on groceries than I used to, and I am quite happy with what I do eat.).

    You're going to live to a ripe old age. Provided you don't get hit by a truck or anything.
    Hugs,
    Jo

    (just wanted to apologise for the many typo's, my shoulder's acting up a little and that makes typing difficult)
     
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  5. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    Hi and welcome @Changedling

    this is easier said than done, but beating yourself up and blaming yourself is a very negative way to try and cope - although I am sure that most people diagnosed with type 2 start off like this - the cultural and media belief systems virtually guarantee it.

    Fortunately, the more you learn about glucose dysregulation and the complicated dance our bodies must make to cope with the modern way of eating, the more you will realise that it isn’t worth playing the blame game.

    welcome to the forum.
     
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  6. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and welcome,

    You must be feeling overwhelmed and stressed at the moment. Fortunately you have found the best place in the world for diabetics to get information, advice and support.

    The first bit of advice I would give is to read the links that you've been given above. After you've read them feel free to ask questions- there is a lot of information on this site but you don't have to know everything straight away.

    The second piece of advice I would give is to get a meter and test regularly. This is the only way for you got know how your body is doing and in particular how your body is coping with the food you are eating.

    Welcome to this site, good luck and let is know if you have any questions or just need support or need to vent.
     
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  7. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Changedling,
    You must be kidding! 50yrs? - more like another 50 or more if you can (like many) use a changed 'Way Of Eating' to reverse your Type 2. Like most who have reversed their Type 2 with diet alone, the kick in the backside I got from being diagnosed was a really good thing. It made me find this forum and improve my health through LCHF.
    Officially it took me 4 months to do that, but in reality I got my Blood Glucose back down low enough to guarantee that within a couple of weeks of getting my Blood Glucose meter.

    If I'd not been brainwashed that carbs and whole grains and 5 potions of Fruit and Veg per day were better for me, I might have avoided my 3x Coronary Bypass and never been diagnosed with T2, because I'm now eating the food which I preferred in the first place! The reason I was so scared of heart problems was that my dad died of a heart attack aged 45yrs.

    LCHF (using traditional fats - not those high in Omega 6 seed oils 'euphemistically called 'vegetable oil') actually raised my HDL, and if it were not from me trying the Dave Feldman protocol to 'cheat' my LDL figures, I'm confident that my Triglycerides would have also improved. Don't fear Fats - fear Carbs instead.
     
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  8. TriciaWs

    TriciaWs Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Lots of good advice here.
    Just to add that I had raised triglycerides when diagnosed, but going low carb with extra fats in my diet turned that around - confusing my doctor and diabetic nurse.

    My GP didn't know much about the research but was willing to let me try the drug free route, my nurse not so keen and wanted to 'rectify' the GP's mistake in not prescribing metformin and statins. By my next visit she was convinced it works.
    The dietitian was a waste of time, she advised against going LCHF as it would raise my cholesterol, etc, etc. It didn't.
    If I'd followed her advice I'd be on drugs and looking at slowly declining function.
     
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  9. Lotties

    Lotties Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    [QUOTE="Changedling, post:
    ...
    I can't help but feel (dirty). Like maybe I did this to myself...
    Thank you[/QUOTE]

    Nope, no blame here. Do not, I repeat, do not beat yourself up. You did not 'do' this to yourself.
    https://www.bloodsugar101.com/the-real-causes-of-type-2-diabetes.
    On the other hand, you can do something about it with help from the good people here (note-no medical advice or diagnoses as we're not qualified to do so.)
    Welcome.
    .
     
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  10. Norfolkmell

    Norfolkmell Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi changedling and welcome,
    Do not blame yourself , being so young you haven't had the 60+ years I've had of believing carbs were the diabetics friend and fat the enemy. I have a huge t2 family link and all of them wouldn't go without eating, hungry or not, mostly carbs, some veg and no 'natural' fat and low fat processed foods in abundance no wonder they all had complications.

    My own experience with Metformin is that I've had no new side effects but as I have IBS as well I may not have noticed. I've had unexplained dizziness for almost five years now which started 18months before my t2 diagnosis which my GP has tried all sorts of medications to control none of which have worked but I've never been told it's related to t2.

    Everyone on here will support you and you will find that we all mostly LCHF with help from our meters. I test before and two hours after every meal and record everything plus what I've eaten to discover what affects my BG most at the moment stress is my biggest challenge (we are moving house, expected to move in the summer put into storage a lot of stuff and are surrounded by packing boxes and still don't have a date to move in), stress has me craving for chocolate. I break a 90% chocolate bar into as small a portion as I can, individually wrap in cling form and then get my beloved to put them in different places in the freezer so I have to search for a piece. By the time I've found one let it melt in my mouth I'm too tired to look for another bit. So we will all have found ways to cope, and are happy to share our experiences you will always find someone here to help.
    Please let us know how you are getting on.
     
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  11. Caeseji

    Caeseji Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the tag there @Goonergal much appreciated!

    Now there's a lot of good advice up above already which is coincidentally the same advice that lead to my rather dramatic drops in HBA1C and weight plus just getting my danged life in order. I was diagnosed at 27 myself and I went through this as well and ironically the same tablets too as I had both Januvia and Metformin as part of my treatment plan and both are actually not a part of it now, fancy that!

    First and foremost I would say to get yourself a C-Peptide test because of you being young & underweight it may be just that but we do have members that were thin and almost underweight that ended up becoming T2 because of visceral fat. If you can't put on adipose then your body does tend to get hit with that lovely rock hard fat deposits around your organs really quickly. Best thing is to get a firm diagnosis of what you are first and go from there but low carb helps nearly all types of Diabetes so I would look into it.

    Keep it simple is my advice because I was flapping around worrying about what I can and cannot eat, trying to find recipes for this, that and the other and stressing to the absolute end about getting these things made when what I needed to do? Was go back to basics and just do the lush meat, veg and a bit o' dairy that I'd always done around meal times.

    As for the life expectancy issue, people can look healthy and suddenly pop up with anything. What I say is a lot of these stats are skewed by people that do not look after themselves with a decently clean diet and keep up with their activities plus they don't have anything to live for. I've found through my diagnosis that I looked at what was important to me and the people I love and focused more on them and a little more self-advocacy. There are people that were diagnosed around the same age as us and have lived into their 50's and 60's without even going on insulin or having complications. Life will always throw curveballs but use this as an excuse to look at what you've been doing so far and see what can be improved?

    Always going to be hope there no matter how bleak it is and don't be so hard on yourself okay? I know how it feels but the best you can do for you, your friends and your family? Is keep being yourself and look after yourself with a decently clean diet and keep active but never let your social life suffer but don't subject yourself to what could hurt you either. Your friends and family will understand, mine did and I truly appreciate them for it and keep coming back here! My first year here I was on all the time and it helps, getting the info from some of the kind members on here really went a long way.

    If anything? Taking care of yourself now and putting it firmly in its place will help your future self as the human body is an astoundingly complex but ever adapting machine that will find ways to repair itself if you treat it right.
     
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  12. jordanovich

    jordanovich · Newbie

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    Hello, sorry about the T2, I am taking Januvia and Metformin since 2015.It is good to read the book of Joel Fuhrman "The end of DIABETES" read carefully and trust the author. I hope this book will answer to your questions.
     
  13. Stephen Lewis

    Stephen Lewis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, the genes can get you every time. So remember it's not your fault. Lots of good information and help here but no-one has mentioned exercise. You say you are generally healthy with a good BMI but this may mean that you are not converting unused glucose into fat. The glucose remains in the blood until the kidneys can get rid of it. Not good for the blood or the kidneys. After 12 months on a law carb diet and gym 3 times a week I have lost most of the fat around my waist and liver and I have lost about 40 lbs. I feel good and my bg readings are good and I am hoping for a very low A1c in a few weeks. But I will not kick myself if they are back in the diabetic range. My A1c is always higher in the winter so I'l just keep my diet and exercise going because I know I can beat the genes and at 69 I'm sure there is a long way to go for me so there can be well over 50 more for you.
     
  14. VMK

    VMK · Well-Known Member

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    Yes. I’m a low weight T2. I can keep my BG levels down with LCHF but find it difficult to keep weight on! If I succumb to the carbs My BG soars so I find if I can keep them to below an absolute max of 100g per day, I’m OK. Have brought my HbA1c down to 41 by doing this and hopefully my next one (due Feb) will show I’m maintaining this.....

    Good luck with your journey......
     
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    #14 VMK, Jan 5, 2020 at 5:39 PM
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2020
  15. VMK

    VMK · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry meant HFLC......
     
  16. Auto E

    Auto E Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    isanpspurs - I was reading your signature and wondered if you have shared your story more elsewhere on this forum? You mention managing side effects with LC and your A1C not as low as you'd like - where are you now with your current approach? Thanks for any info.
     
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  17. Auto E

    Auto E Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Ian, do you have a place on the forum where you describe your experiment with the Dave Feldman protocol? I'd like to hear more of your story on that.
     
  18. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    There's an edit button below your post, you can simply change it if you see a mistake. Also a delete button for if you want to delete a post.
    Don't worry, the way you solved the problem is fine too, just wanted to let you know in case it ever comes in handy ;)
     
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  19. Auto E

    Auto E Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Fascinating that your A1C is always higher in the winter! I'd love to hear you expand on this.
     
  20. Stephen Lewis

    Stephen Lewis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    So @Auto E. A few years ago I saw on US Public Broadcasting (like BBC but by donation) a programme that talked about research at Washington State University on bears. They discovered that when bears prepare for hibernation the pancreas (alpha cells?) stops producing insulin. This enables surplus glucose to be converted into fat (by beta cells?) for use during the winter. You may also know that an Inuit often has significant so-called bad fat around the waist that is also available for energy/heating during the winter and I understand that they have a low incidence of diabetes.
    I believe my body (our bodies?) reacts to the lowering temperatures in early autumn by wanting more carbs so that excess glucose is made into fat and is available later. Perhaps a genetic change caused by the latest ice-age(s). However giving into the higher carbs demanded by the body results in higher A1cs. Mine were always higher in late November and late February. However my doctor at the time insisted that I was not a bear;).
    Now through low carb, lots of gym, this forum and prayer at Church I have my running bg into the non-diabetic range (90 day average 5.9), lost 8 inches of my waist and lost 40 lbs in weight.
    Because my last A1c was below 6.5 and trending down my current doctor said she didn't want another A1c until February. Since I seem to have denied my bodies desire for more carbs in the past few months I am hoping to see a further drop in my A1c at the next test in a few weeks. I will you all know.
     
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