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NHS dietitian says no to LCHF?!

Discussion in 'Weight Loss and Dieting' started by VikkiB81, Mar 28, 2020.

  1. VikkiB81

    VikkiB81 · Member

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    OK, so I've been doing LCHF since January, I've lost 2 stone and my Hba1c has gone from 61 to 52. I had a telephone appointment with a dietitian yesterday, as referred by my diabetic nurse. Despite my results she wasn't keen for me to be doing LCHF and said I should move to a mediterranean diet instead. She said that my weight loss and lower Hba1c would have made my body more capable of dealing with some of the healthier carbs. Sadly I haven't been testing my bloods recently so I don't know what they have been doing after meals etc. I tested this morning and it was 8.1. I had some chips last night for the first time since Jan and my blood went from 5.8 to 11.8 (I know chips arent a med diet... Tough times). My question is, has anyone else been told to do this? I super nervous as I'm now in the 11's (11 stone 13) and don't want to be back in the 12's again. Although I wasn't planning to do LCHF forever, I didn't think I would be told to stop. Completely anxious about doing this. Any advise would be appreciated. I don't want to undo all my hard work
     
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  2. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    What diet you choose to follow is your decision. No one can dictate to you what you choose to eat. If you are happy to keep doing Low carb, then carry on!
     
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  3. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    It's standard dietician advice. Your results speak for themselves. LCHF is working for you, it's a pity the dietician didn't congratulate you....so I will

    Very well done ! :D
     
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  4. Geordie_P

    Geordie_P Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Mediterranean diet generally intersects quite well with LCHF anyway. Fish, green vegetables, olive oil etc. Just lay off the pasta and tell the dietician you're doing *Mediterranean*: it will basically be LCHF, but the change in name will be enough to satisfy her dogma, and then she can focus on your improved results instead of losing her mind over your method.
     
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  5. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I tell my nurse I am low carbing. I don't mention fats.

    Most medical people I have come across don't grasp that the "high fat" bit is only proportional to my entire diet, compared to my carb intake.

    So they seem to assume I am eating pack of butter for breakfast, and freak out and stop listening.
     
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  6. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    The Pioppi Diet as champiomed by the Cardiologist Aseeem Malhotra is a LC variant of the Mediterranean diet. Although aimed at people recovering from heart disease, it is suitable for diabetics. I am using a cross pollination amalgam of it with LCHF and find it is workable.
     
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  7. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    She’s a fool not to recognise what works for you and is reiterating her training. It is only very recently that LCHF is being recognised as the powerful tool it is by the medical profession. She just isn’t up to date with that. As well as all the scientific reports supporting this position there’s training modules for nhs doctors, the nhs pay for this sites low carb program in some areas, the American diabetes association this year have agreed it is the most effective way of eating and other national groups tend to follow their lead.

    well done and carry on with your great progress and dont let her scare you.
     
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    #7 HSSS, Mar 28, 2020 at 12:07 PM
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2020
  8. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    You do whatever works for your blood sugars. Besides, there's a bunch of LCHF diets and one of them actually is often referred to as Mediterranean... Just no pasta, spuds or rice in there, but plenty of fish, meat, poultry, olive oil/olives, above ground vegetables... Just the good stuff.

    Two dieticians, one endo and one DN didn't agree with the diet, after they all congratulated me on getting my numbers back to prediabetic within weeks (technically I was in the normal range by then, but the high blood sugars from the previous months still tipped me into the prediabetic range, at 42.). I was told to go back to potatoes, lots and lots of bread, and pasta, even with my HbA1c coming down well over 40 mmol/mol, if not more. The only one who supported me was my GP. But even if she hadn't, I felt so much better. I had energy I lacked before, my rock-hard liver was softening and not hurting, my blood sugars are absolutely fab, and I was losing weight. So... You do whatever is actually good for you. It's your health, your choice.
    Good luck,
    Jo
     
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  9. michita

    michita Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Believe in yourself and the results you see. I’ve seen 3 NHS dieticians but none of them impressed/inspired me..
     
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  10. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    When I was first diagnosed with T2D I had an appointment with the NHS dietitian. She got me to keep a food diary which she pronounced as excellent (similar to Eatwell?) So her solution to my condition was to carry on the same. I have no idea how she expected that to make a difference!
     
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  11. Pipp

    Pipp Type 2 · Expert
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    Some great responses.
    I think part of the problem is many HCPs are sticking to old diktats that have been in place for last 30 years or so, without considering the individual in front of them. Or questioning why the advice they have been told to give has not worked.
    You have found your own way, @VikkiB81 . Don’t be discouraged. You are doing fine.
     
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  12. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Maybe next time just say "no thanks"..

    Edit to add.. you have found your own way of doing things which is working well for you.. you are threatening her very job... ergo..
     
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    #12 bulkbiker, Mar 28, 2020 at 12:39 PM
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2020
  13. TriciaWs

    TriciaWs Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I had one appt with a dietician, who as expected disapproved of low carb - most of them still do in spite of all the research supporting it.
    I declined a follow-up appt.
    Up till now, in addition to my own testing, I've had the regular blood tests via my GP and all is well.
     
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  14. VikkiB81

    VikkiB81 · Member

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    Thank you everyone for your support! The dietitian assumed that my Hba1c had gone down because of medication, she was surprised when I told her it was diet! She quoted the old Live well adage of quarter of a plate lean protein, quarter carb and half veg. I've don't this method so many times and it's not made a bit of difference. You're all right, what I'm doing is working for me and I should continue. I'm going to monitor my bloods again to see what they are doing whilst I'm LCHF and then maybe as one of you suggested do a bit of amalgamation of the med diet and try to introduce beans/legumes... Maybe! Thank you everyone, you've given me a confidence boost to continue on my path
     
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  15. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    That is a totally unbalanced diet - three quarters of it being basically carby food - vegetables can be high carb - and a bit of lean protein so fat is still a poison, I expect - I'd be inclined to ask what is the daily intake of carbs expected, and what Hba1c do other patients achieve on that advice. My blood glucose goes high eating legumes, and it stayed high too, often right through the following day, so they are not to be trusted. I know some people who have the same reaction as myself and others who can eat them in moderation - but they seem problematic.
     
  16. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Are type 2s always asked what they are eating? I don't see why it's anyone's business what diet YOU follow as long as it is keeping you healthy and your results in check. I have never been asked about what I eat, they only talk about what my glucose levels are like and whether my insulin is at the right amount. You are not a child, you do not require an appropriate adult, do what you want. x
     
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  17. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    Tell her / him you are staying on LCHF food as it is working for you, it's your body not there's.
     
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  18. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Cognitive dissonance and very scary, as she is not alone. Those who think the same way have had their way for around 50 years. These are bright people, but cannot see what is front of them, which is like seeing the edge of a cliff and believing you will fly if your walk off it.

    The version of Mediterranean diet would not be Pioppi it, would be exactly as they quote:

    https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/what-is-a-mediterranean-diet/
    "The Mediterranean diet varies by country and region, so it has a range of definitions. But in general, it's high in vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, beans, cereals, grains, fish, and unsaturated fats such as olive oil. It usually includes a low intake of meat and dairy foods."

    NO THANKS
     
  19. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    @VikkiB81 - I'll pass on the advice my DN gave me when she first saw my (low carbing) results: Just keep on doing what you've been doing!

    If you've found an eating style that works for you - just stick with it!

    I've eaten LCHF for over six years now since I was first diagnosed, and will continue to do so indefinitely. I simply work on the basis that I'm somewhat "carbohydrate intolerant" so I'll do my best to avoid as many carbs as it requires to keep my glucose levels down and stable. If I was lactose intolerant I'd avoid lactose, if gluten intolerant I'd avoid gluten, and if I was allergic to peanuts, I'd avoid them like the plague - so I see absolutely no logic in consuming the foods or drinks that cause such issues. I used to be a long term chronic migraine sufferer, some of which were triggered by certain foods/drinks, so I learned in a very hard and painful way to stay well clear of these dietary disasters, and this stood me in good stead when it came to managing my diabetes.

     
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