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Postprandial diabetes

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Elfrizz, Mar 23, 2020.

  1. Elfrizz

    Elfrizz · Member

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    Hi please can anyone help? My daughter has postprandial diabetes controlled by diet, should she be self isolating and off work or not?
     
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  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    That's a new one on me.. what is "postprandial diabetes" please?
     
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  3. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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  4. Elfrizz

    Elfrizz · Member

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    Her body produces too much insulin after eating, for far longer than required, so her blood sugar goes through the floor and makes her really ill or collapse.
     
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  5. Elfrizz

    Elfrizz · Member

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    Yes but the government advice you quoted says everyone who gets a flu jab, and she doesn't, so we don't know whether she has to isolate or not, hence the question
     
  6. Elfrizz

    Elfrizz · Member

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    This guidance says everyone who gets a flu jab, but my daughter doesn't, hence the confusion
     
  7. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That sounds more like reactive hypoglycaemia rather than diabetes to me (I could be wrong).
    In any case diabetics are not currently qualify as a self-isolating group, we are in the higher risk but not self-isolating group, for example. I could not just refuse to go do work on the governments instructions as I don't count as the highest risk group (as it happens I am working from home, but so is 95% of my company now), your daughter may be able to organise something with her work however.
     
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  8. Elfrizz

    Elfrizz · Member

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    She's a shop assistant in the local co-op so she can't work from home
     
  9. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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  10. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    Hi and welcome @Elfrizz

    Does your daughter have Reactive Hypoglycaemia? Or one of the other medical conditions that cause hypos?
    If so, I suggest that she contacts her doctor on the phone and asks their advice.

    I have RH, and I am choosing to identify as being at the same level of risk as someone with diabetes (which means social distancing, rather than self-isolation). I've had no official guidance on this - nor do I expect any. The healthcare profession are very stretched at the moment.
    In the past, swings of blood glucose both up and down to hypo levels meant that I picked up infections and viruses quite easily. Nowadays, with my blood glucose under much better control, my immune system seems to function better too.

    In your daughter's place, I suspect that she would not fit into the self isolating group - because the criteria for that group seems to be people with compromised immune systems whether through chemo, steroids, or disease, but if she needs confirmation then the best thing to do would be for her to have frank conversations with her employer and her doctor, and act accordingly.
     
    #10 Brunneria, Mar 23, 2020 at 3:48 PM
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2020
  11. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Expert

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    Diabetes means blood sugars go high, crashing down isn't a trademark of the condition. I agree with the others, sounds more like Reactive Hypoglycemia. There's actually a solution for that, happens to be the same way you get T2 under control. Her pancreas overreacts not to food, but specifically to carbohydrates. If she cuts those out, it's got nothing to respond to.... So she won't overproduce insulin and thus, not hypo. And yes, I know that's not the question, -that's been answered already anway- but it is a good thing to know all the same. Here, have a read on some of the basics of low carb eating. Might make her life one heck of a lot easier: https://josekalsbeek.blogspot.com/2019/11/the-nutritional-thingy.html
     
  12. sno0opy

    sno0opy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The advice for diabetics is to social distancing not isolation. Since the whole of the UK needs to do this now its pretty much the same for every one.

    There is a list of people who need to isolate but diabetics are not in the list
     
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  13. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I've heard Hypoglycaemia called many things, if your daughter was diagnosed many years ago, it was probably called this by some doctors. Simply because it was high blood glucose levels after eating. Others are postprandial Hypoglycaemia, glucose dumping, idiopathic postprandial diabetes, post prandial syndrome. Idiopathic refers to the cause being unknown. Most Hypoglycaemia causes are now known, so reactive hypoglycaemia is now used for most cases.
    If your daughter is controlled and has no underlying conditions, then she will not be in the ' at risk' group.
    Self distancing, hand washing, using hand cleaner regularly, should be used.

    We do have a sub forum that your daughter will find interesting.
    There is a great deal of knowledge and experience of how we control the condition.

    Keep safe.

    Best wishes
     
  14. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @Elfrizz ,

    Welcome to the forum.

    How old is your daughter, & how long has she had this condition??
     
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