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Prediabetic.

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by David Dp., Jul 13, 2021.

  1. David Dp.

    David Dp. · Member

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    Hi everyone,

    After 2 recent blood tests my doctor telephoned to inform me I am prediabetic.

    I was also told that a Health Coach would contact me, however, I have not heard back from anyone since and have been left not knowing what to do or what I can eat or drink.

    I have tried to check things out myself on via the internet and have read and then re read lots of conflicting advice, mainly on what I should eat and should not eat ....all of which is very confusing.

    I now find myself frightened to eat

    Is there anyone out there who can possibly, please, spare a moment or two in order to enlighten me.

    Best wishes and kind regards,

    David
     
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  2. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi and welcome to the forums.

    I start by stating clearly that I assume you are a borderline Type 2 diabetic who is not yet on any medication!

    The majority of what we eat turns into glucose in the body for use as energy. We (humans) generally eat a lot of carbohydrates and there are 'simple' carb's and 'complex' carb's.

    Simple carb's include sugars and starchy rice. These break down into glucose easily and are readily absorbed by the body. Complex carb's are foods like pasta and bread which take longer to break down. Basic sugars like sucrose, dextrose and fructose (found in fruit) are a problem for us.

    You will benefit from reducing your carb' intake. Bread, pasta, potato and rice are arguably the main culprits but also watch out for a few surprises like certain fruits (bananas apples and pears) that contain fructose. If you like to eat fruit then berries are generally better option.

    Beer may be a bit carb laden and may raise blood glucose but a glass of wine or a shot of harder stuff is less likely to have a major effect. Watch out for mixers though.

    Protein found in meat and eggs takes much longer to break down than carb's. You will find that a bacon and egg breakfast does a lot less harm than a bowl of cereal.

    Think about getting a home blood glucose testing device as it's really the only way of finding out what certain foods do to YOUR bodys' glucose levels as your experience will be different to others.

    Ask more questions - we're here to help.
    Good luck.
    Urb'
     
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    #2 urbanracer, Jul 13, 2021 at 2:29 PM
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2021
  3. David Dp.

    David Dp. · Member

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    Hi Urb,

    Many thanks for your welcome reply.

    Apparently I am borderline (with a bloodtest result of 44) prediabetic and, as yet, definitely not on any medication whatsoever.

    Not at all sure exactly which glucose testing device to purchase, mainly because there are masses amounts advertised at different prices online

    My immediate concerns are what to eat and what not to eat. Is there anything simple to read about telling just how many carbs, fats etc etc, which I can safely eat or drink during one particular day?

    Shopping must be a huge task, trying to add up all different nutrients on all packaged foods etc .is there an easier quicker way to do this Urb ?

    Finally, can I again thank you so very much for writing back to me..I must confess that, at this particular moment in time i feel lost !

    Best wishes and kind regards,


    David.
     
  4. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Not Urb but..
    Once you have figured out what's best for us to eat shopping becomes far easier.
    Ignore anything with more than one ingredient for the most part.
    Meat, fish, eggs, dairy, green veg and berries are best to form the base of your food intake.

    www.dietdoctor.com has some great meal ideas and explanations as to the low carb/keto diet.

    Also have a read of this

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/blog-entry/the-nutritional-thingy.2330/

    As for blood glucose meters the strips are the prciest part so look for strip prices at 50 for £10 ish.

    I use this meter
    https://shop.spirit-health.co.uk/collections/tee2
    Relatively cheap to run and, I have found, pretty accurate.

    @Rachox has some more meter info..
     
  5. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Shopping is quite easy - though when I went to a big Tescos recently I walked a long way and did not find much to buy - so much processed food and baked stuff. My local Lidl is much better.
    I go around the fresh fruit and vege shelves, pick up salad, coleslaw strawberries - I have a whole list of low carb fruit and veges, then along the fresh meat chiller cabinets, cooked meat - where I do need to check the labels for carb content as things change all the time. Cheese mostly low carb so on to eggs, lots of eggs, yoghurt, full fat Greek style, cream, butter - passing all the middle aisles unless I need to get something for my husband, then along the freezers for whatever low carb things they have there and that's it done.
    I do go to Aldi sometimes, and Asda once in a while as they sell a low carb protein bread.
     
  6. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi @David Dp. and welcome to the forum. Thank for the tag @bulkbiker


    Here’s some info on UK meters, and to be clear I have no commercial connections with any of the companies mentioned.


    Home Health have recently bought out the Gluco Navii, but I haven’t heard any reviews yet, links to strips and the meter:

    https://homehealth-uk.com/all-produ...ose-meter-test-strips-choose-mmol-l-or-mg-dl/

    There are also discount codes for when you come to buy more strips - "navii5" and "navii10" will give you 20% off purchases of 5 packs of strips and 25% off 10 packs of strips respectively.


    Disclaimer, I haven’t used the discount codes that I have quoted recently so I don’t know if they are still current.





    Spirit Healthcare have a meter called the Tee2 + found here:



    https://shop.spirit-health.co.uk/co...e2-blood-glucose-meter?variant=19264017268793

    with the strips found here:



    https://shop.spirit-health.co.uk/co...py-of-tee2-test-strips?variant=19264017367097

    Some members have got a free Tee2+ by phoning up to order, with a large order of strips they often throw the meter in for free:

    Phone number 0800 8815423


    With more expensive strips is their Caresens Dual which I currently use, this one has the advantage of glucose and ketone testing in one machine, it’s to be found here:

    https://shop.spirit-health.co.uk/collections/caresens-dual



    If there is a choice of units of measurement then ‘mmol/L’ are the standard units in the UK, ‘mg/dl’ in the US, other countries may vary.


    Don’t forget to check the box if you have pre diabetes or diabetes so you can buy VAT free. (for all meters and strips)
     
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  7. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I use the Navii all the time. I think the bg values it gives are perhaps a bit low, but for me that works best, as if I am seeing bgs that are too high I tend to think I might as well eat some more carbs, whereas low numbers inspire me to keep up the good work. Others may well react differently.
    Yes, the discount codes do work, I used one very recently, and the discount does make quite a difference. I am feeling rather pro Home Health just now as my (quite old) Navii meter stopped showing the correct time, making me wonder if it was also faulty in other ways. I emailed Home Health and they promptly sent me a nice new one, which is working perfectly. I know strips cost much more than meters in the long run, but I was still pleased not to have to pay £9.99 for a new meter, and as far as I know, with the discount the Navii strips are the cheapest on the market.
     
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  8. Randolfus

    Randolfus · Newbie

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    Hi David,
    You've clearly received a lot of advice since your original post.
    Here's a little bit extra from someone in exactly the same position as you, twelve months on....
    I was diagnosed pre-diabetic with a HbA1c of 44 shortly before lockdown. I was also told I'd be contacted to join an NHS programme. To cut a long story short, the invitation came from a private company, not the NHS, so I wasn't too pleased that my details had left the NHS safe haven by default (I'm talking Data Protection here...the NHS is accountable, but the private sector...who knows?) As a UK tax-payer, I wanted 100% NHS support, not a private firm (separate research revealed that the firm concerned had poorly trained staff, with low morale, were actually based overseas, and contracts to supply the service could be switched between providers...so what happened then to all of the personal medical information about me?). I declined the offer, after all being pre-diabetic isn't the end of the world and I think your concern, whilst understandable, should be taken into context. You can, as many have suggested, monitor your intake of foods which are risky for you. If it was necessary for you to buy a blood glucose monitor, I'm sure your GP would have recommended this, but the costs as a pre-diabetic (correct me if I'm mistaken) are yours to bear. As a pre-diabetic, my GP advised me to have annual HbA1c tests (which show the blood glucose levels over a much more meaningful 2-3 month period) whereas a personal electronic device measures your blood glucose only at that point in time, which varies dependent on factors such as when you last ate something. Your pratice nurse can probably explain this in more detail. My advice would be not to panic...as a pre-diabetic, you're not going to suddenly develop awful consequences. Yes, it's a disease nobody would choose to have but managed appropriately, you can remain pre-diabetic and even reverse this. Look up The Blood Sugar Diet by Dr Michael Mosley for tips on healthy eating. In conclusion, yes, life needs a little modification, but you shouldn't be overly anxious and any sensible GP (if you're able to speak to one face to face) should tell you this. Hope this helps.
     
  9. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  10. David Dp.

    David Dp. · Member

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    Hi Randolfus,
    Thank you for your help and advice in this, what I think, is a very complicated matter. I think I will take your advice and I will shelve the blood glucose monitor for the time being and await more news from my GP. Just received a text saying she is calling me 9am next Monday however I still haven't hear from the Health Coach !

    As you have also had a reading of 44 (prediabetic)
    approx 12 months ago, can I ask you if this reading has now altered, is it now higher or lower ?
    Plus how do you intend to cope and manage your future, do you have a plan, or are you optimistic that your current level of 44 will go backwards into remission ? Any more advice for me ?

    I apologise for what you must think are very silly questions, however, this is completely alien to me and has come as a quite a shock.

    Once again, thank you.

    Best wishes and kind regards,

    David.
     
  11. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
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    I am not sure where you are but in the UK GP's do not generally advocate that T2's use a blood glucose meter. To do so would be an admission that the GP should fund it and they don't want the cost burden.

    If your blood glucose is varying between 6 and 10 mmol then your average would be around 8. If your glucose levels were varying between 4 and 12 mmol then your average would still be 8 but in this latter case the magnitude of glucose spikes could be doing greater long term damage.

    The HbA1c test does not provide the whole picture or tell you how much you spike after eating.
     
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  12. Randolfus

    Randolfus · Newbie

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    Hi David,
    Thanks for your acknowledgement. Your questions are certainly not silly.
    I initially had a reading of 44 a few years ago and at that time my GP (who is a friend and very level-headed) advised me not to go into panic mode, as there could have been logical reasons for being higher than ideal, taking other things in context during the months prior to the test (such as an extended period of "not being too careful" and some heavy socialising/events), plus my age (mid 50s at the time) and with a strong family history of Type 2. He advised me to be careful, and to repeat the test in about a year, or sooner if I was anxious (which I was not). I took it upon myself to follow what I could from the Michael Mosely 8 week blood sugar diet (it was difficult for me personally because I simply can't stand most of what are in the recipes - I'd be at home in a 1960s transport cafe if you see what I mean! - but I made the best effort I could). I didn't stick with it because, for whatever reason, it gave me intestinal motility problems which at the time were more serious than being pre-diabetic. (I saw a locum doctor about the gut issues and she confirmed it was most likely due to a change in diet and prescribed medication to help). I had an interim HbA1c done then too and my efforts to eat (and drink) more carefully produced a result of 42. I wasn't prepared to revisit the nightmare of gut problems so I took the decision that, given my lifestyle, as a non-smoker, not being clincially obese (just a few pounds over my ideal weight) my predisposition to Type 2 and access to testing when I request it, I would live with a level of up to 44, and the responsibility for that, and in declining the "group therapy" in the private sector that I was referred to without my informed consent, would be mine. I'm not advocating that you do the same. I'm merely looking objectively at my own risk.

    You asked about my forward plan. I have cut out white bread (I never ate much of it beforehand) and I stick to low G.I. bread from Lidl or their black bread for toast. I mainly drink alcohol free lager (sorry to be pushing Lidl again but theirs suits my palate, no chemical aftertaste) but occasionally have a regular beer if I choose. If I fancy some chocolate, I only ever have the No Added Sugar versions and always sugar-free biscuits. I enjoy croissants occasionally but only ever have a teaspoon of condiments and I mainly stick to Stute (no added sugar) jams available from some supermarkets and chemists (Blackcurrant has the lowest sugar, Cherry has the highest). I cut out sugar in tea and coffee. Porridge is a good low G.I. breakfast. Small trade-offs here and there to maintain a balance and to avoid being totally miserable. I'm also quite physically active which undoubtedly factors into the equation.

    Understanding the biology of how the body uses (and creates) sugar and also the difference between natural sugar and free sugar is a real advantage (e.g. how whole fruit is OK but processed fruit, as a juice, needs moderation). There is a lot of information on the internet about this as well as the plethora of other diseases and problems which relate to full-blown type 2 diabetes and undoubtedly covered in detail in these forum pages.

    I trust my GP and I'm in no doubt that if he saw serious danger signs, he would have given me a stern talking to. I haven't been back for a repeat HbA1c since before the start of lockdown (more because of the pandemic than a lack of desire) but I'll get one done in a month or so and will gladly return to this forum to share the details. I also get regular eye tests and have no signs of diabetic eye disease. I have a home blood glucose tester (given to me) and I tested yesterday (just for your interest!) - I was 4.8 before my dinner and 7.0 about 2 hours afterwards. I'm happy with these, someone else may not be.

    Good luck.
     
  13. SlimLizzy

    SlimLizzy Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi David, you might want to check out the Newly Diagnosed section of the forum for some easy to understand general guidance.
     
  14. zzcanasta

    zzcanasta Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi David,
    For what it's worth, here's my experience. I was diagnosed as Pre-D in 2016. GP told me I'd need to go on statins in near future. I decided instead to read Michael Mosley's 'The 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet' (which I note others have suggested above). If you can't find the book, here's a link to the associated website, which contains most of the same information:
    https://thebloodsugardiet.com/
    I started to change my eating habits as recommended, and within 8 weeks I'd lost 2 stones in weight, my blood sugar was normal and my gout had disappeared.
    Here's the good bit - five years on, my weight is still down, as is my blood sugar, and my other key indicators are normal/good. GP stopped asking me to come in for blood checks 3 years ago. The other encouraging thing is that if I do put on a few pounds - eg after a foreign holiday, say, or just through lack of will on the bread/cake/pasta front - I know that as soon as I resume my normal eating habits the weight is going to come off again. Since the initial weight loss I've only ever put on 5 lbs at most.
    It's really more about changing your former eating/drinking habits than a 'diet' as is generally understood. After a bit, it becomes second nature, and you miss hardly any of the things you used to eat, because - with any luck - your skin will improve, you'll have more energy, you'll sleep better, etc.
    This site is also a real plus, because you'll get lots of really helpful info and tips from the members, which are a lot more use than any number of dodgy YouTube videos...
    Good luck, my friend. I'll happily provide any further info you might want.
     
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  15. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    @David Dp. If you eat a low carb diet, your number should be more normal in a few days- just keep on eating the same way and lots more things will normalise.
     
  16. David Dp.

    David Dp. · Member

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    Can I please thank everyone above for all of their help and advice, what a wonderful set of people !

    THANK YOU ALL !!


    Best wishes and kind regards,


    David.
     
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  17. DanW13

    DanW13 · Well-Known Member

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    You may want to check out the Abbott Libre David, it’s simple to use & gives you continuous measurement of blood sugar which you can get via your mobile phone. No need for daily finger pricking, and get a clear idea of your blood sugar movements day & night.
    I used it when I was diagnosed with PD last year & it provided me with a wealth of useful feedback on my diet.
     
  18. David Dp.

    David Dp. · Member

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    Hi DanW13,

    Thank you for advice, however, I cannot seem to find any apps with that exact name ?

    Please advise.

    Best wishes and kind regards.

    David
     
  19. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
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    Google Freestyle Libre. It is not an application as such. It is glucose sensor that sticks to your arm and is scanned with a dedicated reader or a smartphone (with an app).
     
  20. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    And costs about £50 for 2 weeks
     
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