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Type 1 T1 Diabetics CAN eat sugar

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Emma_Fisher, May 2, 2019.

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  1. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My dad still says the same thing and so to make him more angry, I just pile up my plate with whatever sugary was being offered. You said I can't have it? I'll take double. hehehehe :hilarious:
     
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  2. hh1

    hh1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Emma_Fisher, couldn't agree more with @Bic about the variation in the effect of different foods on different people. There was an interesting study into this in Israel I think, and identical foods can have hugely different effects on peoplein terms of glucose spikes or lack of them. T1 for 30 years here and yes, I bolus for what I eat and what I eat is what I like. Sure, I aim for relatively healthy but that doesn't stop the odd piece of cake/biscuit/chocolate whatever. I really hope you can convince your Mum that you're doing the right thing. And if @Knikki's offering tea & cake I'll come too :)
     
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  3. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Knikki My diabetes is listening, what cake is it? my diabetes is accepting all kinds of cake. :hilarious:
     
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  4. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Emma_Fisher. Welcome to the forum.
    Wow what an entry:):):):). Stick around and you’ll probably figure out who on this thread I agree with and those I don’t.:).
    Going to be honest here......I really don’t care what you eat. The most important thing is knowing that we have a new member who is happy and comfortable with their life.
    Your mother, like most is concerned, old school and a tad uninformed I suspect.
    Each on of us lives with diabetes our own way. We are all different so it stands to reason we will all follow differing regimes.
    I don’t do the restriction, low numbers, minimal risk game.
    I do the I want to make the most of life my way game.
    You obviously seem more than capable at playing the T1 diabetes game and because of that I’m awarding you a “Top Banana “ award.
    P.s Only T1’s know about living with T1 diabetes.
    Daughters birthday cake has just hit, but it was fun sitting around the table eating it with the family.;)
     
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  5. Japes

    Japes LADA · Well-Known Member

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    @Emma_Fisher welcome to the forum! Sorry, I'm late in the day but wanted to add my bit of support as well.

    I've only been dealing with being insulin dependent for the last 15/16 months or so, (and am in my mid-50s), but I do know there would've been a whole extra level of stress in my relationship with my mum if she were still alive over what she would've been saying and doing about food I was eating. (The combination of food, me and mum was always, always complicated and involved many years of emotional stress and mixed messages.) and how hard, if not impossible, it would've been to have the conversation with her about eating what I wanted as long as I got the insulin right.

    I thoroughly enjoy my occasional cake or puddings, have worked out what portion sizes work best for my blood sugars, and am getting to grips with dealing with the numerous people in my life who feel entitled to tell me what I can, can't, should or shouldn't eat.
     
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  6. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I avoid sugar like the plague because I could never get insulinating right for it. But if it works for you, fill yer boots!
     
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  7. db89

    db89 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Since you ask I would walk over hot coals for lemon drizzle with buttercream filling.

    Unless you think the cake is a lie..

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. michita

    michita Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I’m on a low carb diet myself but If you can manage eating sugar/carbs and if you are happy with it then that’s all it matters and that sounds good. Regarding HCPs and what they say personally... I wouldn’t believe everything what they say though .... they don’t have type 1 and their advice could be off... in my view
     
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    #48 michita, May 2, 2019 at 10:49 PM
    Last edited: May 2, 2019
  9. JAT1

    JAT1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Emma, sounds like you are doing a great job managing your diabetes. You have a great attitude as well. You are confident and I am sure whatever physical changes the future has in store for you, you will manage well. You certainly demonstrate excellent skill counting carbs and calculating the insulin dose needed if your numbers are always where they should be. Also glad to hear you beat anorexia. Myself, I stopped all sweets, grains, starches and have limited fruit because no matter how hard I tried with the math, my BS was too erratic. Now on about 90 carbs a day, nearly all from veggies, my bs is finally cooperative.
     
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  10. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    But how long on insulin and what about hypos @WuTwo ?
     
  11. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    A
    and the least dental problems !,,
     
  12. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    I think the generalisation that some are told by their nurse or GP that when on insulin they can eat what they want is not good advice. Some people can eat anything if they cover it with the right insulin amount as long as they are very active etc and don't gain weight. I find I will gain weight or my insulin loses control of the BS if I have too many carbs so I have to keep my carbs at a sensible level. We are all different so when on insulin you need to find what diet approach works for you as long as your BMI remains sensible as well as your BS.
     
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  13. WuTwo

    WuTwo Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Type 1, 15 years and about 1 a month, going down to about 3.00 mmol at the lowest and usually about 3.4 with the very occasional (as in once every three to four months) down as far as 2.8.

    If I hypo it's because I've munched far more than I should. I try to never inject more than 10 units of humalog. If I do have to then the control isn't as good, I admit. Under 10 and it's usually bang on.

    I admit that much to my consultant's frustration I micro-manage my diabetes. I bought myself a half unit humalog pen (because my surgry refused to prescribe half unit pens for adults). I use an excellent app, have four day time ratios programmed into it, and count every gram of carb in every mouthful of food. Micromanagement has it's rewards. And I'm a bookkeeper by trade; I like figures and they aren't a chore to me.
     
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  14. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Emma_Fisher. Interesting thread!
    As a long termer (48 years) I eat sugar, well not straight granulated sugar, but will eat cake, have the odd creme egg etc, as long as you are correctly carb counting and taking the correct amount of insulin then go for it
     
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  15. Dillinger

    Dillinger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'd say don't let perfect be the enemy of good. If having a bit of sugar helps you keep on the straight and narrow diet wise go ahead.

    But, in general I agree with your mum. You should always listen to your mum right?!
     
  16. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Emma_Fisher, another long term T1 here, 49 years of the little passenger.
    Yes, I eat stuff with sugar in but I tend to restrict the amount of icing and marzipan on cake (chocolate’s just one of the favourites here @Knikki, especially ‘naughty chocolate cake’ which is super-chocolaty, rich and crisp on top but soft in the middle. Not much insulin needed for that one either).
    And I steer clear of meringue, cos I’m not fond of it. I know from results that I’ll need to restrict how much sugar-rich stuff I eat without causing spikes and lows.
    What I’m really saying is that like lots have already pointed out, we’re all different, and good luck in your attempts to bring your mother on board with the way you manage T1. Our older daughter had a phase of anorexia and it was extremely worrying for us. She’s left it a few years behind her now and munches cake with the rest of us. She’s not T1.
    It’s still hard to stop worrying about her though, but I try not to show it. I hope your mother will find it easier as time goes on and that your vibrant good health will persuade her that you’re more than ok.
     
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  17. endocrinegremlin

    endocrinegremlin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You summed it up yourself. Moderation, count the carbs/sugar and away you go.
     
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  18. smw99

    smw99 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It's what I read about the impact of sugar on gut bacteria that makes me not want to eat it whether diabetic or not. And gut bacteria look like they impact on every aspect of our health, both physical and mental. Read Tim Spector, his advice is feed your gut bacteria with as many different foods as possible and different types of fibre. They don't like sugar!
     
  19. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I do all of that :)
     
  20. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well done @Emma_Fisher for getting your anorexia under control at the same time as being a type 1. Huge respect! Everything in moderation should help with your continued success. Your mum must be proud of you too, and perhaps concerned about your diabetes also, which makes her react as she does. Believe me when you are a mum you have more concern for your children than you do for yourself.
    These threads that degenerate into a carb v no carb and cake v no cake both amuse and frustrate me. At the end of the day we are all individual and should make our own decisions about which course of action to follow. We are here to support each other and make suggestions, but surely not make people feel bad. I am 60 this year and have also seen a few things. However, I am not too old to learn from the younger generation. Yes you may have had diabetes for years and will have many pearls of wisdom, but diabetes management has changed and will continue to do so. My brother 33 years ahead of me as a Type 1 hasn’t taken on board some of the up to date thinking, managing things very differently to me, but does very well and has no issues. He has been living his life and enjoying it too, which is what we are all here to do surely.
    I understand also that type 2s have a whole new ball game to manage and a strict diet works very well. However, there are lots of people in the world eating a dreadful diet that won’t become diabetic. Some Type 1s may also become insulin resistant too. Many will not.
    Making people feel bad for being human and enjoying some cake is not the way to go guys. That is not a supportive community.
     
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