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Type 1 diabetes rant :). ( revised title ). DIABETES RANT.

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Anaelena, May 29, 2015.

  1. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    I do actually empathise with t2's as I think its harder to control on diets/tablets and limited strips.

    Just don't think sometimes that anybody outside the T1 (or T2 injectables) exclusive club really understand how insensitive some remarks are.
     
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  2. satindoll

    satindoll Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My empathies lie with all diabetics of all types, all ages, all sizes, all colours and it matters not how or why they got it, diabetes is a rotten disease and no one deserves to have it.
    If the only other thing in your life you have to worry about are stupid people making stupid comments then you have a good life, as I said to a young lad at the local nursery who was upset by some of the other children, hold your head high and tell them to bog off and mind their own business.
     
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  3. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Love it!!-lol!! Hugs!!
     
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  4. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Thanks @satindoll.. Good realusation that I have a "good life".. Needed that!! Thank you...

    A stupid comment from a NHS chiropodist in South Wales. " you must have been really bad in your previous life. You would have been given a learning book for this life and had to select 5 illnesses to have to teach you to be a better person in your life after this one".

    Hey.... I'm having a good life now!!! I was up to 4 diseases...

    1) diabetes
    2) palindromic rheumatism
    3) pernicious anaemia
    4) fibromyalgia

    latter undiagnosed - the NHS Chiropodist wouldn't be able to explain that!!

    Thank you for reminding me of having a "good life"
     
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  5. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I'm saying nothing, I haven't been here!:angelic:



    A few of them apply to me as well!:oops::rolleyes:
     
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  6. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I live a very sheltered life as very rarely had comments about having diabetes from the general public.
    Only ignorant comments have come from the medical profession. "oh you look to old to be type 1" is the normal comment.

    Balancing things out though, how many forum members actually knew anything about diabetes before they were diagnosed themselves?
     
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  7. June_C

    June_C Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    Me? Zilch.........................
     
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  8. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Well, I think everyone's personal experiences will differ to an extent, and past experience, reading on here tells me that one of the things that really gets up people's noses is tagging their own brand of D to the "other" sort. As a T2, controlled by D&E, of the few people I have told, I get irritated when declining some deliciously carb-tasting, sugar-laden morsel, I am asked, surely you can just have an injection and get on with it. That's what my friend/grandson/neighbour does.

    I don't like labels, and as such I have kept my diabetic status very quiet, with all but those closest to me. I like to be known as AB; not AB, she has diabetes you know.

    DD - I do hope that rant of yours wasn't directed at me.

    I have often said how fortunate I am to have been diagnosed with T2, as opposed to T1; not to mention how fortunate I have been to have been able to manage things, successfully by diet and exercise. But, whatever you do, don't think that I haven't had to make any effort to achieve that status quo. But the fact I think I am lucky is a fact, and it stands. Of course I have no idea what it is like living with T1, but then I'm sure you have no idea what it's like living with some of the challenges others do. If we want to get into a who's worse off than whom, willy waving contest, I doubt you or I would be close to winning. I thank my lucky starts on that.

    Why are we getting into this sort of self-pitying, argumentative mindset when most of us have so much to be thankful for. We could be diabetics in third world countries where drugs are too expensive and decent nutritions food is beyond most of our pockets. But, on the upside, at least we wouldn't feel we were missing out on our doughnuts and thrice cooked chips. And we'd have the benefit of a multi-mile walk each day to collect water to account for our exercise quota.

    [ / Rant of my own off]
     
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  9. Anaelena

    Anaelena Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I cannot believe that we are in a position that we need to explain that we are different and have our own hardships.

    Let me say this.. I am on a pump and travel a lot. The insulin that I use is a fast acting short lived type . I was on an international flight ( 8 hours) I made a huge mistake and did not bring extra supplies with me on board... Thinking oh what can happen?? Well, what happened was my tubing got stuck on a seat and was pulled out. Do you know the feeling of knowing that what is keeping you alive is no longer working ? Do you know the term pulling the plug ? Well this applied. As I sat there in my seat thinking I have another 6 hours to go . I have maybe another two hours of active insulin. What do I do ?? I started sweating , urinating, and drinking so much that the steward noticed and asked if I was okay . I explained ... They had one syringe on the plane . After 3 hrs my sugar was 580 . I was able to get insulin from my pump. Of course I learned a huge lesson and realized that one stupid mistake can cost me my life . The purpose for telling you this ??? We are different type 2s. It is not about who suffers more , it is not a competition. It is just living. We live our lives on a balance. I could of been in a acidosis coma after a few more hours . I do not believe as a type 2 you would go into a coma after a few hours .high sugars maybe . But your body still produces insulin. Mine does not . TYPE 1 diabetics cannot live with out insulin, type 2s can. ,
     
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    #29 Anaelena, May 30, 2015 at 7:19 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 30, 2015
  10. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Hi Pipp. No-one is saying that people with Type 2 aren't subject to ignorant or offensive remarks, but I took the OP's post as a comment on things people say to TYPE 1s (because the OP is Type 1). I don't think they left out people with Type 2 to disrespect them or devalue their experiences. All they were doing was explaining things that annoyed them as a Type 1.

    For me too, it is annoying to have members of the general public think they know all about diabetes when what they actually think they know is about Type 2. Imagine if it was the other way round and Type 1 was the prevalent type, yet you had Type 2 that you were treating by tablets and low carbing, then someone tells you you should be having injections and that's where you're going wrong, and their friend's cousin's husband has diabetes and they can eat bread so why aren't you, etc, etc.

    Obviously, people will still say cretinous and upsetting things to Type 2s but but this thread wasn't about that. I think it's fair enough for people to moan about their particular type of diabetes and I'd be interested to read a simlar thread about Type 2.
     
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  11. satindoll

    satindoll Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If I miss my injection I can go from a respectable 5.0 to an unknown number as the meter just said HI in 2 hours, and my meter registers upto 24mmol so acidosis is not out of the question.

    And yes I do know how it feels when the meds stop working and you know its only a short time before you are like to kick the proverbial bucket, thanks. been there and survived.
     
    #31 satindoll, May 30, 2015 at 7:27 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 30, 2015
  12. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    It's sad that the OP felt they had to edit their post. We're all 'in the same club' but it's not wrong or inappropriate to sometimes talk only about our own type of diabetes. Doing that in no way negates the experience of people with other types of diabetes.
     
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  13. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    @AndBreathe.. It was a T1 rant... Not directed at you or anybody else....lol!!

    It was an airing of just how **** sometimes it is just getting out of bed really!! Especially worse for me in mornings because I have paralysis feelings that are being investigated.

    Just a rant in general!!! Off chest now!! (What chest??!!). I said previously in lots of posts elsewhere that I think T1 is easolier to live with food choices than a T2 as with correct insulin etc we can eat what we want if we so wish without worry.... I do have complete empathy with the frustrations of persons that can't get strips, having to balance diets etc... Totally... I don't normally rant as I think T2 is just as bad for an illness.

    Just incidentally.. Should have added on though...

    -have my levels changed during the night?
    - do I need to change any basals?
    -am I hypo or hyper now

    (lol!!) probably snother dozen I could think of!!!

    Not directed at any specific person. Just a T1 rant!!!!
     
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  14. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I've tried so hard to not say anything here.
    I have RH, and I am so lucky not to have T1,T2, 1.5, Lada etc.
    I am also blessed not to have diabetes, unlike my brother, who died 7 years ago of heart failure.
    My uncle had it, the wife has it, the father in law has it, and yes I do know what it is like to be treated by friends, colleagues, acquaintances, enemies, doctors, dsn's, specialists(!!!). Who thought because I had been diagnosed with diabetes, that I should be doing this, that and the other!

    Since diagnosis, I get, so you are diabetic!
    You need insulin!
    You need to eat properly!
    What, meat and salad only?
    What happens if you are ill?
    My god, never heard of it!
    What drugs are you on to treat it?
    What drugs do you need to eat properly?
    Go on, have a pint!
    So no spuds?
    What do you have to eat in a restaurant?
    The chippie is out then!
    If you have an Indian, what do you eat?
    I was having a hypo in hospital and the senior diabetic sister made me have a bottle of lucozade!
    Why do you need a necklace, that says that?

    Need I go on.

    As a Reactive Hypoglycaemiac, I thank whoever, that I don't have diabetes!

    But,

    In my diet, I can't bolus for carbs, I can't use insulin for the day! (I apologise for probably getting it wrong!)
    That's how difficult and different we all are!

    I have no choice but to eat seven small meals a day, very, very low carb, because if I don't, well I've been there once, and I'm not going back.

    Someone who posts, has a signature that goes something like this.
    Be thankful for what you have, it can get worse!
     
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    #34 Lamont D, May 30, 2015 at 7:49 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 30, 2015
  15. Pipp

    Pipp Type 2 · Expert
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    For the record, I don't feel inferior. That is despite the negative reports in the media, and some people with T1 making disparaging remarks regarding those of us with T2.

    I did have a lot of negative things said and done to me as a child. As a child it hurt and confused me. As 'an older person' I can ignore the opinions of people who have the thickness of their underwear muffle the sound of their voices.

    For the OP, and those who have the daily challenge of any illness, disability, or impairment, I empathise. I too know what it is like to have life limiting conditions. If you really did not mean to offend, then all is well with me. I hope you continue to remain as well as you can, and not let your T1 get you down.
     
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  16. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Another thing to add to list of pro and cons with pumping!!!-lol

    We are not "self pitying"as "satindoll" put it. We are just expressing things that other people never have to think about....(ok, injecting T2's would) and how damn frustrating it can be...."self pitying" is along the lines of other comments by people that just do not have the realisation of what it is like to have to plan every day life besides everyday living.....

    Annoying if on a plane as this happens!!! I've pulled out sets accidentally in awkward places and because in my backside under lycra tight clothing I have managed to put them back in secured by my knicker and skorrs or leggings long enough to get home.. But never on a plane. Will remember your experience though.

    Living everyday is great, but planning life everyday is not the same...
     
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  17. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    @Anaelena

    Thank you for posting this. I know you are newish to our forums.. So a warm welcome from me.

    It is really hard as a child with T1 and parents, friends and family... And wanting to be "normal".

    Knowing at the moment -you have to have injections/pumps/testing etc for the forseeable future and adults telling children they know best etc... It is hard...

    Some adults have been heard to say "at least they haven't had 30 years of sweets to get used to.... "

    I think you have created a very interesting post...
     
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  18. satindoll

    satindoll Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  19. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Frankly, that's the kind of comment that results in something nasty and cutting being mentioned by me. If someone says that to me, normal response is usually along the lines of "Can't have been as bad as you though, I mean, who would choose to come back looking like that?"

    If people are insensitive I find that making equally insensitive comments back about something they have no control over hammers home the point that they might want to consider what they say.
     
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  20. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    At the time I was in the air and having nails done with very sharp clippers!! Thought it best not to throw any comment back!!! (Surprising for me!)

    I should have actually complained as these comments could have been made to a vulnerable person.... And not someone who took it with a pinch of salt....

    Stuck in my memory for past 6 years though and will never be forgotten....
     
    #40 donnellysdogs, May 30, 2015 at 8:42 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 30, 2015
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