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A Burden on the NHS - Type 2's

Discussion in 'Diabetes Soapbox - Have Your Say' started by lucylocket61, Jun 17, 2012.

  1. paul-1976

    paul-1976 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    +100 to that! It's a real battle but never give up and keep yourself armed with information(as you do already) as unbeliever rightly says...Don't give up.
     
  2. pickledpepper2

    pickledpepper2 · Well-Known Member

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    Burden!

    I'm a T2 and I'm not overweight, and I don't take medicines at the moment. If anyone has been a burden, it has been the NHS with their shoddy diet advice and general cluelessness about the whole condition.
     
  3. paul-1976

    paul-1976 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree totally..i may not be T2 but this shocking blame culture towards T2's that they somehow.."Stuffed their face with sweets and doughnuts" disgusts me to the core and I agree with the **** diet advice that is peddled..their advice is the equivalent of treating coeliac
    disease with a diet filled with gluten or treating alcoholism with whisky.
     
  4. sparkyrich

    sparkyrich · Well-Known Member

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    I'm T2, very overweight but also active and (diabetes and arthritis aside) fairly fit and healthy. I'm also getting pretty fed up of the ignorant press and the sheep who believe every biased word printed or broadcast to make money. I'm even more fed up of the self styled diabetic gurus on here who should have more sense than to point a finger at fellow sufferers of this vile disease. T1, T2, T1.5, whatever. They're all part of the same problem and trying to score points off each other is pitiful. Therefore, either hold your tongues or I'm gonna come and sit on you and show you once and for all what obesity feels like!


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  5. paul-1976

    paul-1976 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sparky..I'm sorry if some people have made you feel bad on here..I just want to say as a T1 that I hate any prejudice or stereotype about T2 diabetes..we ALL face the same risks with high BG's and possible REAL complications whether T1,T1.5,T2,T3 etc..we ALL are equal in our fight as far as I'm concerned.
     
  6. mo1905

    mo1905 Type 1 · BANNED

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    Well said ! Love it !


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  7. hornplayer

    hornplayer · Well-Known Member

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    DITTO!!!! :)


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  8. AnnaBanana

    AnnaBanana · Member

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    You believe that because some people overeat and become obese, the FSA should do something about the junk food and additives? Sorry, but we ALL know what a healthy diet is. We KNOW that too much fat or sugar will make us ill. I don't want my rare treats taken away just because some people have no self control!!
     
  9. Thommothebear

    Thommothebear Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    But do we all know what a healthy diet is? The so called NHS healthy diet I was following for years turned out to be anything but healthy. I only put on weight after I went on that diet and I only lost it again when I went low carb
     
  10. pickledpepper2

    pickledpepper2 · Well-Known Member

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    I visited a relative in Whipps Cross hospital and was horrified at the diet being given to some poor diabetic fellow on the opposite bed whose levels were sky high! They were giving him white bread sandwiches, rice, potatoes and whatnot! And this in a hospital!!

    When I slyly queried the nurse regarding acceptable bs figures, she said she had been told anything under 10!!!! Good grief!

    And this in a hospital no less!!

    Lord have mercy!
     
  11. LittleWolf

    LittleWolf · Well-Known Member

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    From 2 GPs and every hospital documentary, I've heard paramedics quote that 'normal' blood sugar is 4-10.

    No wonder people deteriorate or go undiagnosed if a random 10 is not treated with any suspicion and that poor patient must have felt rotten.


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  12. janeecee

    janeecee Other · Well-Known Member

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    I was told by my practice nurse that under 10 at +2 hours postprandial was the target she advises patients to aim for, but evidence shows damage begins at 7.8 and even NICE suggest <8.5 for T2s. I suppose the paramedics are looking at emergencies and not the day-to-day management of blood glucose levels, so I can sort of go along with that in the context of an emergency, but as for the rubbish my practice nurse came out with… And she runs the diabetic clinic!


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  13. mpe

    mpe · Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Which is associated with insulin resistance.

    Some of what's involved might appear to be counter-intuitive. What is typically measured as "triglycerides" are fats made in the liver, rather than dietary fats. A more likely source of such fats is excess sugars. With fructose and galactose being only converted to fat by the liver. (Also NAFLD appears to be linked to excess fructose consumption.) Glucose can be converted to fat by either the liver or fat cells, in both cases insulin being needed. Insulin resistance means that the amount of glucose which can actually be used is reduced.
     
  14. mpe

    mpe · Well-Known Member

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    It's far from clear what a "healthy diet" might actually be. It isn't even likely that there is one diet which suites everyone in the first place. In the most extreme case if someone is intolerant (or allergic) to something eating a diet containing it is likely to be unhealthy (possibly life threatening).
    It also makes little sense to go on about "sugar" whilst encouraging the consumption of "starchy foods". When the latter contain more glucose than the latter. (Wonder if there's any "junk food" which is not high carbohydrate.)
     
  15. Yorksman

    Yorksman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Would you believe that mine said not to worry unless they rose to something like 15 or 16?

    There are some funny ideas out there.

    It's quite clear that whereas I want to do something about it, they are happy just to try and contain it. The idea that decline is inevitable has become a self fullfilling prophecy for some of them.
     
  16. GPN

    GPN Type 2 · Newbie

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    This is the first time I have posted but all this !!!! got up my nose.
    I developed Type 2 Diabetes during Radio Therapy for Breast Cancer at the age of 60 when the
    whole of my body system said "I'm going to play up if you treat me like this, so it did!". :crazy:
    I have coped well for 8 years until a "Jobsworthy" Diabetes Nurse poop pooped my treatment etc.
    People need to get educated not just News Papers but the Health so called Professionals too.
    Its about time we Diabetics were not just made a scape goat and blamed about costs
    for all the ills that are wrong with the NHS etc.
    Had my say :silent:
    GPN.
     
  17. Paul_c

    Paul_c Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Pork Scratchings (Pork Rinds for the USAnians) :)
     
  18. Luna21

    Luna21 · Guest

    I have other health issues and I'm on a drug called methotrexate which has very nasty side effects, one of which made my ALT (liver enzyme levels) shoot up so high I was taken off the drug for several months and given a liver scan. I had fatty liver disease which can be a complication of my condition.
    Since becoming diabetic, although I thought my diet was really fairly healthy, I have drastically cut down on sugars and carbs, resulting in weight loss, and more importantly a huge lowering of my ALT into the now almost normal zone, and my cholesterol has dropped to 3.4 as well. I do take statins though. My doctor is delighted as statins can increase your liver enzymes too.

    However what I really wanted to say is that because I get blood tests every month, I have watched my liver levels drop consistently month upon month as I stuck to the lower carb diet. (I can eat a small amount of carbs.) This proves that lowering your carbs and sugars is the way to go to keep your liver healthy. I eat roughly about the same amount of fats than I did before, though I am more careful in what I choose now.

    I'm convinced that it's sugar and carbs that are the problem, but as yet, I'm not fully sure that I want to eat more fats.
     
  19. Geocacher

    Geocacher · Well-Known Member

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    Here's a little something to think about...

    Those of you who were pregnant in the between 1940 and 1970 may know of a drug called Diethylstilbestrol (DES). It is a synthetic form of oestrogen that was given to pregnant women because it was thought to prevent miscarriage. Many women didn't even know they were given it because it was routinely given as part of a prenatal 'vitamin' injection in both the US and UK.

    And babies were born that looked normal and healthy with the exception of an increase in hypospadia in boys. Years later when the girls born of Mother's given DES (DES daughters) were becoming pregnant it was found that the drug had caused changes in the uterus of those girls that resulted in difficulty conceiving, an increased risk of miscarriage, and an increased risk of a rare form of uterine cancer, and an increased risk of breast cancer. That resulted in a class action suit in the USA and banning of the drug for use in humans. It continued to be used in vetrinary medicine and is still in limited use to this day.

    What they didn't know at that time was that DES was a systemic teratogen that caused epigentic changes to the endocrin systems of both the Mothers and babies which are still being found in fourth and fifth generation offspring of the babies born to Mothers who were given DES. In mice epigenetic changes have been shown to last eight generations or more before they start to resolve.

    The effects of DES on the reproductive system have long been known, more recent studies have shown that another of the effects of DES is adult onset obesity. It is also suspected that there is a link to Type 2 diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), and hyperprolactinemia/prolactinoma.

    What is scary about all of this is that DES continued to be used in vetrinary medicine for another 25 years after it was banned for human use. It was used to increase milk production in dairy cattle and was present in the milk from those cows but thought to be at a harmless level. Everyone who consumed milk during the years it was used in the dairy industry has been exposed to DES and may have acquired the same epigenetic changes and Mothers and babies exposed to DES and will have passed those genetic changes to their children. And being a synthetic version of oestrogen, DES doesn't break down as easily in the environment as natural oestrogen. It has been found in lakes and rivers in detectable amounts, no doubt from the use of manure as fertiliser and the resulting runoff.

    It's entirely possible that we are not eating ourselves to death because of junk food and inactivity, but rather because of something that was thought to be a beneficial medication that turned out to a liability that will last for generations. DES is just one of many possible known factors that are contributing in some way to the so called obesity epidemic and increase in T2 diabetes.

    At the end of it all, I am a DES daughter and I have PCOS, hyperprolactinemia, and T2 diabetes. I am the fourth generation of my family to be a T2 so I don't think that DES is entirely to blame for that, but I do think it has complicated the condition. As a result of that genetic history I have chosen not to have children so that I don't pass that burden on to another generation. All I can do is live with what I have and that means that what is a normal healthy diet for anyone else is not a healthy diet for me.
     
  20. raymond123

    raymond123 · Member

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    i feel the same about the propoganda of not visiting A and E although the last time i had 2 heart attacks.
     
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