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Confused with diagnosis please help !

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by HazieB, Oct 25, 2020.

  1. HazieB

    HazieB Type 2 · Newbie

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    Appreciate any help with this. Had a routine thyroid blood test (been hypo for years) GP also did a test for diabetes apparently at same time ...not told until she rang and said it’s 6.6 so repeat in 2 weeks. Second result was 6.5. Shortish call saying you’re diabetic. Have no symptoms! Chlorestral bit high but has been prev. Scared me stiff saying about all the problems diabetes can cause. Refused meds as I am not happy with handling of this. I am 3 stone overweight so I’ve asked for another test in three months rather than the 12 she suggested. GP said you can’t change the diagnosis by losing weight you’ll always be diabetic now.
    A friend said they had 6 weeks between tests not 2 weeks? Can’t see any NICE guidelines
    Should I buy a meter & test strips?
    Thanks for any help I’m feeling very anxious it’s difficult speaking over the phone to GP as I have hearing loss.
     
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  2. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi and welcome. It sounds like the GP did an HBA1C test with the result in old money (%). This test would be done by drawing blood from the arm and sending it to the lab for testing. Normally this would be done again in 3 months. The reading is quite good so don't panic. Moving to a low-carb diet should move your blood sugar back down again without meds. Look for NICE diabetes guidelines on the web.
     
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  3. TriciaWs

    TriciaWs Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Luckily for you your GP has offered out of date information. Thousands of people get their T2 diabetes into remission.
    Unluckily it sounds as if your GP might not be much help with this.
    Many of us decide to do low carb instead of drugs, or with a lower level of drugs. It seems that the earlier you start the better your chance of getting into remission.
    Someone should provide links to the basic info soon.
     
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  4. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Losing even a little bit of weight helps bring down your numbers. Definitely get a meter and start testing so you can tell how much your blood sugars are changing and what they are doing in response to eating and exercise. Your numbers aren't horrible, just not normal either. Losing weight, exercise and a change in what you eat should make a big difference! Exercise is a huge help to controlling your blood sugars, walks after meals type thing helps. Good luck!!
     
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  5. MarkMunday

    MarkMunday Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That test measures blood glucose over the last three months. The second test was just to confirm the diagnosis.
     
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  6. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    For my diagnosis I had two tests close together - the second was purely for confirmation. Routine HbA1C checks will initially be a minimum of 3 months apart, mine are now annual.
     
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  7. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, as long as you don't have a tendency to eating disorders or obsessing too anxiously over your health. Having your own meter puts you back in control. Much better than waiting around for your GP to order you another A1c test.

    There are several ways to test for diabetes, or glucose intolerance. The A1c is only one of them. It is helpful in that it reflects your blood glucose levels over an extended period, so will not be affected by what you had for breakfast. (How extended depends on the individual, as the result shows the amount of glucose adhering to your red blood cells. Some of us have a faster turnover of red blood cells than others, which affects the results. Being anaemic can really mess up the test.) The A1c test has two other downsides. One is that it is an average. The same average figure could be composed of unhealthy highs and lows, or a much healthier flat line. In the world of T1 diabetes patients are more and more encouraged to aim for a certain time within a certain range rather than a certain A1c.

    Another drawback of the A1c test is that, like all diabetes tests, it is inaccurate. If blood drawn at the same time from the same patient is sent to two different labs, it is very likely that 2 different results will come back. Similarly, if you get a meter, you can drive yourself crazy by testing over and over with different strips only to get a different result each time. This does not mean diabetes tests are worthless, but neither should they be seen as precise.

    Once you have a meter I suggest you test each day on rising and before consuming anything except water, and record your findings. This may be useful to show your GP. You will also be able to monitor your reaction to certain foods and maybe to exercise. I'm sure others will advise on this.

    Monitors are not very dear, but strips are an ongoing expense which adds up. The monitors with the cheapest strips that I know of are only available on the internet.

    I use the Gluconavii: https://homehealth-uk.com/all-products/gluconavii-blood-sugar-meter-glucose-monitor-starter-kit/
    If you decide that testing is for you, you can buy replacement strips at a discount if you buy 5 tubs at once and quote the code navii5. (Or 10 tubs and quote navii10.)

    @Rachox gives useful info on meters and strips here: https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/advice.177197/#post-2314801

    Good luck! Although finding one has a problem with glucose intolerance is a nasty shock, knowing is so much better than not.
     
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  8. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi HazieB and welcome to the forum.

    Even the NHS believes that it is possible to put t2 Diabetes into remission by losing weight. Many in here believe ti is possible without losing weight provided the patient turns to a Low Carb way of eating.
    There is evidence from Bariatric surgery that Blood Glucose drops long before any noticeable weight is lost.

    However there is a certain amount of truth that you will always need to watch what you eat - so in that respect you will always be diabetic.

    If you want to try to gain remission from T2Diabetes the easiest way (LCHF) and you can handle the cost and the finger pricking before and then 2hrs after meals for a few weeks, then yes it's a darned good idea to buy a BG meter. Both the Spirit Tee2 and the SD Gluco Navii have cheapish test strips of which you will need a lot at first.

    Here is a link to Jo's Nutritional thingy which explains (almost) everything:
    https://josekalsbeek.blogspot.com/2019/11/the-nutritional-thingy.html
     
  9. RosieMaxwell

    RosieMaxwell Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    What an idiotic thing for the GP to say. Well I’m here to say OP that you most certainly can achieve something by losing weight. Putting diabetes into remission is entirely possible through diet.

    I was diagnosed as pre-diabetic in Feb but have been doing low carb/keto since. 6 months later, A1c was normal.
     
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  10. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    HazieB - Welcome.

    The first thing I would say is, don't panic about this. Yes, the diagnosis is a right, royal pain, but it isn't the end of the world.

    Your diagnostic readings are literally, just on the line, so you are starting from a very promising place, in terms of the future.

    As others have suggested, what you eat and drink is critical for those living with T2 diabetes - especially those who want to avoid meds, where possible.

    My diagnostic reading was 73, or 8.8, so a good deal higher than yours. Like you, I didn't want meds, so went away, and like you, I did my research. Myt next test, almost 4 months later (I was away for the time between my diagnosis and follow up test, but that's another story, I'll spare you!), my readings had decreased to 37 or 5.5. Since then, my A1c tests have all been lower still.

    To do that, I modified my diet, and bought myself a blood glucose meter. I used the meter as my guide.

    I would test my blood glucose, then eat my meal, then test again 2 hours later. If the second result was more than 2.0 more than the first, that meal wasn't doing me any favours, so I would look at the elements in it and decide which of the carbs would likely be the culprits, then decide if I would eat less of those next time, or just not repeat eating that thing again.

    By doing that, I soon got to know what impacted my blood glucose and I had some strong pointers for ongoing management.

    Most, if not all of us with T2 need to trim back on the carbohydrates we eat. It's not just the sugar, as all carbs turn to sugar as they are digested. Some faster than others. The other annoying thing is some folks can eat, say bread, but not potatoes, and others will be the opposite, so it is a very personal thing. That's why the meter helps so much.

    I wasn't carrying a lot of weight when diagnosed, but I did have love handles. I never set out to lose weight, thinking I'd rather have great sugars and love handles than be skinny and have rampant blood sugar numbers I need to then get under control. The reality was that by following my meter, I got very slim along the way.

    Take it steady, and try to find a simple approach to all this. Don't over think it, or you'll end up confused by what's going on.

    My suggestions would be to buy yourself a meter and a few pots of strips. (The one Alexandra mentions above is fine, and the strips are very tightly priced, by comparison to many. As you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you do not pay VAT on the meter or strips.)

    Post lots of questions. That's how we all started out. You'll be fine - just don't panic!

    On the other front, how well is your thyroid managed? Getting that into a good place will help with your T2. Hormone imbalances are complicated things, for sure.

    (I and many others on the forum also live with hypothyroidism of one sort or another.)
     
  11. Lilylala

    Lilylala · Well-Known Member

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    Hi the Doctor was talking total nonsense that you will always be like this , I myself a T2 and on insulin have since February been doing one meal a day and lost 3 stone and now on my 9 th day taking no insulin and getting normal blood glucose readings you can turn your life around , you can trust me I have achieved the weight loss eating my favourite foods and no exercise , so if I can be in remission im sure anyone can
     
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  12. Zoe Sparks

    Zoe Sparks Type 2 · BANNED

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    That is true! It is all about the regime. I always try to keep up with the following:
    • Regular meals and small portions. I always keep my blood sugar levels at bay, eating frequent, smaller meals, drink enough water each day.
    • Low-carb balanced diet. I have increased number of unprocessed foods, including vegetables and whole grains and reduced the amounts of high-fat or sugary foods and drinks.
    • Daily workouts. Dedicate at least 30 minutes per day to working out. Sometimes I go to gym, sometimes just for a walk or gardening. As long as the heart rate is up, I am doing great.
    • Controlled stress. I used to have a lot of stress, eat irregularly and different size portions each time. Meditation exercises helped to reduce stress and anxiety, I am more focused while eating and controlling my regime.
    • High-quality sleep!! Rest is necessary to manage diabetes because digestive tract has enough time to digest the food and stabilise body processes, so I always try to assure I get at least 8 hours sleep.
     
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