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Diagnosed, but not really. So confused.

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by DMWinter88, Oct 18, 2021.

  1. DMWinter88

    DMWinter88 Type 2 · Member

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    Hi all. Forgive me if this comes across as a little melodramatic. I'm just having a very low moment (mood, not blood sugar.)

    I was sent for a blood test, and the result came back that I was type 2 diabetic, but only just. If the HbA1c threshold is 48, then I was 49. The nurse who called me to deliver the result said that I would need a second test to be officially diagnosed, and I should try to lose some weight and get my number down before then so I can avoid diagnosis.

    So, I've gotten myself a blood sugar monitor, and I've been doing low carb. But I just feel so stuck in limbo. I wish I had just been diagnosed there and then, because what happens if I go back and I've gotten the number down? I won't be diagnosed... so what does that mean? I'm not diabetic? Because surely my body will still think I am? Does it mean I can start eating carbs again (in moderation this time.)

    I just have so many questions, half of which I struggle to even articulate because I've been given no support or information at all. I try and read through this forum, but feel lost as I'm not sure what does apply to me and what doesn't.

    Has anyone else been in this situation? If so, what did you do?
     
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  2. catinahat

    catinahat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The reason they have 2 HbA1c tests is to confirm the accuracy of the 1st one. Your 1st test was only just over the diabetic threshold so with your change in diet I wouldn't be surprised if the second one puts you into the non diabetic or pre diabetic range. Whatever your eventual diagnosis it looks pretty certain that you are having trouble handling carbs. Although they will tell you that you don't need to test your glucose levels if you get yourself a meter and test before and 2 hours after meals, you will soon see what you need to cut down or out of your diet. I doubt you will have to make any major changes
     
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  3. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @DMWinter88 and welcome to the forum.
    You are right that in some ways it's actually better to be diagnosed as T2 Diabetic than to be constantly on the verge of being diagnosed as T2 Diabetic. If diabetic you get free retinopathy and neuropathy checks (eyes and feet).
    And the chances of getting those conditions hardly changes within such a small HbA1C range.

    I was never in that position, though I did get myself into remission and asked to stay as T2Diabetic (in remission) in the surgery's patient notes.
     
  4. DMWinter88

    DMWinter88 Type 2 · Member

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    Okay, that makes sense. So if I test before a meal, and then 2 hours after, and my sugar has spiked into the diabetic range, then it's something I need to cut out? And if it hasn't then it's probably fine to eat (with testing every now and again to make sure.)
     
  5. DMWinter88

    DMWinter88 Type 2 · Member

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    Presumably, I've lost my chance to be diagnosed now, as I've been eating healthy and cutting carbs for a while now.

    I guess I'm going to be stuck in some weird mid-ground. Not diabetic (medically speaking) but still unable to eat all the food I enjoy the most.
     
  6. Ronancastled

    Ronancastled Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've read of a few posters on here who had A1cs in the mid 50s who were given 3 months to turn it around before diagnosis.
    I've also seen people been slapped with a diagnosis with a single reading of 48, seem to be completely at the GPs discretion.

    Either way get yourself a meter & start testing.
    Lose some weight, reduce carbs & start walking, you'll be back in the non-diabetic zone in no time.
     
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  7. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    Not necessarily cut out, but have less of in one go until you find the right amount for you.
     
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  8. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    You may not be officially diagnosed, but your meter reading will show any impairment in your insulin response. There is a lot of tasty foods you can eat. Have a look at the section of the forum for low carb meals. Would you mind sharing what you eat now?
     
  9. coby

    coby Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I perfectly understand how you feel, despite it not happening to me, since my first reading 'was' into diabetes, but only by a little bit. But I guess you must feel that you are standing alone, with a probability of your GP rejecting you as a diabetic?
     
  10. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Expert

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    Haven't been in the same shoes, but can see where you're coming from... Basically, diabetic label from your GP or no, your body doesn't handle carbs well. Repressing T2 symptoms doesn't mean you're suddenly non-diabetic or cured. That's basically a thing that's for life. We can improve our insulin sensitivity some, but once we start eating carbs again like we did previously, we're right back where we started. So just go from the assumption that if the HbA1c is correct (when are you having the second one? How many months between the first?), you're basically prone to T2 and will have to stick with low carb to keep from getting into diabetic levels and complications. It's your safest bet. Of course, there are more methods to follow, but personally, the whole low carb thing was my weapon of choice... And it worked. https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/blog-entry/the-nutritional-thingy.2330/ might help.

    I'll be honest with you.... A lot of people who wander in here did get their diagnosis and they're as lost as you are. There's very little proper help out there because GP's and their practices are overtaxed (now especially), aren't usually very knowledgable about T2, and, well... A lot of people just feel left to their own devices. I know that's probably not much comfort, but you're not alone. You've got this joint.

    Be good to yourself eh, and ask whatever comes up in your mind.
    Jo
     
  11. DMWinter88

    DMWinter88 Type 2 · Member

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    Before my diagnosis, it would always be some form of potato, pasta, bread, rice, with some meat and a bit of veg.

    Since diagnosis, just trying different things. Ceaser salad for lunch is good. Something veg heavy for dinner generally. Yoghurt and berries for breakfast. That sort of thing.

    Finding it very hard though, as in all honesty, I hate most veg. Always have.
     
  12. DMWinter88

    DMWinter88 Type 2 · Member

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    That is how I feel. It feels like I've got all the downside of having the illness, and none of the benefit of being helped or treated for it.
     
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  13. DMWinter88

    DMWinter88 Type 2 · Member

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    Thank you, you're very kind!

    With regards to when I'm having the second one... I know this is bad, but I was meant to have it in July. I got the results of the first one in April. But my wife had a baby in May, so I got distracted, and never really got around to it. They haven't chased me up anything, so it's just sort of in Limbo. We're moving to a new town in a couple of weeks, so I guess I'll go to my new GP, explain the situation, and start again.
     
  14. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Sounds like you are a prime candidate for carnivore then. just meat, fish, eggs and dairy.
     
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  15. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Expert

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    Life is what happens when you're busy making other plans, right? Congrats on the baby, and hey... That's an extra reason right there to pick this up. You want to be able to dance at their wedding, in good health and everything. Or bounce their baby on your knee, eventually! You've got a plan, get moved, get checked, discuss with the new GP (and as you read here, you will know what questions to ask and all!), and you'll be right as rain. It will get better!
     
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  16. DMWinter88

    DMWinter88 Type 2 · Member

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    That is definitely the motivation. I've never managed to stick to a diet or exercise change when it was just for me, but now I'm doing it for her, it's not so bad. :)
     
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  17. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You might be interested to read my story, in conjunction with my signature.
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/think-im-being-thrown-out-of-the-club.182383/
    Same boat, welcome aboard :)
     
  18. Languagelearner

    Languagelearner Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    But diet advice for diabetics does not focus on forcefeeding yourself vegetables. Vegetables are actually carbohydrates, although not the sugary simple carbohydrates that are most harmful. But by the same token, you don't need huge quantities of veg, just enough to get key minerals.

    The thing about diets for people prone to diabetes is that it focuses on protein, mainly eggs and meat, not vegetables. It's a very savoury taste, which may leave some people pining for sweet things. But basically you can have beef, lamb, pork, bacon, chicken, fish, eggs. And that's mainly it!
     
  19. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Expert

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    @bulkbiker has a point... You might be more suited for a carnivore diet. That's practically zero carbs and all meat, fish, poultry, the fattier diary, eggs... Keep in mind though the carb flu you get when you dive into that way of eating can be brutal. Well, was for me, anyway. So do drink loads and get some electrolyte supplements to ease the transition. ;)
     
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  20. KennyA

    KennyA Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I think you've been lucky. Having that diagnosis label means a lot of negative things - your life insurance premiums go up, many insurers won't touch you, everything gets interpreted as "it's because you're diabetic", that sort of thing. As the (mistaken) belief is that diabetes is progressive and there is no cure, many organizations and institutions will treat you accordingly even if you've returned to normal blood glucose levels and are officially in remission. I speak from experience.

    This is a sort of summary of my first year. It might be of some use.
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/blog/kennya.517579/

    If you're worried about missing out on treatment, don't. I've never had any "treatment" from the NHS. Monitoring certainly, lots of that - feet, eyes etc, which I guess is intended to be a record of my "inevitable progression" but absolutely nothing that helped me. This forum has been 99% of my support and advice in the last two years.

    The good news is that if you have no symptoms now, reducing your blood glucose to normal levels gives you a much better chance of never developing any. And a low carb diet can do that in a matter of weeks.
     
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