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Do You Weigh Yourself Everyday Or Weekly?

Discussion in 'Weight Loss and Dieting' started by GerardNoah, Jul 17, 2018.

  1. GerardNoah

    GerardNoah · Newbie

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    I read a article here, it says'' the key is to measure your changes over longer periods of time and to make sure your measurements are as standardized as they possibly can be! Like, measure first thing in the morning, drink a glass of water (to make sure your water content is the same each time), and measure 2–3 times a week.'' should I weigh myself this often?
     
  2. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    I weigh monthly. But sometimes I forget to weigh that often.

    I find the daily fluctuations mess with my head if I weigh more often than that.
     
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  3. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi and welcome to the Forum Gerard as this is your first post I’ll tag in @daisy1 for her useful info post.
    I personally weigh every morning, no clothes, after using the toilet and before I eat or drink anything but only record it once a week to see the trend.
    Can I ask are you diabetic? Do you need to lose, maintain or gain?
     
  4. flexi06

    flexi06 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    On my Xpert course our course giver said weigh yourself every day. I have never done this before (as a regular thing) as I suffer a great deal with water retention but she was saying to not make a big deal of it, getting all hung up on a weekly weigh in etc. And for me this advice has proved correct. Now I weigh every morning and I prefer it ( despite having a yo-yo ing plateau of about 3lb for about 2.5 months.) I suppose it comes down to personal choice but I prefer daily - to keep on top of it. I can gain weight very quickly and this way I won’t be able to pretend it’s not happening lol.
     
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  5. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    Why are you weighing yourself at all?
    I do not own any scales and only get weighed at my annual diabetes review.
    However, my weight is not a concern - I think the weighing at the review is a tick-box exercise.

    If you are trying to lose (or gain weight), I can understand why you would want to keep an eye on it but agree with the other respondents to track trends rather than being concerned that you weigh 2kg more today than you did yesterday but 4kg less than a week ago.
     
  6. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    I think it must boil down to personal preference and comfort. I was weighing myself weekly but stopped weighing myself altogether when I found that I was dreading it. I can't honestly understand why one would weigh every day given the natural fluctuations that occur but I suppose it gives a sense of ease as long as the weight is going in the right direction of course (or is stable if that is what one is hoping for).
     
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  7. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    When I am actively trying to lose weight I weigh at the same time every morning. I do this because it helps me to know what fluctuations I am having. I can usually work out why I am a pound or so lighter or heavier. By weighing daily I see the pattern. If I weigh weekly I can get disappointed that I haven't lost weight, yet that may be just water retention from the day before and I may have in fact lost real weight. I am more likely to realise the reason and not stress about it if I weigh daily.

    When I am just happily lowish carbing and not focussing on weight loss then I don't weigh often. Maybe once a month.
     
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  8. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    I'm a daily weigher but then again I love data and spreadsheets and keeping an eye on things..
    Get up, pee and weigh then do FBG.. my morning routine before emptying the dishwasher and feeding the animals..
     
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    #8 bulkbiker, Jul 17, 2018 at 9:37 AM
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018
  9. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @GerardNoah

    Hello Gerard and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful and interesting. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  10. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    I do a step-on/step-off routine every day, having emptied my bladder on waking. Weekly I do a more full weigh in, where I take note of body fat, visceral fat and muscle percentages.

    As others have said, I have daily variations that don't concern me. My concerns are with trends. If I weighed only once a week, I would have no clue of that was a light or heavy day.

    Everyone is different, and if weighing daily would blow your mind, or waiting to weigh weekly or monthly, then do what suits you. It is just important you understand that a day of "gaining weight" may just be fluid or more food working its way through your system.
     
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    #10 DCUKMod, Jul 17, 2018 at 10:35 AM
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2018
  11. DavidGrahamJones

    DavidGrahamJones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Me too. I always found that a change in weight over a week was always put down to weight loss or weight gain (fat basically). However, on a daily basis where I can gain or lose as much as 1.5 kgs, I know, if my ankles are swollen, a gain is probably down to fluid retention, if I've had to take cocodomol (non soluble, that really messes things up) I know that my intestinal transit time has slowed down and food in the system is affecting weight.

    In the past I used to obsess on the weekly weigh-in, at least now I can see that fat loss/gain isn't all of what's going on. I haven't even started to worry about muscle gain/loss, something else some have told me is behind weight gain/loss. I know it can be measured, but how accurate are those scales that measure % fat/muscle?
     
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  12. MuntiJay

    MuntiJay Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I weigh myself every 2 days. You know I am struggling with my obesity since I graduated University. In Jue I decided to change my lifestyle and eat healthy food. Also I hired a personal trainer and even consulted with a cosmetologist as I wanted to sign up for butt injections procedures (I know that Kardashian had some for sure). As a result for two months I lost 10kg, my goal is 60 kg till the end of the summer.
     
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    #12 MuntiJay, Jul 31, 2018 at 2:22 PM
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2018
  13. novorapidboi26

    novorapidboi26 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Surely a daily weigh is pointless.......
     
  14. TwoRivers

    TwoRivers Type 2 · Active Member

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    I have been fighting the flab my whole life and managed to defeat it on occasion-- most of all in the last year when I have lost over 30 kilos. All the periods in my life when I have put on weight, sometimes massive amounts of weight, have been the times I took my eyes off the scales. Daily weighing is absolutely essential for me to control my weight. Doing so can indeed be depressing because the news is not always good after the first few weeks. There is a clear cycle to weight loss and upwards fluctuations can indeed be as high as 1.5 kilos increase in a day without any clear explanation. (But if you stick to your diet, there does seem to be a ceiling to these temporary increases.)
    The clear pattern I have seen when losing weight is for it to drop to a low level, then goes up a litte for a few days or even weeks and then goes down--provided one does not relax the diet, and one is much more likely to do so if you are not watching your weight.
    Why this happens, I don't know. Saying that the slight increase is 'water' is really just a rationalisation rather than a full explanation. Has any scientist looked at what is actually happening to the fat cells of a dieting person? The 'up' periods look to me suspiciously like attempts by my body to impose a high "appestat " i.e. temporary sharp increase in hunger, because during these episodes, even if I diet resolutely, there are higher readings for a few days. But if one persists -- and probably if one exercises as well -- weight goes back down and eventually reaches a new low.

    To me the people who say daily weighing-in is wrong and pointless are on a par with the NHS sages who tell you that low carb diets don't work and people should stick to low fat diets. My experience over the course of quite a long life suggests that they are completely wrong, at least for people like me.
     
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    #14 TwoRivers, Jul 31, 2018 at 5:14 PM
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2018
  15. sally and james

    sally and james Family member · Well-Known Member

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    I weigh myself once a year, in August, if there is an "R" in the month. As far as I'm concerned, if, each spring, I still fit last summer's trousers, that's fine.
    Sally
     
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  16. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    It's a bit like blood sugar testing, orr Librre trraces; it depends what you do with the information.

    I weigh every day, and once a week, I do a full scan, which does my body composition. Of course my weight varies, day to day, but I understand that so am not negatively impacted or lulled into a false sense of security by it.

    Having got skinny, I am keen not to be any skinnier, and for me, if I'm not carreful my weight can drop.

    It suits me. Others should do what suits them.
     
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  17. JohnR127

    JohnR127 Type 2 · Member

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    I bought a smart scale only to discover that you need two feet to make them work and I only have one. At that point I lost interest and just rely on having the waistband on my trousers as a check on my girth. When asked for my weight I just reply 80kilos as I was 75kilos the last time I was weighed.
     
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  18. Derbysocks

    Derbysocks Type 2 · Active Member

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    Weighing every day is a waste of time as your weight can vary by a few pounds. This can happen due to hormonal changes etc.
     
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  19. TwoRivers

    TwoRivers Type 2 · Active Member

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    Yes it can and does vary a bit every day, but no -- if you are trying to keep your weight under control or reduce it -- it is not a waste of time but an essential tool.
    And also, how much time do you waste, just stepping on to the scales to take a look once a day?
     
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    #19 TwoRivers, Aug 1, 2018 at 8:04 AM
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2018
  20. TwoRivers

    TwoRivers Type 2 · Active Member

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    It sounds as if you are someone whose diet and weight are stable and so that is indeed fine for you.
     
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