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Does anyone think that only calories from carbs can make you fat?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Tannith, Oct 17, 2017.

  1. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    Probably true.. however if your body ramps up your BMR in response to what you consume....then it's not quite such a simple "Calories In Calories Out" sum game as many state.
     
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  2. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    :D Less we forget...The magic lies in insulin...without which unused energy will not be stored as excess body fat...but simply waste away...

    [​IMG]
     
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    #22 kokhongw, Oct 17, 2017 at 5:30 PM
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2017
  3. serenity648

    serenity648 · Guest

    I find that I have to watch both my carb intake and my calories. Thats it really. However, I have experimented and the same amount of calories, made up of a higher percentage of carbs, put weight on me. If my same amount of calories have fewer carbs, I maintain or lose weight.
     
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  4. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Good question.
    Good question.
    Nhs believe energy in, energy out and any surplus turns to fat. ......er. no. Well not for me. Its not the full story, for me.

    Low carb gives me a glucose deficit so i lose weight. End of.
    Calories irrespective, however...... for me heavy calorie foods with fat in them nil and void my glucose deficit and I don't lose weight.
    I wouldnt like to test the heavy calorie diet for weight loss. As I've found what works for me. Low carb. Medium protein and low-medium fat. And plenty of insulin to keep my bgs between 4.5 and 6.0 ...for me.
     
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  5. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I have the opposite. As long as bgs are excellent range longterm, I lose weight....with enough insulin.
     
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  6. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Agree.
    Ramping up bmr via energy and exercise. If no exercise on raised energy, then turns to fat. Definitely......well, for me.
    Low carb gives me just enough glucose/energy for my slow metabolism ..only.
     
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  7. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    But it seems that even at rest, our body uses more energy when we are not eating many carbs, the worce case seems to be long term "moderate" low fat diets that result in many people's body using less energy. The ND diet seems to advoid this by being closer to fasting then a "moderate" diet, along with only being short term.
     
  8. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I lost 10kg before my T2D diagnosis...but weight has remain stable over the last 2 years since diagnosis. During that 10 kg lost, my thighs hollowed out.

    Hence I would be careful about using weight loss as a gauge...because of the risk of substantial loss in lean body mass. High circulating insulin is known to suppress fats burning/utilization...and may force the body to turn to protein/amino acids.
     
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  9. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Just wonder how you define overeating of carbs. The majority of non diabetic people eat quite a lot of carbs as they are usually a part of most family meals .To overeat them presumably you have to consume vast amounts of bread pasta rice potatoes and sugar stuff. I always considered I ate the normal but not excessive amount of carbs and I have never been overweight yet I still got T2
     
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  10. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    If everyone was the same, then an answer along with actual experience of how your system works to give the standard reply.
    In the case of calories, the norm is that if you eat too many, you get more body fat.
    But if your body is, as in diabetes, not in balance with your hormones, then calories can be ignored as the balance of fats, protein and carbohydrates are the most important part of your food intake.
    Control of your glucose levels, insulin levels and your intolerance to foods is vital to future health.
    Along with exercise that suits you, and the actual amount of food we eat, this is what should be recommended other than caloric values.

    With my rare condition, I have to put aside all the normal foods that people have and basically live on foodstuffs that don't create insulin, don't raise blood glucose levels, that assist in my health, and keep me feeling really good.

    If that means, I discount calories or counting carbs or all the usual rubbish spouted since before my diagnosis that I have been given, then that is what I have spent so much time and test strips, discovering what is right for me. Getting my control and balance right (ish), finding through my food diary, through hospital tests for how my unusual metabolic condition treats everything that goes down my throat as an experiment and having discussions with my endocrinologist, with certain members of this great community, sifted through all the information and noted the trends because of my decisions as gradually got my control and better health.
    I found my balance, I don't really care if others say I shouldn't do this, that or the other, I find it out for myself and then I use my experience and I put it to good use.
    I have discovered so much about how our bodies cope with food and how it affects the body if out of balance.
    I am now a master of my body, I won't go back to the time before diagnosis.
    No way! calories and carbs be damned!

    But as usual, what works for me doesn't work for most, so find out for yourself!
    By experimenting, testing, recording and eliminate those foods that make you ill.
     
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  11. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Do you think a person can afford a little of their muscle density? Especially when my muscle building naturally over 40yrs of diabetes. The more muscle density the higher my bmi and insulin resistance. Liver and my muscles stored far too much glucogen. Since reducing my muscle density I've half my 300units of insulin needed to just stay under 10s on my meter.
    I totally agree through reducing my protein stores.

    I have yet to see a skinny, fat free bodied lchf follower.
    Me neither.

    I have seen very lean low fat dieters thou. I know not sustainable diet for me thou.
    I will be looking to do stages to reduce my heavy weight.
    whatever works but done safely and under heavy nhs support.
     
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  12. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. First it's probably best to ignore calories completely as the body doesn't work like a food test furnace. The metabolic process for fats consumed in food is very different from the process for carbs and the fact that fat has twice the calories becomes irrelevant. Carbs are so easily absorbed and if in excess stored as fat by the liver that they need some control. So best to think carbs rather than calories. Always look at the back of any food packaging for the total carbs and in general ignore anything on the front of the pack.
     
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  13. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    On low calorie diets I go cold, pale and can hardly drag myself out of bed. I do not lose much weight.
    On a low carb diet I bounce about like Tigger, take myself out for walks and do lots of housework, I am pink skinned and radiate warmth. I eat far more calories and lose weight easily, without even thinking about it.
    The difference is so great that it seems that the calories from carbs not only don't make me fat, they act as a negative and allow me to eat far more real food and still lose weight.
     
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  14. Tannith

    Tannith · Well-Known Member

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    You don't need to do this. You can input your height and weight and general activity level into a BMR (basal metabolic rate) calculator on Google, and it will tell you what your daily calorie requirement is. I believe the NHS BMI (body mass index) calculator also gives you your daily calorie requirement but not all BMI calculators online do. But if you prefer to do it your way please don't be offended by this reply.
     
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  15. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    I'm no expert on the science behind it.. but my two pennorth would be that excess fat that the body doesn;t use would either be excreted or burnt up in a raised metabolism (probably both). There was an interesting talk at Low Carb Breckenridge about brown and white fat cells from I think Ben Bikman which I recall explained it quite well..

    I think that's the one although I will admit I saw it ages ago so could be wrong.
     
  16. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    I am not wholly convinced about the 'calories in calories out' mantra. I have been a wheelchair user for over a decade, with extremely low levels of activity and definitely no excercise. Yet I was slim even on the western diet. My weight barely changed until I cut out the carbs in order to take control of my T2. Even though my activity levels have still not changed I lost a little weight, how do you account for that? I really want to understand this but the closest I have got is to think of obesity as a symptom and as we all know if you take ten people with the same malady the symptoms and reactions will differ. Until more is known about the causes of T2 I fear that I will remain in the dark.
     
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  17. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    PFT makes sense to me. We are unique and I think all of these calculators that assess 'healthy' levels have parameters that are so wide as to make them virtually useless. I have played around with three of these and actually laughed at the differing results. It reminds me of the differing clothes sizes in different shops.
     
  18. Art Of Flowers

    Art Of Flowers I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Fat storage happens when insulin is used to process excess glucose in the blood, which typically happens after eating carbs. Eating fat does not raise blood sugars much. Burning body fat happens through a process called ketosis which happens when blood glucose is lower, e,g. when fasting. So eating carbs makes you fat, but eating fat doesn’t.
     
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