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Drinks - Raised Sugar Levels

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by MrBear2016, Feb 4, 2022.

  1. MrBear2016

    MrBear2016 Type 2 · Member

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    Hi All,

    I have been told for a long time I don't drink enough water however the water here is very hard to to make it drinkable I add sugar free Squash/Cordial does anyone find that this raises their sugar levels at all?

    Only asking as I have had to recently start to monitor my bloods and last night I went to bed I was 8.2 when I woke this morning and check I was 8.5 an the only thing I had consumed was approx half a pint of sugar free Squash/cordial.

    Thanks in advance for you help with this.
     
  2. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    It doesn't work like that - your liver can raise blood glucose levels to enable you to hunt down breakfast, it has nothing to do with eating or drinking.
     
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  3. catinahat

    catinahat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @MrBear2016
    There are lots of things that can affect our levels, stress, poor nights sleep, exercise and something called the dawn phenomenon mentioned by Resurgam . The other thing to bear in mind is the accuracy of the glucose meters +/- 15% for 90% of tests.' so your 2 results of 8.5 and 8.2 are essentially the same
     
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  4. MrBear2016

    MrBear2016 Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks for that :)
     
  5. jaywak

    jaywak Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree with all the other posts there are so many things that can raise our blood sugars , but I will say that only recently I have discovered that if I drink the cheaper supermarket brands sugar free drinks it does raise my blood sugar , I think you'll have to try a little bit of experimenting .
     
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  6. Ronancastled

    Ronancastled Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The No Added Sugar cordials still have carbs but even allowing for that you are using so little vs the water content that I doubt it amounts to much.
     
  7. Outlier

    Outlier · Well-Known Member

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    Tap water in my district is revolting too. I drink fizzy bottled water and have found different brands differ in taste, but all are nice.
     
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  8. BrianDoc

    BrianDoc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Asda sparkling flavoured waters are virtually carb free, although they have doubled in price in recent months.
     
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  9. markpj31

    markpj31 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Think ALDI's versions are still pretty cheap?
     
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  10. markpj31

    markpj31 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Some of the 'no added sugar' drinks have some real fruit juice in them (I know Robinsons put a little in). As mentioned already though, early morning your liver starts to pump out glucose (and other things) to get you ready for the day ahead. Great for people with working/enough insulin, but not great for diabetics. It all depends on the person I guess.
     
  11. Sarah69

    Sarah69 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I don’t drink plain water either, I have tea, coffee or water with squash in.
     
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  12. MrBear2016

    MrBear2016 Type 2 · Member

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    Do you find drinking tea with milk effects your sugars at all as I'm a sucker for a builders brew
     
  13. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    I just count the carbs in the milk, as I do any other carbs.
     
  14. Geordie_P

    Geordie_P Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think weak Robinsons should be ok, but out of the no sugar options available here, I noticed lemon is 0.3 carbs per 100ml, orange is 0.6 and apple blackcurrant is 1 point something, or thereabouts. I don't know if it makes a big difference but I go for the no added sugar lemon because of this. (Rather have blackcurrant though...)
     
  15. finzi1966

    finzi1966 · Well-Known Member

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    Is that per 100ml of the concentrate? Or of the made-up drink? If it’s of the made-up drink I could really see how that could mount up quick if you drink a lot! (If it’s of the concentrate then I guess it would be negligible)
     
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  16. Sarah69

    Sarah69 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn’t know I’ve never tested after drinking tea!
     
  17. Geordie_P

    Geordie_P Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Great question: it's the concentrate.
     
  18. KennyA

    KennyA Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Not enough milk in my tea to have a noticeable impact. However the amount of hot milk in a large latte does raise my BG as might be expected, given the lactose. I do wonder whether the folks reporting a BG rise after drinking coffee are actually experiencing a rise due to milk.
     
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  19. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    A latte has around 20g of carbs. It's not only the milk. Milk has around 5g per 100ml. Maybe there is sugar automatically put in, or something? Most popular lattes have sugar in
     
  20. KennyA

    KennyA Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Always a risk, but I'm sure there was no sugar in it. Made while I watched, just espresso and milk. If it had sugar, the reading would probably have been quite a bit higher.
     
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