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Hi all...

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Rox1991, Jun 20, 2019.

  1. Rox1991

    Rox1991 · Newbie

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    Hello everyone, I'm not actually newly diagnosed. Been diagnosed type 2 for about a year and a half now. Only just started doing something about it though.
    So since diagnosis, I went on a binge of eating everything in sight and ignoring the problem. Apparently I've caused slight damage to my kidneys because of this. I started meds about 14months after diagnosis but have been up and down remembering the meds.
    Anyway, I moved home and was off the meds for about a month as I started taking something new for depression which led me to...pass blood. While I was off the meds I ate a big bar of galaxy every night for a month (I know, stupid thing to do)
    Gone back on the meds, minus the anti depressant, but now I keep finding I'm waking up with a numb/tingly hand, its there in two of my fingers atm and has been for 2 hours now. Now and again I also get it in my legs/feet and the bottom of my tummy is also numb. I can stick my finger nail in and I can't feel it at all. Should I be off to see my doc about this?
    I must also note, I haven't been to any of my screenings, I'm the worst patient known to man and keep thinking if I ignore it, it'll go away, clearly not. I'm still trying to come to terms with everything, I'm finding it all so hard.
    Anyway, sorry for the long winded post and thanks if you've read this far.
    Xxxxxxxxx
     
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  2. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Should you see your doc? You ask the question knowing full well what the answer will be. ;)

    Uh, yeah. You should.

    There's such a thing called diabetic neuropathy. If your numbers have been high for a long time they can cause nerve damage, which may be what you're experiencing. I'm not a doctor though, so I can't diagnose, but it is something you want to see someone about. They could help you, after all.

    And you're not alone in getting contrary after diagnosis. It's a normal part of the grief process (and that does hit us when we get diagnosed with something this "big"), but it's becoming time you do something about it. You've already found that ignoring the problem doesn't make it go away. Actually, it just made things worse. So now's the time to take the bull by the horns. Because guess what: High bloodsugars also affect mood. Your depression can get a lot worse, (as can things like anxiety, panic attacks, moodswings), so that's another reason to try and get on top of this thing. And hey.... It's not even all that difficult!

    Not pulling your leg here. It really is relatively simple.

    Have a read here: https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/blog-entry/the-nutritional-thingy.2330/ , and if you're up for more information after that info-overdose, try dietdoctor.com, Dr. Jason Fung's The Diabetes Code and this forum's website. Then you're armed and ready to kick T2 in the ****.

    You can do this.
    Hugs, and welcome,
    Jo
     
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  3. Rox1991

    Rox1991 · Newbie

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    Thank you Jo, I was given all the info from my nurse but I binned it all so don't have much info about diabetic neuropathy or about how high blood sugar can effect moods and depression etc. The depression came back quite sudden so thinking this is probably why. Will make an appt with my doc and have a look at the link you've shared, thanks xxxxxxxxx
     
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  4. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    Get yourself to a doctor ... you need a decent check up. No use in regrets right now.

    Full bloods and get it done. Tough love, but time for action. Today.
     
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  5. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome.

    Dont apologise for a long post. Great that you have explained how you feel. Also great that you have joined the forum. You will find lots of help and support here.

    Have a look at this link, you might find it helps you to understand.

    https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/mental-health-sugar-brain
     
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  6. Caeseji

    Caeseji Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome to the forum Rox!

    Honestly I went there too, got diagnosed when I was 27 and ignored the issue for like a year and then got the worst wake-up call in the world so don't beat yourself up about that at all. It sounds like you have been on a roller coaster ride when it comes to meds and depression but I would concur with the others. Get yourself to the doctors and get your screenings done and never worry about the length of the post at all, I find it's a great way to get out your ills when you can write it down. Take it from me, high BG's can wreak havoc on your mind so getting it under control will help with a lot of other issues and we will always be here to help no matter what.

    Just take care of yourself and use all the services available to you, it's a marathon and not a sprint and even some things like slight damage? They can be reversed by keeping your bloods under control, you can do this xx
     
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  7. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello, We are all sending you lots of hugs!
    I think at this stage - yes, call up your gp surgery, get all the necessary blood work done and get help for diabetes and your mental health. If you haven't bought yourself a blood glucose meter yet, please get yourself one. There are T2s that have recommendations for one with affordable test strips that will enable you to keep track of your readings and see which foods affect you. Like @Knikki , have a seat with us and enjoy the journey because it's a long ride. Please do have a read around on the forums on LCHF or keto diets which will help.

    I wanted to say it must have taken a lot of strength in you to reach out to us on this forum, you need to keep that strength going when you see your doctors and nurses. They can only help you, if you help yourself. See you on the other side, warrior!
     
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  8. Rox1991

    Rox1991 · Newbie

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    Thank you so much for all the replies, I'm feeling so much better about this situation. Its not like I'm a total stranger to diabetes, most of my family have it. I just felt so lost all of a sudden and I popped to my docs about sorting myself out thinking "oh I'll get some meds and maybe a machine to keep an eye on my sugar levels" but nope! They crammed so much info into my face that I panicked I will definitely book up with my doc surgey and will also ask them to refer me back to the right clinics for my screenings.
    I made some progress today, hit the choccy isle in sainsburys fully intending on buying the biggest bar I could find...found it but walked away, got a nice healthy salad for tea!
    Small step but huge impact. Got to keep things positive and hopefully I'll be on here more regularly to keep myself positive and upto date with everything
    Thank you all
    Xxxxxxxxxxx
     
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  9. Rox1991

    Rox1991 · Newbie

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    If I call my docs for an appt they will book me in for a weeks time, call them at 8am tomorrow and I'll get one tomorrow morning sometimes tough love is the kick up the backside people need and I'm definitely one of them!
    Xxxxxxxx
     
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  10. Energize

    Energize Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Rox1991
    As already said, well done for coming to the forum and expressing how you are feeling regarding this 'unfortunate' state of inability of your body to cope with the 'lovely foods' ;) Yes, I'm an ex-chocoholic (if one ever becomes 'ex') and yes, it stinks but it sounds like you're ready now to face it head on :) It took me a lot longer than you have, I have to say ;)

    In spite of what the HCPs will tell you, you are well-advised to get yourself a meter. CodeFree is one that is inexpensive to buy and also the test strips, which are the ongoing cost, are much more reasonable. There is another one, Tee* something or other, I believe.

    I agree you should see your GP who will be able to instigate the regular checks again.

    Well done you ;) Go for it and kick this 'condition' off the horizon, eh? ;)
     
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  11. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    I'll be around to remind you ..... in the virtual sense of course.
     
  12. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    There are high cocoa chocolates around - a lot better for you than the over 50 percent carb sorts.
    I used to buy several bars and carefully ration it, or used it finely chopped or grated in desserts - but I have not bought any for over a month now - maybe even longer, now I think about it. I'd far rather have berries and cream - maybe with some no sugar jelly.
     
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  13. Severe_Needle_phobia

    Severe_Needle_phobia Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Rox1991
    Warm welcome to the forum .
    I see you have had some great advice already onto this post and I'm sure there is plenty more that will follow .

    After been frustrated, scared ,angry after diagnosis few years back , I now think about diabetes as .my personal enemy.
    Used to be he frightened and made me feel so scared and empty .

    Not anymore
    Now by taking control of my life by eating more sensible and doing as much exercise as I can reading through the superb forum threads on this fantastic have help me hlkeep enemy from dictating my lifestyle.

    I really wish you well on your journey ,
    Once you can get in control I promise you ,you will feel better both mentally and physically.
     
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  14. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    You will be okay, and you won't have to do this alone, nor get it right overnight now you've turned your new leaf. And get yourself some extra dark (85% or more) chocolate. If it's too bitter to your taste, add a mouthfull of cream (or even better, a heaped teaspoon clotted cream. Heaven!). You won't go through a whole bar in one sitting because one or two pieces'll be quite enough, and it does hit the spot. Without mucking up your bloodsugars.

    And yeah, it's a lot of information, but you've got time to learn it at your own pace. For me, taking notes helped. ;)
     
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  15. ShortStuff

    ShortStuff · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Rox

    I’ve been diagnosed as T2 for 6 years now but believe I’ve been T2 for 20 years or at the very least heavily ore-diabetic for that time. Long, boring, story

    When I first had it confirmed I was terrified of losing my sight and went straight on a low carb diet and brought my levels down to the ‘normal’ Range very quickly, but after a while I fell (well more threw myself) off the wagon and have spent as much time off the wagon as on it. I’m back on it again and my numbers are pretty good

    I don’t take any meds as I *can * control it with diet (I just need to DO it consistently) and prefer that approach

    Be wary of what your Diabetic Team at your GP’s suggest, some are very behind the times and recommend a moderately high carb diet and while that’s appealing, most of us believe it’s not the best approach. If I ate as they suggest I’d be in a ton of meds !

    The DN will probably give you a meter and maybe 1 script for the strips the rest you’ll more than likely have to self fund. (I buy from eBay) I personally like the Aviva Perfotma monitor and fast Clix finger pricker. The DN will tell you that as a T2 you don’t need to test, but if you don’t test how will you know which foods spike YOUR body and which don’t? (You won’t)
    They say that T2’s obsess/stress about the numbers if they test...so? I’d rather know than stress about the unknown! Then I can adjust my food/habits to improve my BSL hbA1c every few ninths just isn’t enough (IMO)


    If you’re interested in low carbing you’ll find all the info you’ll ever need here. But the book that I personally found interesting helpful and informative without being daunting to read was Dr Briggs. escape The Diet Trap

    Good Luck whatever path you take to getting (& Keeping!) control of it
     
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    #15 ShortStuff, Jun 27, 2019 at 10:39 PM
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2019
  16. Stephen Lewis

    Stephen Lewis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    To add to the good news for you, many of us on this forum have got our glucose levels under control. Some have seen their neuropathy go into remission or stop (I'm working on this). Diet is the key and I am now trying to keep my carbs to below 50 gms per day. Use the meter testing to see what works best for you. The usual suggestion is to test 1 hour and 2 hours after eating. This allows you to see the affects of different foods. We all react differently to the same thing but I have found that a couple of pieces 85%+ dark chocolate has little affect on my bg level.
    Also set yourself a target for your bg. I am trying to get my daily average down to less than 6% so that my next A1c will be in the normal range and that is where I will keep it. "'-wagons" travel too fast in Canada to fall off and the fall hurts. Do the research, stay on the forum with questions, answers and observations, keep testing and go low carb. It is not too late to make a difference.
     
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  17. LindsayJane

    LindsayJane Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Tee2+ from spirit-healthcare.co.uk. Meter keeps a 90 day average, which is useful. Strips not too costly either.
     
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