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How to gain weight without carbs

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Valsal, Jul 19, 2019.

  1. Valsal

    Valsal · Newbie

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    I was diagnosed with type 2 due to cancer treatment. "cancer drug treatment induced diabetes" I am struggling to hold any weight while sticking yo low Carb diet. Tried usual stuff
     
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  2. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Added fats whilst lowering carbs? Added more? Perhaps more protein?
     
  3. Muneeb

    Muneeb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In general if you have a calorific surplus, you will gain weight. Fats have more calories per gram than protein or carbs. So eat more fats or proteins, such as nuts as these are very calorie dense.
     
  4. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just checking that you've definitely got T2 rather than T1 or T3c? As if you're losing weight because of lack of insulin rather than insulin resistance the advice is rather different....
     
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  5. Valsal

    Valsal · Newbie

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    Yes definitely Type2 apparently. Tablets were mentioned initially but after hospital admittance, doc carried on with insulin.
    I have to have an immunotherapy drug (cancer treatment) every 3 weeks which doesn't help!!
     
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  6. derry60

    derry60 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I thought fats did not cause weight gain, as that is what I have read
     
  7. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    It may do if the calorie content is too high.

    My personal experience was that after I lost all my excess weight on low carb and needed to gain a few pounds and then maintain I actually reduced my carbs for blood sugar reasons and at the same time seriously upped my fats with extra protein. I vastly increased my egg consumption, started eating cheese that previously had been off the menu, extra cream, increased my mayonnaise and vastly increased my butter. I put those few pounds back on to reach an ideal weight and have maintained for over 4 and a half years. Whilst losing weight I was also calorie counting in addition to carbs, fats and protein amounts. I stuck to about 1200 calories. Once the weight had gone I increased this to 1800 calories with the increased fats and protein. Once stable, I stopped counting. No idea how many calories I eat now but my weight doesn't fluctuate.

    If weight gain is needed, it can only come from increasing carbs, fats or protein. There is no other way. Carb increase isn't wise, so it's down to fats and protein.
     
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  8. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Well if increasing carbs in inadvisable and protein can have some more limited effect on glucose levels it only leaves fats! In keto, and low carb, carbs are eaten to a set limit. Protein is eaten to a goal to protect lean muscle and repair processes. Fats are a lever for satiety and control. Eat fewer and fat from the body is utilised and weight lost. Eat more and that’s what gets used for energy and if in excess stored as weight gain.

    What I think gets confused is fat as a nutrient in and of itself gets blamed for obesity rather than considered as a whole picture and in neglect of the role carbs play, especially for diabetics. Too much energy intake for a particular body (and depending on the health status of that particular body) compared to the amounts actually able to be used will lead to gains. What’s tricky is working out what’s going in, what’s being used properly and efficiently, what’s being stored and why. We are not closed loop lab machines. We run multiple systems in sync and they all effect the calculations in ways simple equations can not cope with. Eg CICO is just too simplified and unmeasurable in the real human.
     
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  9. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    are you a type 2 on insulin? Could you fill in your profile please, and then people replying will know how to tailor their suggestions.
     
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  10. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    If you are fat adapted and eat fats, without over doing it, your body will preference burning fat for fuel what you eat and some stored fat. If you over eat fats, this is stored energy so weight will be gained. The worst case scenario is high carbs and high fat. The carbs need to be burned off first, the overflow of this will turn to fat, adding to the fats consumed.

    Eating higher protein allows more calories without the associated weight gain (of the top of my head I believe I have cross referenced 300 - 400 calorie leeway). The thermal effect of protein is greatest as the body works harder.
     
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  11. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It possible thay some slow release carbs (think lentils, beans etc) are needed to allow enough inslin to grain weight.
     
  12. Archvile

    Archvile · Member

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    I am going through a similar process. How to gain weight wile staying low carb.
    Based on my personal research and practice I would second the opinion of increasing protein/fiber and fats. You also want to keep an eye on the quality of fats. Saturated fats would inadvertently hit your cholesterol levels.
    Nuts, beans, eggs (I try to consume only the egg whites with a dash of yolk), low carb chesses, chicken, did I say eggs.
    I don't know your personal situation but I do also recommend a little bit of weight lifting to gain a bit of muscle, or at least keep the muscle from losing away.
    Good luck and cheers*
     
  13. pixie1

    pixie1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Saturated fats do not effect cholestral levels. Out of interest Archville why do you only eat egg white?
     
  14. Archvile

    Archvile · Member

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    Hi pixie1,

    It is my understanding that saturated fat increase the LDL levels or what I know of as the bad cholesterol.
    I am sketchy on the egg yolk because I have read contradictory articles. Some suggest they are OK some suggest they aren't. Most researches I read about give statistics on one egg a day. I eat around 3 eggs a day, so to err on the side of not OK, I avoid the yolks. Egg whites also give me the proteins necessary for my workout.
     
  15. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    I've read that the saturated fats you eat only contribute around 15% to your liver's output of cholesterol hence having sat fat should have very little effect. It appears to be your overall diet etc including carbs that drives the liver's output.
     
  16. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    The egg cholesterol myth was widely debunked 10 yrs ago
     
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  17. pixie1

    pixie1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Most people's experience is that says do not effect cholestral. It certainly did not effect my cholesterol levels. In fact my Doctor said he never known my blood results to be so good. Silver lining in being diabetic, you learn, that the mantra which NHS give on healthy eating, I in fact incorrect. It makes it hard when people insist carbs Is important, I just want to keep my limb.
    Saturated fats are liquid form in room temperature, very difficult to vlog the arteries ere as hydrogenated fats in do
     
  18. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    But all the goodness is in the yolks.

    My understanding is the liver makes our cholesterol as and when it is needed. If we consume dietary cholesterol the liver simply makes a bit less.

    I have 3 eggs a day on average, and eat tons of saturated fats from dairy foods. My lipids are perfect. What I don't eat are vegetable fats and seed oils. (except the rapeseed in my mayonnaise but that is compensated for by the omega 3 it contains)
     
  19. Muneeb

    Muneeb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes there's always a lot of conflicting info. But Dr Berg also comments on these "studies" that don't have sufficient control measures for the assessments. He has 4 eggs a day himself and has for over 30 years, he doesn't believe the risks are there for people without preexisting conditions.
     
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  20. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think you will find that there are hundreds (possibly thousands) on here who agree that Saturated Fats are actually good (not bad) and that it is Carbs in quantities promoted by government policies which are actually bad - at least for T2 diabetics!
     
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