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Insulin and Honeymooning: tips for a Newbie

Discussion in 'Type 1.5/LADA Diabetes' started by Andrea _NuBe, Jan 11, 2019.

  1. Andrea _NuBe

    Andrea _NuBe · Newbie

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    Hi everyone,

    Thought it was about time I introduced myself, I’m Andrea.

    First and foremost, I’d like to thank all those who offer advice on this forum, it has been incredibly valuable to my journey so far.

    So my diabetes journey started in August 2018 when I had a blood test after having repeated thrush. Soon I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes after having a HBA1c of 98. I couldn't get my head round it, I had no other symptoms, I’m 33, I eat fairly healthily (I have a bmi of 25) and every specialist I saw appeared bemused.

    I asked for a GAD test, got the result back which came back as they were positive, recently got my islet cell test results back which was also positive. My HBA1c has reduced to 60 (as of December 2018)

    So now I am being treated as a Type 1/LADA but DSN and doctor say I may never get a clear diagnosis. Although I’ve found it challenging to accept, I’m trying not to let it consume my life.

    Yesterday I had my appointment with DSN and have started on Novorapid insulin which I take 3 times a day with each meal. I’ve always been anxious around injection, it’s taking me a while to psych myself up, I’m 4 injections in now, does anyone have any tips on getting use to the injecting yourself, making it as painless as possible, any spots on the body better than others?

    I’m really keen (as I’m sure all newbies are) to preserve the functioning beta cells I have left, hence my move to insulin. Anyone have any idea on prolonging the honeymoon period? I have read a few papers on about starting on insulin asap but that’s about all I can find.

    Any advice, much appreciated :)

    Andrea
     
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  2. Providence 62

    Providence 62 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    I can only speak for myself, but I use my belly for my jabs (2 daily) as long as you stay away from the central line of your tum it will be less ouch-y, apparently there are less nerves towards the sides. One thing I found that really stopped any stings or ouchies making sure I grabbed a good bit of skin between finger and thumb. It's virtually painless for me doing it that way.

    Hope this helps. I have been injecting for about three months now, so am by no means an expert.

    P
     
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  3. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hello @Andrea _NuBe and welcome :)

    I remember having the exact same thoughts as you about prolonging my honeymoon period, thinking it would be easier to cope with taking smaller amounts of insulin, however I found my control very hard after a few months simply because my levels were erratic and it affected my mood, the truth was that once my pancreas stopped working that things levelled out more and my control was much easier. In regards to injections try not to fixate on the act itself so much, so use a distraction technique, look at a clock or hum a tune as you pinch an inch and inject to the count of ten, always keep insulin at room temperature too, from the fridge and it will sting and trust me injecting does get a lot easier in time, soon you will do it without much thought.

    Also keep talking to those around you or here, support is vital. Best wishes J.
     
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  4. Daibell

    Daibell Type 1.5 · Master

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    Hi and welcome. I've not heard of any way to lengthen the honeymoon period other than starting insulin earlier rather than later. You should be injecting in the stomach area avoiding the centre. You will find over time the nerves deaden which makes life easier. As you have positive test results you are T1/LADA and the GPs should accept the test and not be so silly. How do they think every other T1 has a confirmed diagnosis? As you go thru the honeymoon period and you need more insulin you should be put onto full Basal/Bolus by adding the daily Basal. This is the NICE standard for T1s, so do ask for it as your BS controls becomes more difficult.
     
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  5. Andrea _NuBe

    Andrea _NuBe · Newbie

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    Thanks @Juicyj @Providence 62 and @Daibell for your responses :)
    Maybe that's where I'm going wrong, I haven't been grabbing a bit of tummy to inject, I'll try that and see if it helps!
    At the moment I am on a fixed amount of insulin, I do wonder how it will pan out once I return to work and have a little less control over when I eat and may eat out more.
    Yes so I've done a fair amount of reading around the different types of diabetes, LADA does seemed to fit.
    Thanks again
     
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  6. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hello @Andrea _NuBe

    Yes always grab and inch, it's the easiest way to inject, like anything new it will get easier in time.

    At some point in the future rather than taking fixed amounts of insulin you can learn to carb count and take (bolus) fast acting insulin to cover food and for corrections and a (basal) long lasting insulin to cover your bodies needs over 24 hours, it gives you much better control over managing fluctuating blood glucose levels and over what you can eat, but this is a conversation you can have with your DSN in the future if you feel this would suit you better.
     
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