1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2018 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Monitor yes or no...

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by AngiH, Dec 6, 2018.

  1. AngiH

    AngiH · Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Hi all
    I am new here and although my reading is only 43 6.1 I'm aware this is prediabetic. I'm not expecting much help from my Doctors especially reading lots of comments in this forum. But my question is, should I consider getting a monitor or not bother unless down the line my readings get worse.
    This has come totally out of the blue and I'm trying to get my head round the change ahead, but know it is now I have to act.
    Thanks for reading
     
    • Hug Hug x 3
  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    7,911
    Likes Received:
    5,406
    Trophy Points:
    178
    My personal opinion is that of a resounding yes, test. You do not want to go 'further down the line'. Pre Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes need not be the chronic, progressive disease that our health care professionals would have us beleive. You may find that a few tweaks to your diet and excercise regimes means that you never reach T2 levels and may not have to test as rigorously as other people do but a glucometer is a very useful tool in educating you on how you as an individual react to certain foods.
     
    • Agree Agree x 6
    • Like Like x 1
  3. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    10,368
    Likes Received:
    8,219
    Trophy Points:
    298
    It kind of depends on you and your personality.
    In my case I don't like nasty surprises so monitor because I want to keep an eye on my blood sugar levels so I can be fairly confident that my HbA1c will be ok when I get my annual test. In the early days it is also very informative as to what foods cause blood sugars to spike and thus to avoid.
    However I can see that for some people it could become a bit of an obsession. So it will depend on you. As your levels are quite low you'd probably gain a lot of benefit in the early days from food monitoring so I'd say go for it.
    Test before first mouthful and then 2 hours after a meal and see how much your blood sugar goes up. If you want to let us know what you ate and how much your sugar goes up we can advice the likely culprits in each meal and then you'll soon get the hang of what not to eat.
    It will be things like breakfast cereal, bread, pasta, rice, root veg and sweet fruits. You may be able to handle these in smaller quantities although personally I skip them altogether these days but then again my HbA1c on diagnosis was 87 mmol/m so significantly higher than yours!
     
    • Agree Agree x 6
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

    Messages:
    21,832
    Likes Received:
    28,694
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I agree with @Guzzler and @bulkbiker

    You won't know if your HbA1c is deteriorating until your next test, which is likely to be in 12 months if your surgery is not one of the pro-active ones. That may be too late. By buying a meter you can see instantly what is happening and be able to do something about it before your next test.
     
    • Agree Agree x 5
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,189
    Likes Received:
    7,120
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I agree with all of the above . You have a head start on me, I was only diagnosed when I was well into the diabetic range. You have a chance to get back down to non diabetic level quickly, a meter will only help you do this.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Like Like x 2
  6. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    984
    Likes Received:
    995
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Yup, test. Now's the time to do something about becoming diabetic, and a meter will help you do that. There's no such thing as too much information.
     
    • Agree Agree x 5
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,322
    Likes Received:
    11,203
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Another me too agrees post!

    Definitely get yourself a meter, use it and most importantly - as you've mentioned - act on the information if provides about the effects different foods may have on your diet, and you'll have the opportunity to improve your glucose levels or at the very least stabilize them.

    Robbity
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 2
  8. BloodThirsty

    BloodThirsty · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    36
    Trophy Points:
    18
    A meter and a low carb diet and you will be back in the normal blood glucose range faster than banana skins.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,604
    Likes Received:
    3,228
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I would ask yourself what you are trying to achieve by testing.
    If you are testing to find out what is raising your BG and to adjust your lifestyle/diet to avoid becoming a person with type 2 diabetes, absolutely test.
    If you are testing to find out if/when you pass from pre-diabetes to diabetes, you know it has happened but, so what?

    I guess my point is, testing alone does not stop your diagnosis, only changes will.
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 2
  10. AngiH

    AngiH · Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Wow thank you all. Ok I think the next step is knowing the best monitor to buy without breaking the bank haha.... I just am still a bit overwhelmed and part of me thinks there is nothing wrong and the blood test is not right!! I absolutely want to put this right so I guess the monitor is going to prove an invaluable asset! I now need to overcome the fact that last time I had a finger prick test done in the chemist a few years back I almost passed out..how embarrassing! Thanks again
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    424
    Likes Received:
    356
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Absolutely yes. You can’t make informed dietary choices without monitoring your own glucose. The official advice to actively discourage patients from measuring their own blood glucose is utterly absurd. The only logical conclusion I can draw is that someone doesn’t want you to get better.

    Sorry for the conspiracy theory vibe but it winds me up. Totally preposterous! :D
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 2
  12. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

    Messages:
    21,832
    Likes Received:
    28,694
    Trophy Points:
    298
    You are not alone in this thought. I thought that myself, many newcomers think that, and I guess many members on the forum thought that. It is part of the initial shock and denial. Perfectly common and perfectly normal. In my case, my diagnosis test was the 2nd January, which fell immediately after the excesses of Christmas, New Year, my birthday and a holiday. I was wrong, the diagnosis was right!!
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  13. AngiH

    AngiH · Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    8
    This is going to be a rollercoaster, my husband is saying a quick diet and I'll be back to normal and can revert to my normal eating..I'm not sure how true this is, or am I always going to be on that edge of watching etc? He seems to think there is actually nothing wrong with me, not in a bad way. He is the most supportive person, but I think he feels it's not anything to worry about and that I don't need to read into stuff. I think deep down he is trying to keep me calm as I'm a worrier at the best of times...
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  14. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    424
    Likes Received:
    356
    Trophy Points:
    83
    You’re always going to have to moderate your carbohydrate intake. Otherwise you wouldn’t be where you are now. This is a good thing. Think of it as a wake-up call that everything you once thought you knew about healthy nutrition was upside down :)

    In short, respectfully, your husband is wrong.
     
    • Agree Agree x 7
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  15. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    984
    Likes Received:
    995
    Trophy Points:
    133
    ...I wish your husband was right. But you have a genetic predisposition for diabetes. A "quick diet" isn't going to change that. Now that you know, you can avoid getting T2 for a long time, who knows, maybe indefinitely, but it will take work.

    I like to give hope to people who have been diagnosed T2 and feel like their world has ended. I tell them it'll be okay, and they will be, *if* they're willing to do the work... You're in the luxury position that you can head this off just by lowering your carb-intake. No complications, no worries when you're ill with something else, making your sugars out of control... No sugar peaks when you have a sleepless night or such things. If I'd had that choice, if I'd known what was going on and how to tackle it... I never would've gotten this far.

    You're on the road to T2. Fact of life. Now you decide whether to take it seriously and stop it before it starts, or end up with regrets and coulda shoulda woulda's. I'd give a lot to be in your shoes right now. And tell your husband it's a lot easier with proper support at home. Mine was at every appointment and consultation, learned all he could, was right there with me through all of it. Worries got shared, victories too. It's good not to be alone in this. And I'm hoping it'll never get so far for you, as it's gotten for me.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  16. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    353
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Meter from me.

    I did read there are 4 stages to type 2 diabetes.
    Stage 4 IS type 2
    Stage 3 IS pre-diabetes
    Stage 2 IS insulin resistance..
    Can't remember what stage 1 was, but if I could turn back clock and halt this with no meds, no complications, just by adjusting my food choices....I would in an instant.

    I would say welcome to the club, but hopefully I won't have to...:D
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    10,368
    Likes Received:
    8,219
    Trophy Points:
    298
    The weird and wonderful thing is so many of us have become far more aware of what we eat and what food can do to us that we now look upon our diagnosis as being a life changing positive. Not everyone but a fair old few have made major lifestyle changes and are reaping many benefits as well as becoming (in many cases) smarter than our doctors especially where T2 diabetes is concerned.
     
    • Agree Agree x 5
    • Like Like x 3
    • Winner Winner x 1
  18. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,189
    Likes Received:
    7,120
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I agree with @bulkbiker , my diagnosis has been a blessing in disguise, as well as getting my type 2 under control, I’ve lost a shed load of weight, my blood pressure is now normal on half the BP meds I was on and my arthritis is more bearable too. I feel younger and more energetic. You won’t be sorry if you take action now rather than at a later date :)

    Here are some meters that are popular on the forum:

    Taken from a post by @Bluetit1802 as she wrote it so nicely:


    The most popular meters for self funding T2's are the Codefree and the Tee2 because the strips are much cheaper than other meters, and you need a lot of strips. You can't buy them in pharmacies.


    Try here for the Codefree meter

    http://homehealth-uk.com/product-category/blood-glucose/blood-glucose-monitor/


    and here for the extra strips

    http://homehealth-uk.com/all-products/sd-codefree-test-strips-to-be-used-only-with-the-sd-monitor/


    There are discount codes if you buy in bulk.

    5 packs 264086

    10 packs 975833


    The Tee2 is here

    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product/tee2-plus-blood-glucose-meter/


    Don’t forget to check the box that you have diabetes so you can buy VAT free. (for either meter)
     
    • Like Like x 3
  19. AngiH

    AngiH · Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Thank you all, looks like a new me in the new year...fingers crossed I can turn this round.
     
    • Winner Winner x 7
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  20. suesullivan53

    suesullivan53 Type 1 · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Hi hope all goes well for you but please seek advice about which monitor you buy as some can be unreliable.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook