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PR SUCCESSES - GETTING THE WORD OUT THAT LCHF IS THE BEST DIET TO HELP TREAT TYPE 2 DIABETES

Discussion in 'Success Stories and Testimonials' started by Debandez, Sep 25, 2018.

  1. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Also Katie Goulding’s stuff was interesting. I am borderline Fylde Coast. Well, am inside the Fylde Coast zone, NHS-wise.
     
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    #221 Listlad, Apr 13, 2019 at 9:55 PM
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
  2. carol43

    carol43 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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  3. shelley262

    shelley262 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    And todays daily Mail if interested featured me in Green! I never wear green so an interesting choice of colour forme!
    https://mol.im/a/6938665
    todays final part - 19/04/19 can be accessed via this link
    Im featured in todays copy of the mail
     
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  4. carol43

    carol43 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I saw you.
     
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  5. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Expert

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    Great article.
     
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  6. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    And you know what, it really suits you. Loved the article. Well done you.
     
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  7. caroline_92

    caroline_92 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I have been eating low carb for 7 years now with normal HbA1c - that feels pretty long term to me and unless other health issues arise, I can't see why I can't continue well into the future.
    The insulin resistance may not be 'fixed' but it has gone into hiding
     
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  8. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    Wow actually one giant step for mankind
     
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  9. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Same here - my 7 year diaversary was in March. Normal A1c since 6 months after adopting LCHF. I don't care whether I'm "cured", "reversed", "in remission" or whatever - I just call myself well controlled. Why would I change what I'm doing when it's working to keep complications at bay?
     
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  10. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Article in The Telegraph by Lela London a type 1 for 20 years. Lchf and DCUK get a mention. All good. Also a good article she wrote here on Twitter for info.

    https://twitter.com/lelalondon/status/1121036151685636097

    There are many cultural misconceptions about diabetes – one of the most common being the dangerous assumption that type 1 and type 2 diabetes are one and the same.

    Though it may only seem obvious to diabetics of either type (I write as a type 1 diabetic, having been diagnosed when I was a child over two decades ago), the conditions are 'caused' in very different ways, cared for through largely individual treatment plans, and can become as dangerous as each other if left undiagnosed or untreated.

    Knowledge is power in every area of diabetic care and it is especially important to understand the difference between type 1 and type 2. The latter, particularly, because it is sure to affect someone you know (as you'll see, below).

    What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes?

    Diabetes (technically, diabetes mellitus) typically comes in two forms: ‘type 1’ and ‘type 2’. No awards for creativity. Both are chronic conditions which affect the way the body processes insulin – the handy little hormone which turns carbohydrates and sugar/glucose into energy, regulating blood sugar levels.

    Beyond this, they are largely unrelated.

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease whereby a person’s immune system targets and kills off insulin-producing beta cells.

    Type 2 diabetesis, in short, a condition based on insulin resistance. While the aforementioned beta cells are still alive, they don’t work as well as they should and tend to make less and less insulin as time goes on.

    Though type 2 was once only prevalent in adults (earning itself the moniker 'adult-onset' diabetes), it is now increasingly common for the condition to affect children – particularly those who are overweight or obese.

    According to Diabetes.co.uk, there are currently over four million people living with diabetes in the UK and type 2 diabetes accounts for roughly 90pc of all diabetic cases. This means roughly one in every 18 people suffer from type 2 diabetes.

    Can type 2 diabetes develop into type 1?

    Though many people believe type 2 diabetics can ‘become’ type 1 diabetics, this is not true. They are different diseases. At the same time, type 2s can become insulin-dependent and regulate their blood sugar levels through daily blood monitoring and injections, as all type 1 diabetics have to do.

    If left untreated, type 2 diabetes can increase the risk of cardiovascular conditions and cause blindness, kidney failure, and limb amputations.

    In more severe cases, type 2 diabetics have to inject themselves with insulin to regulate blood sugar levelsCREDIT: ALEX FLYNN/BLOOMBERG

    Symptoms of type 2 diabetes

    It is very common for symptoms of type 2 diabetes to appear gradually, which means that, without the help of medical tests for unrelated issues, it is rarely diagnosed at an early stage.

    Symptoms also vary from type 1 diabetes, which tends to cause extreme fatigue and dehydration when undiagnosed.

    For type 2 diabetics, common symptoms include feeling tired after meals, feeling hungry shortly after eating (polyphagia), urinating more often than normal, itchy skin (particularly around the genitals and especially if you have regular yeast infections), blurred vision, slow healing of cuts, and new skin disorders such as psoriasis or acanthosis nigricans (dark, discoloured skin folds).

    Causes of type 2 diabetes

    Unlike type 1 diabetes, there are many known causes and risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes. Often, a number of contributing factors lead to diagnosis.

    Risk factors include having high blood sugar, cholesterol, excess weight, type 2 in the bloodline, and a prior case of gestational diabetes (which typically disappears post-pregnancy).

    The most prominent and medically-acknowledged cause of type 2 diabetes is a poor diet (which, coincidentally, leads to many of the risks outlined above).

    A number of medications, particularly steroids and statins, have also been linked to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The list includes – but is not limited to – corticosteroids (including those which treat Athsma and Crohn’s disease), thiazides and beta-blockers (often used to treat hypertension), and statins (like Lipitor and Lescol).

    Actor Tom Hanks, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2013, said he was a "total idiot" leading up to his diagnosis by being "part of the lazy American generation that has blindly kept dancing through the party and now finds ourselves with a malady" CREDIT: EDDIE MULHOLLAND

    Still, many people find they're diagnosed with type 2 against the odds. Chris Rooney, a type 2 ultra-marathoner from Huddersfield, told me his own diagnosis, discovered during a routine medical check up, came as a huge shock. "The three biggest risk factors did not apply to me," he said. "I was overweight but not obese, active and exercised regularly, and had no family history of diabetes.

    "However, there was no doubt; my resting blood glucose was 9.7mmol, HbA1C was 66 – definitely diabetic."

    Thankfully, Rooney sent his diabetes "into remission" within three months by committing to the LCHF lifestyle outlined below.

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes

    There are two primary aims of treating type 2 diabetes. Firstly and most imperatively, to control blood glucose levels. Secondly, to ‘cure’ type 2 diabetes altogether.

    Depending on type 2’s personal severity, initial treatment plans range from healthy lifestyle adjustments to tablet medications, injections, and bariatric surgery. When medication is prescribed, yearly diabetic health checks are also put into place to help you avoid long-term complications.

    When you are newly diagnosed or feel your treatment plan needs an update, it is routine for GPs to set up diabetes education, courses and specialist referrals.

    Though type 2 ‘reversal’ has only become a mainstream idea in the last few years, many of the same lifestyle changes used to control blood glucose levels can be put into permanent practice to eliminate the need for medication.

    Often, losing weight is not only a primary goal for those with type 2 diabetes but a choice which improves insulin sensitivity overall. Because of this, balanced low-carbohydrate diets created specifically for type 2 diabetes are regularly touted as a ‘cure’ for the condition.

    An LCHF diet plan has recently gained popularity in type 2 communities for not only helping diabetics to lose weight but lowering their HbA1C (a person’s average blood sugar levels over two to three months) to non-diabetic numbers.

    The diet plan, which stands for Low Carb High Fat, champions whole foods and limits sugar and starch to a minimum. The keto diet falls under this umbrella and, as a particularly extreme form of LCHF, has been medically proven to reduce the need for type 2 diabetes medications. However, it has its own side effects.

    Debra Scott, a type 2 diabetic and activist from Blackpool, said: "I was devastated when I was told I had type 2. I saw it lead to my mum being registered blind, having a stroke, having sores that wouldn't heal and more.

    "I declined the offer of medication and asked the nurse if I could try to find a way through diet. I looked into 'reversing diabetes' and found everyone who was doing it was doing it on a low carbohydrate diet.

    "I started this way of eating on December 8th and my blood glucose levels were in pre-diabetic range by February. By May I was in non-diabetic range and had lost four stone – reaching my goal weight. I've never felt healthier, happier or more confident about myself. My diagnosis has really been a blessing in disguise."

    Many doctors also recommend reducing your alcohol intake and quitting smoking, for obvious reasons, as part of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes treatment.
     
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  11. shelley262

    shelley262 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Congrats to our two forum members getting excellent quotes in there @rhubarb73 and @Debandez well said and really good too for it not to be overly weight focused for a change
     
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  12. masonap

    masonap Type 2 · Active Member

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    Nice article, very well written. I’m type 2 (about 20 years) and I’ve been on insulin for about 3 years. I would like to think that I’m now doing very well, my HbA tests are great, I’ve lost a lot of weight and I now get plenty of exercise.
    The only negative comment I have is concerning the words ‘cure’ ‘reversal’ and ‘remission’ which are frequently used in many posts. I don’t believe any of these things are correct, I believe that once you are diabetic that’s it, however a permanent change in diet and lifestyle will have great positive benefits, even down to no longer needing any medication. It’s a bit like being an alcoholic and it would be easy to ‘revert’ back into a poor lifestyle and therefore be subject to all the potential life changing side effects that poor diabetes control will lead to.
     
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  13. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Have you read The Diabetes Code by Jason Fung. Reversing diabetes is possible. He is an amazing man.
     
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  14. yorkshirelad27

    yorkshirelad27 · Member

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    Hi Debandez,

    I didn't see this thread until after I'd posted earlier today. A great idea to share success stories. I have already put this on before and today and this is an article in which my story was told in the Daily Mail.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/...mic-four-people-reveal-tell-youre-danger.html

    Since the article, I've lost another four pound in weight. More importantly, my GP has taken me off of metformin and ramipril for my high blood pressure. Natalie from the PR side of the diabetes.co.uk site contacted me and today I had a story in the Yorkshire Post and tomorrow the Yorkshire Evening Post. The online link in the Yorkshire Post article is here:

    https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/health/dieting-away-my-diabetes-by-cutting-out-carbs-1-9754091

    My success story in terms of my health is four fold. My sleep apnea has improved, my HBA1C was 39 in March, I don't have IBS any more and my fatty liver that was shown on a scan has improved according to my GP from recent blood results. The journalist that featured my story in the Daily Meal is featuring a story about non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the July edition of the Healthy Food Guide. She is using my story in that too.

    As I put in my recent post I hope people don't see this as bragging from me. It shows how successful a low-carb/ketogenic diet can be and hopefully gives encouragement to those that are pre-diabetic or newly diagnosed with diabetes.
     
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  15. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I knew I need to eat low carb when I was in my early 20s - I am 68 now and have had nothing but advice to the contrary right up to being diagnosed with diabetes in 2016. I can't say I am diabetic now - I can swear to being poorly advised about what is a healthy and safe diet for my requirements.
    I have never had a poor lifestyle either so reverting back to it would not be on the cards.
     
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  16. shelley262

    shelley262 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well done you I’d seen the daily mail one but just read the Yorkshire post one. Great that it focuses on health too and your general well-being improvements. I’ve been featured a fair bit in articles and know what you mean about worrying you may be perceived as boasting but better to take that risk - plus the embarrassment too that comes with publishing your old fat photos and admitting any previous bad habits! We need to get the message out there to help others who then have a real choice about what to do next. When I was diagnosed in 2015 the only message out there was the eatwell plate and exercise more eat high carb low fat and for me this was a disaster - shame I had to struggle until autumn of 2017 before found out about this way of eating. So well done you very important work.
     
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  17. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Expert

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    A great story @yorkshirelad27 and thanks for posting!
     
  18. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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  19. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Bragging? Never.

    We are all doing what we can to help others. The system is letting diabetics down very badly. When I was diagnosed I was given the standard eatwell advice. I was not offered any alternative. Also offered metformin. I declined and asked for 3 months to get my hba1c down from 62 with diet. I googled 'reversing diabetes ' and that's how I came up with the solution. Most people were doing it by lchf woe. I couldn't believe it. It didnt seem difficult. Just a change to the way of eating. I was down to 47 within 2 months! And 39 at my 6 month check. All symptoms subsided within days! With the help of a blood glucose monitor. Lots can be obtained free. Yes the strips cost and luckily I can afford to buy. Not everyone is that lucky. Not everyone has access to internet. It should not be this way.

    Great work on the PR. DCUK have a great PR team who are doing everything to help. They have been amazing.

    I have infiltrated my surgery by joining PPG. That was a great move as they are supporting me with presentations in the community. Also giving me my own room to help fellow diabetics and anyone who wants weight loss advice from my perspective 'this is how I did it'. I started by sending everything I collated for our Birmingham event in to the surgery. Inspirational stories booklet, what have you eaten today booklet, 100 stone lost and kicked diabetes butt sheet, dr David unwin paper and much more. I popped all Drs ,and HCPs names on the front and asked that info should be shown to all. I think this helped too. Still a work in progress. Much to do but we will get there. WE WILL. Currently tweeting like mad. Sharing info on my social media space and doing as much PR as is thrown my way!! I say yes to anything!
     
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  20. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Expert

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