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Confused, concerned and disappointed

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by adamstclare, Dec 16, 2016.

  1. adamstclare

    adamstclare Type 2 · Newbie

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    About 5-6 weeks ago I went to my doctors because I had started to get double vision. I was advised to see an optician, which I did, and was told I needed to see a specialist at the hospital. A week later I had an appointment to see the specialist, whilst at the appointment, a few symptoms I had come up in conversation and I was told to talk to my GP. To cut a long story short after a test I found out I had type 2 diabetes. My GP said they'd refer me to a one day course to teach me what I should eat. Since then I've had an appointment with the DN and the only advice I've been given is...... make sure you use moisturiser on your feet every day! I wonder if others have had a similar experience.
     
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  2. spendercat

    spendercat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yup, that's it.
    To us it's a devastating diagnosis, to our healthcare professionals it's absolutely commonplace. No real system seems to be in place to help us to adjust. Further, there is disagreement between experts on the best way to cope. Diabetes is a self managed illness.
    Thank goodness for this site, you will find everything you need to know, and lots of support here.
     
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  3. Hiitsme

    Hiitsme Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome @adamstclare
    I will tag @daisy1 for her helpful info for newcomers.
    There will be lots there about reducing carbs which increase our blood sugars. Take time to go through it and come back with more questions.
     
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  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Hi and welcome,

    The advice to moisturise your feet is excellent advice. We need to take great care of our feet as diabetics.

    @spendercat is right. This is a self-managed disease. You will get virtually no help from your DN or GP unless you are extremely lucky. The one day course you speak about will just be a reiteration of the NHS "eatwell plate", which is always pushed on us but is quite useless for Type 2s not on insulin. Read round this forum, ask questions, and you will learn all there is to know from fellow diabetics.

    When Daisy's post arrives, do read it carefully, take note of the role of carbohydrates, and look at all the links she provides.
     
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  5. Energize

    Energize Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome @adamstclare

    I seem to remember being told NOT to use any creams etc BETWEEN TOES as damp, warm areas encourage bacteria to grow (which isn't what you want, eh?)

    Using moisturiser creams etc on the rest of your feet is a very good idea. :)
     
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  6. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    welcome here adamstclare so sad the way you are being treated...
    they cant help us much right from the start, except from metformin that only help a little.......
    it is a disease where we must learn to help us self , take control and only eat what is good for us, even their advice when it comes to foods is not adequate to help most type 2 diabetics...
    :shifty::shifty::shifty::shifty::shifty::shifty::shifty::shifty:


    and by the way buy a meter so we know what we are doing when we eat.
     
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  7. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Since being diagnosed and going straight to low carb eating, my feet are no longer swollen, the skin all over me is softer and feels silky. My face is changing - admittedly it is a bit more wrinkly, but my features are more defined, less puffy. I do use moisturiser on my feet, but I wear sandals year round so there is no danger of going mouldy.
    You might have to take the advice on diet with a pinch of salt - but there is a lot of information on the internet about eating low carb to reduce insulin resistance and weight too, as a bonus.
     
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  8. SWUSA_

    SWUSA_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome @adamstclare! Read everything you can-so many good discussions here.
     
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  9. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @adamstclare

    Hello Adam and welcome to the forum :) Here, as mentioned above, is the basic information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. It gives a lot of advice on carbs and low carbing and a link to the Low Carb Program which you could join. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 220,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
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  10. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum. You have come to the right place for helpful information.
     
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  11. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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  12. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    Certainly had the moisturiser and I can give you a tip here. Whatever you do don't put it between your toes since athletes foot will take hold if you do. Then you get another cream to put between your toes to cure that.
     
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  13. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Agreed never put the moisturiser between your toes it could encourage fungal infection like Athletes Foot
     
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  14. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi @adamstclare and welcome to the forum! It is a huge shock when you get that diagnosis and takes a while to get your head around it all. Your experience on diagnosis is much the same as many others. I was just told to cut out sugar and to use moisturiser on my feet and wear shoes indoors to avoid stubbing my toes, I was referred to a DESMOND course for newly diagnose diabetic. I did get a place within a week due to someone cancelling, but many have to wait weeks or months.
    You will learn more on here on how to control your condition. Have a read round the threads and ask any questions you want to, the people on here are friendly and supportive.

    Do you know what your HbA1c (blood sugar) level was on diagnosis? If not you should find out from your GP surgery so you know where you are starting from.
     
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  15. adamstclare

    adamstclare Type 2 · Newbie

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    I was told by the DN that I'll get all my test results in a letter in a few weeks
     
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  16. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    This isn't really good enough. Your surgery already has the test results and you are entitled to a full print out, but you do have to ask for this. Also, if your surgery is up to date, they will have followed the guidelines, which say all surgeries should put medical records on line by April 2016. If you are interested in seeing your results on-line (usually 1 to 2 days after your test) you need to register your interest with the surgery, complete a consent form, provide some ID and away you go. No need to wait weeks for them.
     
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  17. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Except if they are like my GP surgery. I asked for online access to my medical records and submitted the consent form in September, and I still don't have access.
     
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  18. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    The Eatwell Guide is just as useless for those of us on insulin as excess carbs will just cause weight gain.
     
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  19. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    I recently added access to my medical records to my online account and it's really useful. I was able to look at all my blood test results before my DN review this week which meant we didn't have to waste her time telling me them we could just focus on any actions needed; a real benefit.
     
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  20. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    On the bad side don't expect too much from your Doctor or even Diabetic Team, they have to follow out of date dogma - this is not their fault. On this site and others like diet Doctor you will get everything you need to get as well managed with diabetes as you can. Could I suggest that you YouTube Dr Berg, Dr Jason Fung, Dr Michael Mosley and Dr Sarah Hallberg for interesting insights.
     
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