1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

New T2 and freaking out

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Elllen1, Nov 12, 2020.

  1. Elllen1

    Elllen1 · Newbie

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hi,
    I have had some symptoms for a while but managed to brush them off as getting older until I read up on blurry vision and another horrible symptom I won't mention. Didn't want to go to the docs so bought a meter to check what my levels were. Well, 2 hours after my evening meal it read 28.2. I was shocked so did another test in the morning and it was 22. At that point, I sucked it up and arranged a fasting blood test which came back at 20.2. I don't have a follow-up appointment for a week and that seems like a really long time. I am reading a lot on the forum which is really helpful. I know this is all my fault and I am quite ashamed that I let this happen. I have never been slim but when I gave up smoking there has been no restraint on eating and I have gained masses of weight and since last year my exercise has been non-exsitant. I know that it was lurking back there anyway but I almost feel embarrassed to go to my appointment and get judged! Anyone else felt this way?
    I have continued to check blood and last night after dinner was 32.1. this morning 22. 4 Is there a sharp shock diet that is recommended to help reduce this quickly or would it be best to stop checking, try to eat fewer carbs, and wait for my appointment? Sorry if this is a stupid question but I have no clue about this.
     
    • Hug Hug x 5
  2. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,369
    Likes Received:
    14,613
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi @Elllen1 and welcome to the forum!
    First let me say please don’t blame yourself, you may not have had control of your eating and weight but many people do the same but never get type 2, weight gain is often a symptom not a cause.
    Many here myself included got our blood sugars under control and lost a shed load of weight by reducing our carb intake. Here’s a link to the Diet Dr website which is a good place to start. You can get enough info without subscribing:
    https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/a
    Have a read and ask as many questions as you like :)
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Winner Winner x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  3. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,467
    Likes Received:
    3,264
    Trophy Points:
    198
    My husband can eat whatever he wants to. And does. He's thin as a rail and actually, a little underweight for someone so tall. You (and I for that matter) don't process carbs well, and probably haven't for a long, long time. Years, maybe even decades. That's NOT your fault, that's just your genes. And who knows, maybe medication (steroids, statins), or underlying conditions like PCOS. All in all... This is a matter of sooner or later, as you have a genetic predisposition to contend with. This was going to come up, either 10 years ago or 10 years from now, or now... but it was coming. That means you can quit kicking yourself around right now. Others may try to shame you or bully you or whatever, but know this simple truth: You didn't know. You didn't know carbs were a problem for you, and as you didn't know, there was little you could do about it. Most people, when they think of a diet, they go low fat, high carb. I did, with the hospital's dietician pushing more bread down my throat. And that's the exact opposite of what our bodies need.

    So.

    Here.

    Have a clean slate.

    Grab on to it, and start over.

    So, you start here: Practically all carbs turn to glucose once ingested. So you cut carbs. Do that, and your blood glucose will come down. Forget everything you think you know about healthy eating, because it doesn't apply to people with a metabolic condition. And right now, that's you. No grains, spuds, cereals, fruits (save for berries, granted), corn, bread, pasta, rice etc. That's all out the window, as you're asking for a diet to fix this. https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/blog-entry/the-nutritional-thingy.2330/ should help you sort out your next grocery run, and how best to test (strips are expensive and you don't want to waste them). There's three macro nutrients, carbs, fats and protein, and when you cut one, you up the others. That means bacon and eggs are back on the menu. Fish, meat, butter and hard cheeses contain little to no carbs, depending on how processed they are. Above ground veggies and leafy greens are usually okay, though some have a problem with pulses: your meter'll tell you. Underground veggies are best avoided. Some nuts are better than others, so that's worth looking into maybe. Olives, extra dark chocolate, that sort of thing. But that's it in a nutshell... When you check a nutritional label, go for the "total carbs", NOT "of which sugars", because starches turn to glucose too. You want the total, not the breakdown. Keep that low and you're all good.

    Also, carbs retain water. That means when you drastically cut carbs, you will feel like a trainwreck for a while. It's called keto- or carb flu, where you get a little dehydrated as the electrolytes you need are flushed out while you pee for England fo a week or two. Get yourself some electrolyte supplements and pop them every day, to keep headaches, fatigue and sore joints at bay. In that time your vision'll also be blurry, because your brain's been compensating for the glucose in your eyeballs/tears, which has been distorting your vision for a while. It needs to stop compensating, and it takes a little while. So if you keep having problems with your eyes, get cheap reading specs, because going for a new pair of expensive glasses is just chucking money down the drain. As long as your bloods aren't back down and stable, having an eye-test (well, that sort of test anyway) serves no purpose. So hold off on that until your bloods are stable.

    All in all.... It'll be tough going for a bit, but take this to heart: I was running similar numbers to yours when first diagnosed. I was off medication in about 3 months, and back into the normal range, where I've been these past 4 years. It CAN be done. And you'll feel better for it. (Not to mention you'll shed a lot of weight in the process. Yay, bacon! ;) ). Mind you, I could've cut out the medication a lot sooner, my endo just wasn't very open minded and didn't believe I'd keep this diet up long-term. Shame on her. ;)

    You'll be okay. Okay? So please stop beating yourself up. This is a new day, you're motivated as heck, and you WILL get through this and feel better, and sooner than you think, too.

    Hugs,
    Jo
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Winner Winner x 2
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  4. Arab Horse

    Arab Horse Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    886
    Likes Received:
    1,024
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Hi and welcome to the club.

    I too had a wake up call. I was a biochemist so knew the symptoms but can honestly say I had none of them.Working in labs years ago we used to do our own bloods and you could have set the normal range by my results. Wikh the advent of all the space age technology, multi channel, computer driven analysers with audit trails for everything came into labs and we could no longer do that and I never went to the doctor: I hadn't had a blood test for about 15 years.

    I then had a letter from the surgery to say they were giving free health checks so decided (as I was very fit and healthy!) I would go and have one to prove how healthy I was. The first part was to collect a form and have a (non fasting) blood test which I duly did one Saturday morning.

    When I got home from work at 6.30 pm on the Tuesday there were 3 messages on the answer phone and before I could listen to them the phone rand and it was the receptionist who said I needed to go in and get a form to have some fasting bloods done as my glucose was high, the three messages were asking me to ring the surgery ASAP. When I asked her what my glucose was she didn't know so I duly collected a form and had my fasting bloods done on the Saturday.

    The next Tuesday when I got home from work, same scenario, this time it was the diabetic nurse. When I asked her what my results were she said "Would it mean anything to you if I told you" so I said "Yes, i am a biochemist, that's my job". I couldn't believe what she told me; HbA1c 10.4 and glucose 18.6. I was gobsmacked as I literally had no symptoms.

    Your results are astronomical, you should be seen ASAP but in the meantime CUT THE CARBS. LIVE ON PROTEIN AND LOW CARB VEG. I wasn't overweight and was very active (rushing around all day at work) but just cutting the carbs I went from eight and three quarter stone to just over 7 stone in a month.

    If you are interested I went from cereal with milk, a seed sprinkle and fresh fruit for breakfast to bacon, eggs, mushrooms, fried tomatoes. My coffee stayed the same; very strong, black and no sugar (the only part of my diet that stayed the same). The secret is NO (OR ALMOST NO) CARBS. I hated it at first but soon got used to it. Still miss my chips, cakes, puddings, etc as my husband still eats all the things I love in front of me so we shop, cook and eat separately.

    I have never been able to go back to eating "normally" as I guess I was diabetic too long for that. I think the only reason I didn't have all the side effects was because I was so active and wasn't over weight.

    Sorry for the essay but hope you find it useful and have a good diabetic nurse. Useful although I occasionally interpreted things for my nurse when it was something unusual!!!!.

    Footnote: I am now 76 and have just had 2 operations for breast cancer and start my radio therapy in a week (elected not to have chemo as it would only have been marginally helpful but with a lot of nasty side effects so, at my age, not worth it). I feel fit and well and do all the things I did before including looking after my horses and cats.
     
    • Hug Hug x 8
    • Like Like x 1
    #4 Arab Horse, Nov 12, 2020 at 11:57 AM
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2020
  5. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,110
    Likes Received:
    497
    Trophy Points:
    143
    @Arab Horse,
    I just want to give you a hug and also say that you are a winner!

    It is so easy to assume we are in good metabolic health until we either get symptoms or get a surprise blood test like you did.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
    • Hug Hug x 1
  6. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

    Messages:
    11,635
    Likes Received:
    7,033
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi. Those readings are very high and could be dangerous if not reduced. You must reduce the carbs you eat way down and see how you do. Have plenty of water and If you feel unwell go to A&E.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  7. Elllen1

    Elllen1 · Newbie

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Thank you for the responses, really helped me get started. My doc called and put me on Metformin ahead of my follow up. I have now cleansed my cupboards and refilled with low carb foods and my daughter is going to follow with me. I’m sure it will be a bit of trial and error, I still have a lot to learn but I don’t feel as overwhelmed.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 1
  8. LaoDan

    LaoDan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    480
    Likes Received:
    320
    Trophy Points:
    103
    That’s the path, I went zero carb when first diagnosed. Blood sugar levels dropped off pretty quick. Stick with the plan, test your meals. Maybe experiment with intermittent fasting, My new eating patterns are habit, life is good.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Newtothisstuff

    Newtothisstuff · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Hi this sounds just like me. Got a T2 diagnosis on Thursday and haven’t stopped reading since then. Feel overwhelmed and scared that I’m still eating things I shouldn’t. I’ve ditched all bad things from cupboards ordered a Hairy Bikers T2 cookbook. I don’t even know what levels mean but Dr told me I was 94, she said very high and has put me on metformin. I’ve had symptoms but brushed these off as “nothing” but lost eye sight in one eye suddenly a few weeks ago (posterior vitreous detatchment - bleed behind eye) sight slowly returning and T2 was picked up during tests. I’m seeing diabetic nurse on Monday so hopefully she will help me with all the things I’m unsure about. I’ve been reading about the Newcastle diet wiht the shakes etc, appears they don’t do it on NHS in my area, but guess you can pay privately and get it. Anyone done this and where do you go to get on it? Thanks this forum has been so helpful already
     
    • Hug Hug x 2
  10. LaoDan

    LaoDan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    480
    Likes Received:
    320
    Trophy Points:
    103
    My diagnosis was 9.4 % , pretty high too. I ate smoked salmon, eggs, avocados , various meats, I was back in a normal range within 90 days. I opted out seeing a nutritionist. I needed to eat foods I liked during that time. I probably wouldn’t have stuck with a special calorie restricted diet
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

    Messages:
    11,635
    Likes Received:
    7,033
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi. If I were you I would just focus on keeping the carbs down and have enough fats and proteins to keep you feeling full. It's not about Calories or Low-Fat. The Newcastle Diet may help but it's focussed around Calories which will not be optimal.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

    Messages:
    8,075
    Likes Received:
    4,873
    Trophy Points:
    198
    My Hba1c was 91 at diagnosis and after going low carb from that moment I was no longer diabetic in 80 days.
    I started eating low carb in the 1970s, but doctors and dieticians raved against it and insisted their way was the only way to stay alive. I had been eating low fat, high carb foods for almost two years at diagnosis. A low carb way of eating makes me feel so much better, and I have been in remission for several years now.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  13. Ceppo

    Ceppo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I'd strongly recommend the Caldesi Diabetes cookbooks with useful introductions by Dr Unwin and a nutritionist. Delicious recipes and all carb, fat, etc counted. I don't know if the Hairy Biker's book is Low Carb. Reviews on Amazon say it is the same recipes as in their diet cookbook. Good luck.
     
  14. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,369
    Likes Received:
    14,613
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I just looked at a sample of the Hairy Bikers book and no they don’t appear to be low carb. I quickly spotted ingredients that many low carbers wouldn’t eat, like, pasta, beans, bananas, maple syrup and fruit smoothies.
    It seems to concentrate on low fat, low cal etc... unfortunately.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  15. Arab Horse

    Arab Horse Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    886
    Likes Received:
    1,024
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Thank you, hug back. Hope your glucose comes down soon; it takes a bit of time to see if you will be able to introduce other foods. Sadly I can't but my glucose doesn't go quite so high and recovers more quickly when I fall off the wagon, usually when I am stressed about something. When I start my radio therapy on Monday week I am going to be "really good" and try some fasting. I quite often only eat breakfast and lunch but might try only having breakfast or even going a day without anything at the weekend as my radio therapy is Monday to Friday so I could do a Saturday or Sunday as I don't want to do it when I have to drive.
     
  16. Choosehappy

    Choosehappy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    204
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Hi Elllen1

    It is really scary when first diagnosed and you have lots of different emotions. But I want to tell you that it has now been 2 weeks since my diagnosis of type 1 and I am already feeling so much better and more positive! I quit my e-cigarette and I have the healthiest diet now with no added sugars! All these changes in just 2 weeks! At first it was extremely hard and there was lots of crying because when I got stressed or sad I couldn’t just smoke my ecig or get some sweets which would usually make me feel better in a stressful situation, however now I realise all I need to get me through is me and a positive mentality!

    you can do this! And this was not your fault!! How many people abuse their bodies forever more right into their 80s!! Life is a spinning wheel and some get and some don’t but everyone gets a share of good and bad. But we can turn the bad into good! Once you have your diagnosis ect you can become the healthiest version of yourself!!

    keep us updated x
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  17. Debz24

    Debz24 Type 2 · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Hi I am in the same boat as you,been T2 for a year had it controlled,lost a bit of weight but my last blood test which was approx one month ago showed my glucose was to high so now I have to take 1 slow release metaformin twice a day as normal but now I have to take Glimepiride 1mg everyday with breakfast.i am not coping well with my diabetes and feel very limited in what I can eat,I do have other health issues like fatty liver,thyroid,high blood pressure and fast heart rate as well as having bad bought of depression so coping with all these health conditions is wearing me down.i can totally relate to you when it comes to food I like as it’s the same as your likes and my BG before breakfast was 22.9 and after breakfast which was one slice of toast,scrambled eggs and beans and a coffee with no sugar was 29.2,I just feel so lost and hard to cope with.
     
  18. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

    Messages:
    8,075
    Likes Received:
    4,873
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Do you need to eat bread and beans? They are both high carb, and that will not help your diabetes or your liver.
     
  19. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,467
    Likes Received:
    3,264
    Trophy Points:
    198
    The additional conditions you mention could mostly be tucked away under the "Metabolic Syndrome" umbrella. They go hand-in-hand with diabetes. The fatty liver disease, high blood pressure.... If you cut down on the carbs, those things will be affected too. My NAFLD was so bad they thought my liver was a giant tumor, and now my liverfunction is absolutely normal. And my blood pressure's actually rather low now. Also... With a bunch of conditions comes depression, yes, but... High blood sugars impact your mood as well, can make depression exponentially worse, anxiety and panic attacks too... So you really, really need to have a good look at what you're eating.

    And yeah, it does feel limiting, when you're only looking at the things you can't eat (or shouldn't, really.... You still can of course, the choice is yours), like bread and pasta, the beans might not be such a hot idea either. But there's so much that's still on the menu! Or back on it, as a lot of people rediscover bacon. ;) https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/blog-entry/the-nutritional-thingy.2330/ Have a read, it might help. Do keep in mind that if you go low carb, high fat, the glim can make you go hypo, so do test a lot...!!!

    It's worth a try, no?
    Jo
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook