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Recently diagnosed with Type 1 and feeling depressed

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Lini94, Aug 25, 2019.

  1. Lini94

    Lini94 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi everyone,

    I'm Lini. I'm 25 years old from Australia.

    I've never posted on a forum like this before but am seeking a bit of help coming to terms with my diagnosis.

    I got diagnosed with Type 1 earlier this year and haven't been handling it very well. It was so unexpected. I live such a healthy and active lifestyle which led me to believe (with my misunderstanding of what actually causes type 1) that i would never have to deal with a health issue like this.

    Since that point i've been in a downward spiral. I just can't imagine how i'm going to find any happiness in my life living with type 1. I feel like i'm never going to be able to lead a normal life, have fun with my friends, go backpacking, go out partying etc. I wake up every morning thinking about how my life is over because of this and it's going to stop me from doing everything I want. I feel like my future's been taken away from me and that all the best parts of my life are now over.

    I've been speaking to my psychologist about these difficulties. But I also wanted to reach out on this forum to see if anyone has struggled with depression and type 1 and how they got through it. Are there any diabetics on here who went on anti-depressants after being diagnosed?

    I know maybe i'm sounding over-dramatic, but these are the things that are constantly going through my head since being diagnosed and it's been really hard to stop thinking like this.
     
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    #1 Lini94, Aug 25, 2019 at 10:13 AM
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2019
  2. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi and welcome to the forum.
    I’m so sorry you are struggling with your type 1 diagnosis, any diagnosis can be a shock. I’m Type 2 so can’t offer practical support but I can give a hug.
    I’ll tag in some fellow moderators and a couple of members who are type 1, hopefully they’ll be along soon for you.
    @Juicyj , @Diakat , @urbanracer ,
    @Mel dCP and @helensaramay .
     
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  3. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello, welcome, sending you a big squishy hug!
    There are a number of us who are long term diabetics, I myself is one of them. I've been diagnosed at a quite young age in 2001. Insulin varieties were not that vast and we didn't have the technology like libre sensors back then. However, we survived. Yes it was a struggle, I rebelled against my condition which put my family and me through a lot of stress. My mum watched me go through DKA several times and I guess you can say I'm lucky that I walked away with just severe mouth infections which has scarred my mouth and changed my appearance. Although my mummy and my bf both still say I'm beautiful, it wasn't worth messing up diabetes for it. But hey, I'm doing a lot better now with the new insulins and new technology and the type 1 squad here are fantastic if you want a shoulder to cry on. We are all here for you, you're not alone. Diabetes didn't stop us, some are us have families, have jobs, been to university and did remarkable achievements.
    I will tag a few friends: @Diakat @Knikki @Mel dCP @Fairygodmother
    @helensaramay @Juicyj
    I also like to note that I've been on antidepressants for depression and anxiety because my condition has pushed people away when I was at university and I was quite alone throughout my time there. Antidepressants didn't do much for me, I think the side effects were horrible and I didn't feel any benefits of the drug.
     
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  4. Lini94

    Lini94 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi, Thank you so much for you support and helping me navigate the forum, i really appreciate it. <3
     
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  5. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Another thing is, have you looked at Theresa May? She was our prime minister and she has type 1. I applaud her for handling all the stress and demands of her job.
     
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  6. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome, Lini from a fellow Australian. I've struggled to accept my diagnosis. Like you, I was extremely health-conscious and active. You're on the right path posting here and speaking to a psychologist, as it means that you're starting to deal with it. I've only just signed up for a psychologist last week, the first time I've admitted that I really have type 1 and need help, though my diagnosis was two years ago.
    There are a number of blogs worth following to see how type 1's can do anything. Here's a start from 27-year-old Aussie supermodel Bambi:
    https://beyondtype1.org/supermodel-bambi-type-1-diabetes/
     
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  7. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hello @Lini94 and welcome to the forum :)

    I too felt exactly the same as you when I was diagnosed, it was like falling into a well of depression that I couldn't climb out of, mine really hit rock bottom around 6 months so I joined up with a meditation group which helped lift me, it's was the feeling of being constantly over whelmed, I was also trying to juggle being a mum and work full time. Since then I also discovered running and got myself outside for long walks too.

    What your feeling is normal, it's like a grieving process, yes life will never be the same true, but with a bit of planning it becomes easier to still live your life and achieve your dreams, however it helps to learn as much as you can, find a passion so something you enjoy doing and keep talking, use the forum to make friends and find people who understand that you can lean on, here you have abundance of folk who know exactly what your experiencing but lead 'normal' lives and keep their t1 in control.

    I run 3 times a week now use a pump and the Dexcom G6 which is a continuous glucose monitor, I also ride a road bike, swim, ski, have done a parachute jump, have just climbed a mountain, my attitude now to when I suffered depression after my diagnosis is completely different, it does get a lot easier so take your time, be kind to yourself and you will be fine x
     
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  8. Mel dCP

    Mel dCP Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hey :)

    Welcome to the club none of us wanted to join.... I was diagnosed at a similar age to you, in my mid 20s, and like you, it came out of nowhere. I had a gastric flu virus which decided to shelter in my pancreas and my oh-so-helpful immune system nuked the whole lot :rolleyes: That was twenty years ago now.

    Like you, I initially felt that my life was over - the obstacles seemed insurmountable. Being an internal organ is hard work, and we don’t appreciate what we had until it’s gone, that’s for sure. There is a school of thought that says when we have a diagnosis of a long term condition that we go through the classic stages of grief - denial, anger, bargaining, depression and finally acceptance.

    But, it doesn’t have to stop you living an amazing life - so far I’ve got three biology degrees, a very healthy child, a silversmithing business, rode my motorcycle around Europe, travelled to many countries, been a freelance photographer, science teacher and now I’m about to start training as a paramedic.

    T1 is a pain in the bum, that’s for sure - but it’s handleable. I had some major issues with depression and burnout along the way, antidepressants helped when it was at its worst. Actually, peer support from this forum has really helped me - I avoided the diabetes online community for years (denial), and I wish I’d dived in sooner!

    Huge hugs if you want one x
     
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  9. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello.
    Sorry that you are feeling bad right now. It is understandable and rational. You have a chronic disease not of your making and will now have to deal with it and the risks of complications that it comes with.
    You are young and resourceful and have already found help here and via the psychologist. You've probably had life situations before that were overwhelming and tough but you dealt with them (exams, new jobs etc.) however they were probably all fairly common ones so you may have just got on with it like everyone does. Type 1 is more isolating by its rarity (1%) and that on top of the nature of the diabetic beast (24-7 self care, guilt/anger) can turn inwards leading towards depression. If you need a pharma crutch I'd say go for it but I think you're wise to reach out for peer and professional support too.
    I took fluoxetine (prozac/ssri inhibitor) when in my 20s (had been diagnosed as a child) but it all went wrong when I went to uni. It gave me the energy to find better solutions than the eating disorder I developed (many reasons for this btu being put on a restrictive diet and weighed a lot as a young teen did not help). Made it through and am proud of what I've achieved in spite of, or perhaps because of, this obstacle in my life.

    The more you practice good self care habits the less diabetes will interfere with getting on with your life. I think it just feels like a total pain in tbe beginning because it is all new and tricksy plus very individual. At least you have some very good tech on your side to help!
    Hope these posts will give you a little bit of faith, hope and courage to keep going.
     
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  10. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @Lini94 (and thanks @MeiChanski ),
    Excellent advice from everyone above. Acceptance is key, mental health matters and you matter. You’ve made the first move so now you can start working out how to improve things. X
     
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  11. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Linl94 welcome! Great advice already. Re the mental side, I would say the first thing is acceptance that no matter how healthy you were or how you lived your life you could not stop this happening. Do not beat yourself up. It is a whole new way of living, difficult at first, but eventually second nature and it should not stop you doing anything. In the long run I think I am healthier than most of my contemporaries as I have to really look after myself. Please do not get bogged down in worrying about complications. It is the exception rather than the rule. As you already lead a healthy life I am sure you will not let yourself go.
     
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  12. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, Lini, that's exactly how I felt when I was dx'd aged 20, but as time went by and I learned more about insulin worked, I ended up doing all those things: out clubbing till 3am in my 20s and 30s, away backpacking in Eastern Europe for 4 months and South East Asia for 6 months in my 30s.

    Sure, T1s do need to pay more attention to certain things, but once you've got the basics of insulin action under your belt, life can be remarkably normal.

    You'll face a whole variety of eating situations over the next few months. What tends to happen is that, slowly but surely, and with a few mistakes along the way, you will start to realise, right, I can handle that situation after all - store that information away and confidence increases as time goes by.

    Good luck!
     
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  13. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Expert

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    @Linl94 diabetes diagnosis is nasty. But it is not the end of the world. It does not mean an end to having fun with friends, backpacking or partying. In my experience it means carrying on with all these things and more after a little bit of extra preparation.
    This was put into context when I went canoeing with my boyfriend. We both had to remember sun screen. I had to remember diabetes kit. He had to remember hay fever medication and seasickness pills (he got sea suck on a pedalo so a day on any small boat is a risk). Many people deal with seasickness and hay-fever. I only had diabetes.
    When I was first diagnosed, my DSN told me diabetes should not stop me dound what I want. I have tested that advice lots of times with unusual travel (Nepal, Uganda, Georgia,...) and including the unrecognisable food along the way, I have tried all sorts of sports from climbing to sailing to mountain biking to sky diving and flying trapeze, I have partied to the level that resulted in very bad hangovers, I have dated, I have a challenging career,...
    And when I thinjk diabetes is getting in the way, I think of Oscar winning actor with type 1, International try scoring rugby players with type 1 diabetes, pop musicians with type 1 diabetes and an ex prime minister with type 1 diabetes.

    All that or more is still available to you if you want. But don't rush dealing with the grief of part of your body dying. It's natural and reasonable to be struggling mentally with it.

    Take care of yourself. Not just the diabetes bits: all of you. The non-diabetes bit are more that the diabetes bit so don't let diabetes take over.
     
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  14. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi @Lini94 ,

    Welcome to the forum.. You got some great advice so far.

    Well? I was diagnosed T1 as.a kid. For me I know no different. However. Nobody ever told me otherwise because I am..
    Pack packing India, done that. Toured 16 years fronting a "Euro metal band" yep.. The list adds up.
    & absolutly useless info without he pictures to back it up. Lol, I got some of it on vinyl.

    It takes planning, but one would be mindful of personal safety on such ventures anyway...
    Keep asking the questions.

    & most of all. Enjoy life & the company of your friends.
     
  15. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    The only thing I want to add is that I was happy when I was diagnosed! Not because I had type 1 who wants that, but because I was finally diagnosed right and it made complete sense. See the thing is, it's a pretty easy solve. We just need insulin and the world gets pretty darn good. Sure you have to pay more attention than most people when you eat and exercise but at least we can!
     
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  16. TIGERLILY1991

    TIGERLILY1991 Type 1 · Member

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    Hi @Lini94

    I'm sorry to hear about your diagnosis. I am a similar age to you (28) and have also been recently diagnosed.

    If you need to rant or share stories, please feel free to contact me privately. Also I have started a very honest blog about my journey and what it's like living with Diabetes as a young woman.

    Either way, you are not alone. This forum has been a godsend for me in coming to terms with my diagnosis and hopefully it will be for you too.

    Jxx

    Moderator edited to remove link.
     
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    #16 TIGERLILY1991, Aug 27, 2019 at 10:07 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 28, 2019
  17. KesLouise

    KesLouise · Member

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    Hi there

    I’ve also recently been diagnosed and feel the same way. I’m working with local services to turn things around. It’s hard to dig yourself out of a hole when you feel this way but I think knowing you’re not alone and there’s people out here you can talk to might bring a little ray of hope.

    As above, happy to chat any time
     
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  18. Abz abdul

    Abz abdul · Newbie

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    Hi Lini just wanted to say I felt exactly the same way after being diagnosed as I’ve never had any health conditions in the past so this was a shock for me. Total loss of confidence and not wanting to go out and really depressed etc... I have been on antidepressants prescribed by my doc but it hasn’t helped me a lot hence talking on this forum and getting used to my condition and accepting it was one of the fundamental objective I had to get through. I still do feel down sometimes but I always remember that I have my family and friends around me. Hopefully u feel
    Better
     
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