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Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by H7DNA, Dec 15, 2018.

  1. H7DNA

    H7DNA Type 2 · Member

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    Hi folks,
    My name is Andy, and was 50 years old in July gave up smoking in May 2014 this is my first posty thing on here, I have read lots of different things written on here and I am now both shocked and surprised by the different result from meter readings, I was told I was type 2 in July this year and was given tablets to take 3 day and that I would be refereed to a specialist for further chats (not happened yet) also in August was told have ulcerative colitis up until yesterday I had spoken to no-one re this either now I have no change he only confirmed I have it and offered me yet another prescription to take, not taking this one if I am honest looks like it does more harm than good! More interested in getting this type 2 under control my machine arrived yesterday so give it ago like you do with a new gadget first reading......24.3 and then an hour ago 16.1 - reading some of your meter results mine is way up there HELP..................................How do i get it somewhere near normal and how serious is 16.1 what is the ideal score I would be aiming for? And best time to be testing myself how many times a day. I have already picked up some points like 2 hours after breakfast, no potatoes (I love my tattys) !!
     
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  2. Boo1979

    Boo1979 Other · Well-Known Member

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    Hi & welcome to the forum
    Here are some useful bits of information to be getting on with
    https://www.diabetesdaily.com/learn...s-diet/how-to-start-a-low-carb-diabetes-diet/
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetes_care/blood-sugar-level-ranges.html
    https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng28
    The blood sugar range for non diabetics, is usually within the range of 4-8, the target for diabeics is to get as close to that as possible using diet and medication as necessary. 16 is a very high level, and I would advise seeing your doctor asap - the medication you are on seems not to be working if you are getting those kind of BG readings. If you take multiple readings per day, mainly first thing in the morning and then before and 2 hrs after meals, that will give you and your doctor a good picture.
    @daisy1 Will send an info pack too
     
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    #2 Boo1979, Dec 15, 2018 at 11:49 AM
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2018
  3. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum. yep, 16 and 24 are high levels for a type 2 so get some advice from your GP but also consider if you could take some of the dietary advice offered on this site or Diet Doctor because as a type 2 your higher blood sugars are caused by insulin resistance and insulin resistance can be much improved by diet/exercise whereas with the exception of metformin, most drugs don't tackle this underlying resistance and excess insulin problem. Metformin works by stopping your liver chugging out lots of glucose but unless your meter is wrong or you are testing just after eating a Mars bar or testing without washing hands first, those sugars are high.

    Don't panci but do go and get a nurse or GP appointment. Ask about when to test etc. (are you self funded?) and if your other condition is likely to impact upon your diabetes? But I think you are right that you should focus on the diabetes and think there is loads you can improve by the use of dietary change so think positive!
     
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  4. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi OP. Welcome to what is probably the very first most informative and welcoming diabetes community you’ll find anywhere on the internet. This place is full of warm-hearted and extremely experienced diabetics. You’re in safe hands here and you’ll find nothing but empathy and incredibly useful information along every step of your journey.

    I’m not going to blind you with too much information straight away, but when you feel comfortable, use these forums to begin researching low-carb eating and intermittent fasting. Combined, there is no quicker or more effective strategy for kicking type 2 diabetes square in the n*ts.

    But the first thing I recommend is to buy The Diabetes Code by Dr. Jason Fung. If I’d read this book straight away I would have reversed my diabetes at least 18 months sooner. It’s also available as an audiobook. Good luck, and don’t be shy to ask as many questions as you like. We are here to help :D
     
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  5. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi @H7DNA ,

    Welcome to the forum.

    Your fresh out the box BG meter is your new best friend..
    Used wisely, it will serve you well determining what works & more importantly what don't. (Diet wise, you'll be surprised.)

    All the best!
     
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  6. Spl@

    Spl@ Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome.

    Pre diabetic myself and never seen my own numbers that high. Have seen double figure a couple of times in the early days.
    This forum has changed my life quite literally.
    Since October I'm down 24lb from 38 to a 32 waist and last night as a treat we had fish and chips. Single portion split between us and only went from 4.8 to 7.

    They know...
     
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  7. Major Buckmaster

    Major Buckmaster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Don't disregard UC as nothing. It's a very serious condition. Take your meds!
     
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  8. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Nothing to add to the good advice given above. Can I ask do you know what your HBA1C result was when diagnosed in July and when you will have your next test?
     
  9. H7DNA

    H7DNA Type 2 · Member

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    Hi Alison,
    sadly unless I miss heard my doc he told me I was type 2 and that I would be referred to a specialist diabetes person as of yet I have heard nothing from anyone, I was also diagnosed with Colitus in August and up to yesterday I had heard nothing more of that however did see consult yesterday for that who confirmed yes I had colitis prescribed me some stuff for that, had no wish to talk about my diabetes. All in all not exactly helpful. I am going to book further appointment with the Doctor as I would like a little help! mood swings are a little erratic! I probably have not taken this quite as serous as perhaps I should of done! Like many I though hey ho type 2 diabetes not so bad and carried on working and living regardless! Now given that I work in a seasonal industry (Holiday Park in Cromer) I have a few months realizing my own ignorance to try and put tings right before I explode! lol But in answer to your question I have no idea what HBA1C result was then or is now? all I have is to meter reading one from 3ish yesterday 24.4 and one from 10.30 this morning 16.1 of a machine I purchased online the other day. Sorry not much help I guess
     
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  10. Ann1982

    Ann1982 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome to the forum. I will tag @daisy1 who should be able to offer some good info and advice.
     
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  11. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Hi, you can get your blood test results online if you have registered with your Practice for that service (it comes in very handy). It is easy to register, just take a couple of bits of ID, one must be photo ID along to the Practice with you and request. If not you can request a print out of your test results at reception. The government has said all surgeries must comply.

    Having your results allows you to keep track of your progress and anything you might not be sure about can be explained/interpreted here by forum members who are a dab hand at 'medicalese'. Good luck.
     
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  12. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi andy.

    Similar story to many, get told....get pills...end of ....until next check up time.

    you arrived here for a reason, Andy, most likely to find information and ways to help YOU deal with being Diabetic.
    .
    Sure the diagnosis is not what one wishes...BUT now you know... YOU can do something about.

    But WHAT i hear you ask..

    Well hopefully, with just a little of your time, you'll learn of the things to be aware of with diabetes, how the meds can work and just what are BETTER food choices for us Diabetics.

    That i believe, will go a long to way to helping yourself, achieve a better level of health, then i think you otherwise would.

    After all, knowledge is king.


    I arrived here back in october, ignorant of the impact diabetes can have IF left alone.

    The Good people here pointed to me to
    * sites to read,
    * videos to watch,
    and
    * food choices that MIGHT be better for ME.

    So far my experience has been extremely positive.
    My blood levels, weight loss & general upswing in my entire mood has come from listening to the advice given here,.....( from those who HAVE practised what they preach,)
    forming my own opinion, and putting into action some of those very practices given by the membership.

    i started with the reason you came here..i just wanted Information.

    And if your like me, it's that information that will make you visit again.
    but it's the warmth and friendship, that will make a visit a normal part of your day.

    With the best will in the world, family members and friends, unless they also suffer, won't 'Get' this.
    And i found that world pretty lonely.

    But now i'm not alone, i have somewhere to turn for advice and support, from people who do 'Get' how it feels.

    Welcome to the Forum.
     
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  13. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @H7DNA Andy,

    And welcome to the site.

    Sheesh, T2 and UC? You really, REALLY need to get those referrals. People tend to slip through the cracks, but you might want to put in a call on monday about the status of those referrals, because I have a feeling they were never put through. You have two serious conditions that need looking after.

    I can't say much about the colitis, but I do know eating low carb, which would help with the diabetes, reduces inflammations, so I'm hoping it could make a difference there too... Just a sec, let me check something. Yeah, you might want to read this:

    https://www.dietdoctor.com/lchf-set-free

    Rheumatism and certain foodintolerances are inflammation issues too, and mine got better on a Keto diet (very low carb), which I started for my T2. So it may be something to look into, not just for your diabetes.

    Okay, so Type 2. Your numbers are high, and should ideally be between about 4.5 and 8. Not exact numbers, mind you, because I am a sieve, but that's what people who are functioning normally hover around, and those target numbers would mean no damage is being done to your insides. As a T2, you can't process glucose out efficiently anymore. You're making loads of insulin, but it doesn't do what it's supposed to, so it just floats around your bloodstream, doing damage to eyes, kidneys, veins, nerveendings, what have you. So the numbers you're seeing on your meter are cause for action, really. So what causes a rise in glucose? Carbs. Practically all of 'em, are turned to glucose once ingested, so it's not just straight sugar to look out for, but starches too.

    I don't know what pills you're on and whether they lower bloodsugar (If it's metformin it just tells the liver to take it easy with the glucose-dumping for the most part), but if you are on hypo-inducing meds, please be careful and if possible do this in agreement with someone in the medical profession. (Though with the way things are going, I think shopping for a new GP might be merited... Honestly, they've left you hanging...!).

    So, foods that spike levels are: potatoes, rice, pasta, cereals, bread, and fruit (Save for berries, avocado's and tomatoes. Berries and tomatoes in moderation though). I know that leaves rather big gaping holes in anyone's diet, but you're left with enough to fill up on: Meat, poultry, fish, above ground veggies/leafy greens, eggs, butter, nuts, cheese, olives, full fat greek yoghurt, extra dark chocolate, double cream...

    Meals could look like this:
    Scrambled eggs with bacon, cheese, mushrooms, tomatoes, maybe some high meat content sausages?
    Omelet with cream, erythritol (sweetener) and cinnamon. Side of berries, nuts and coconut shavings. (Maybe another dash of unsweetened cream there)
    Leafy green salad with a can of tuna (oil, not brine), mayo, avocado, capers and olives
    Leafy green salad with half-melted goat's cheese, and a nice vinaigrette (maybe with some pine nuts and stuff tossed in)
    Meat, fish or poultry with cauliflower rice or broccoli rice, with bacon and cheese, and whatever herbs you fancy tossed in.

    Snacks could be pork scratchings, cheese, olives, extra dark chocolate (Lindt 85% is nice)... Of course, www.dietdoctor.com had loads of ideas, and diabetes.co.uk has a bunch of recipies as well. Knock yourself out! Naturally, you could opt to fast, (intermittent fasting) so to skip breakfast or something... I usually just have tea in the morning unless I have to eat due to certain meds.

    You already have a meter, so: Check before a meal and 2 hours after the first bite. If you go up more than 2.0 mmol/l in the meantime, the meal was carbier than you could handle. Otherwise, it's something you can put on your "safe" list. ;) A fooddiary might help as well. And considering the colitis, you might want to add how that's progressing alongside what's been eaten and your glucosenumbers as well. Who knows, a patern may emerge.

    With numbers like yours, a dramatic reduction in bloodsugrs might trigger a false hypo, so if you're feeling off, check what your levels are doing before panicking; if your body is used to high numbers it freaks out when you hit what others would consider normal/healthy. If you're under 4 though, (like I said, I don't know your meds and a true hypo can occur), you might want to grab a cookie or two. Also, lowering bloodglucose from where you're starting out from can affect your vision, as there's glucose in your eyes and it distorts quite a bit. So if things get blurry for a while, don't run to get a new perscription, because it won't last for long. (Cheap reading glasses might help in the interim.). And you might experience flu-like symptoms if you dive into this with gusto, achy joints and muscles, headaches etc, as your body adjusts and detoxes. Lasts for a few days to two weeks, but it is so very, very worth it. It also could mean peeing a lot, so you want to add some extra salt to your diet and drink a lot, because well, carbs hold on to water, and without them, your body loses water-weight. And with the water, salt/electrolytes flush out with it, so you could get a little dehydrated. Bone broth and coconut milk would help with all that though.

    Hope this helps a little. You be good to yourself and *demand* those referrals. Neither condition is anything to sneeze at. Granted, docs might go against everything described above, but you have a meter, so you decide for yourself what works for you. You'll have the testresults right at hand every single day, so... That should help guide you. :) (And yeah, there is medication that could be effective for T2. But if treated with meds only it is a progressive disease. Adding diet, or going diet-only, could actually get you back into the normal range without risk of complications. Something to consider. )

    Good luck!
    Jo
     
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  14. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @H7DNA
    Hello Andy and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  15. Major Buckmaster

    Major Buckmaster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have UC as well. It is funny disease. As it is completely unpredictable.

    Food choices might make a difference and then it might decide to flare up again!

    The meds are important as they are very safe, no side effects and do help.
     
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  16. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Some high level tips from me which might work. Minimise the carbs to low gi and remove direct sugar fairly stringently. Eat between and 1 and 2 times a day around something like 16 / 8, 16 / 6 or more window. Walk after meals. Start some resistance training (form over weight, and do body weight versions if no weights are available). Sleep, if you prioritise this, the gains you make from lifestyle changes are able to be realised during this period. This maybe a good start generally.

    Once you have got your head around this condition, perhaps consider what you would like to achieve i.e. in relation to your diabetic control - poor, good or excellent (my interpretation poor - diabetic range, good - pre - diabetic range and excellent low pre-diabetic to non - diabetic numbers (please note this does not pass judgement on those trying to optimise who cannot get into the more attractive categories)). Whilst is seems obvious which option everyone would like, there is a relationship between lifestyle choices and the end result.

    My final tip is to ask on this site what others have done to achieve the level you may choose - this will save weeks, months or even years of trial and error and for views posted there is a checks and balances approach where some may have a differing view for your consideration.
     
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  17. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    do you find that having colitis affects your food choices?
     
  18. Major Buckmaster

    Major Buckmaster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes it does effect some choices but not that many. Dairy can have a bad effect so have to limit cream etc. I hate milk so that doesn't bother me. I only have a tiny bit in tea.

    Too many vegetables can irritate so again limit those.

    I find most things agree with me. But I think the meds (metformin) has taken me into a bad flare (or at least made it worse.) I'm not overly sure which. Autoimmune diseases are odd.
    I have left sided disease so not as bad as some others but I also try to watch my intake of red meat as my bowel cancer risk is slightly higher than the general population but low risk for a colitis sufferer I am monitored 5 yearly for that but its always something to taking into consideration!

    Generally speaking its okay. And I can eat most things.
     
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  19. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. Can you let us know what your BMI/weight is just in case it throws some doubt on your T2 (versus T1) diagnosis. You must keep all the carbs down and see what your blood sugar does. My wife had UC all her life and for a period of time was on steroids which would cause high blood sugar if you are taking steroids. She found changing foods had no effect whatsoever. In the end her consultant recommended azathioprine which was a miracle cure for her but it does depress the immune system so needs to be monitored closely.
     
  20. H7DNA

    H7DNA Type 2 · Member

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    Thank you everyone for words and many words of wisdom, I have now got my readings down to 12.5 this is a winner for me finding it very difficult juggling between U C and T 2 diet - what's good for one is not so good for the other, however sometimes this has the benefit of reading up on things whilst sat on the loo for long periods having found out one of the things good for one but not so good for the other - dream come true I thought when I read double cream in my coffee for breakfast Lol I knew I was off dairy products for a reason... But thought will just try a little see how that pans out? It panned out alright! How ever I have discovered that Scrambled Eggs get both UC & T2 blessing! Tonight its Salman and broccoli adamant I want to be under the 10.0 by the weekend and stay under it. Having a meter is awesome better than the doctor who told me I was T2 and to watch what I eat, take these 3 times a day (Metformin 500) and somebody will be in touch! (Tic Toc Tic Toc)…… Still waiting hey ho - will get there I'm sure and for no other reasons than my wife and 2 year old little beautiful girl. I am not going to take the other prescribed drug for UC (Pentasa) as I think I really do need to get this T2 under control first.
     
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